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Hebballi NB, Gupta VS, Sheppard K, et al. J Patient Saf. 2022;18:e1021-e1026.
Handoffs from one care team to another present significant risks to the patient if essential patient information is not shared or understood by all team members. Stakeholders at this children’s hospital developed a structured tool for handoff between surgery and pediatric or neonatal intensive care units. Transfer of information and select patient outcomes improved, handoff time was unchanged, and attendance by all team members increased.

Davies JM, Steinke C, Flemons WW. New York, NY: Productivity Press; 2022. ISBN: 9781032028132.

Look-alike packaging can contribute to patient harm. This book examines how a mix up involving potassium chloride resulted in the deaths of two patients. The Canadian organization involved applied Reason’s strategies to work past blame to examine the events and consider how just culture can be entrenched organization-wide to improve safety for patients, families, and those who care for them.

President’s Council of Advisors on Science and Technology. Washington, DC: White House; September 21, 2022.

National efforts are required to adjust the health care system and embed safety in programs and processes. Speakers participating in this webinar discussed the impact of errors on families, adverse event prevalence, aviation safety lessons, nursing’s improvement role, the current state of patient safety and what needs to be done to reduce the impact and associated cost of harm.
Whatley C, Schlogl J, Whalen BL, et al. Jt Comm J Qual Patient Saf. 2022;48:521-528.
Newborn falls or drops are receiving increasing attention as a patient safety issue. This article discusses a quality improvement initiative launched at one hospital aimed to decrease newborn falls through new parent education materials, a nursing risk assessment tool, and standardized reporting system. Three years after implementation, the hospital achieved one year without any newborn falls and there were no fall-related injuries over the three-year period.

Tran AK, Calabrese M, Quatrara B, et al. Rockville, MD: Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality; September 2022. AHRQ Publication No. 22-0026-4-EF.

Nurses are underutilized as members of the diagnostic team. This publication examines the role of nursing educators and leaders to enhance the participation of nurses in diagnostic processes. It shares strategies for improving diagnosis through nurse engagement in the process. This issue brief is part of a series on diagnostic safety.
Boisvert S. J Healthc Risk Manag. 2022;Epub Aug 16.
Social determinants of health (SDOH) are non-medical factors that impact a person’s health and well-being. This commentary presents ways that risk managers can improve equity and patient safety by addressing two SDOH: health literacy and discrimination. The author recommends using existing risk management tools (e.g., error reporting, data collection) to develop strategies to address the negative impacts of SDOH.
Neiswender K, Figueroa-Altmann A, Granahan K, et al. Patient Safety. 2022;4:34-38.
Shifting to a nonpunitive approach to adverse events can improve error reporting and the overall safety culture. This article describes findings from focus groups with nurses at Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia (CHOP) regarding the perceived punitive nature of the hospital’s incident reporting system and outlines how those findings informed changes to the error review process. Lessons learned highlight the importance of who performs error follow-up, skills for navigating difficult conversations, transparency, and executive-level support. Five years after these program changes were implemented, 96% of nurses surveyed felt that the new process was nonpunitive.
Richie CD, Castle JT, Davis GA, et al. Angiology. 2022;73:712-715.
Hospital-acquired venous thromboembolism (VTE) continues to be a significant source of preventable patient harm. This study retrospectively examined patients admitted with VTE and found that only 15% received correct risk stratification and appropriate management and treatment. The case review found that patients were commonly incorrectly stratified, received incorrect pharmaceutical treatment, or inadequate application of mechanical prophylaxis (e.g., intermittent compression).
Montminy SL. J Healthc Risk Manag. 2022;Epub Aug 22.
Organizational leaders play a critical role in supporting a strong patient safety culture. In this study, patient safety leaders were interviewed to determine leadership characteristics and attitudes associated with creating and maintaining a robust safety culture. Results reveal several behaviors (e.g., exhibiting patient safety behavior), beliefs (e.g., fair and equitable measures of accountability), and characteristics (e.g., building trust and connections) that leaders need to support a successful culture of safety.
Passwater M, Huggins YM, Delvo Favre ED, et al. Am J Clin Pathol. 2022;158:212-215.
Wrong blood in tube (WBIT) errors are rare but can lead to complications. One hospital implemented a quality improvement project to reduce WBIT errors with electronic patient identification, manual independent dual verification, and staff education. WBIT errors were significantly reduced and sustained over six years.

Millenson M. Forbes. September 16, 2022.

Unnecessary medication infusions indicate weaknesses in medication service processes. While no harm was noted in the case discussed, the actions by the patient’s family to initiate an examination of the incident were rebuffed, patient disrespect was demonstrated, a near miss incident report was absent, and data omissions took place. The piece discusses how these detractors from safety were all present at the hospital involved.

NAM’s Action Collaborative on Clinician Well-Being and Resilience. Washington DC, American Association of Medical Colleges or virtual; October 3, 2022, 10:00 AM – 12:00 PM (eastern).

Concerted effort has been undertaken to understand the impact of clinician burnout on patient safety. This webinar will discuss the culmination of a six-year effort to design a national multidisciplinary guidance to address system issues that affect the wellbeing of clinicians.
AHA Training. November 9-10, 2022. Hilton Garden Inn, Houston, TX.
This education program will present group-focused opportunities for participants to learn how to apply Agency for Healthcare Quality and Research TeamSTEPPS 2.0 curriculum methods to develop staff training and improve team communication in their organizations.
Stenquist DS, Yeung CM, Szapary HJ, et al. J Am Acad Orthop Surg Glob Res Rev. 2022;6:e22.00079.
The I-PASS structured handoff tool has been widely implemented to improve communication during handoffs and patient transfers. In this study, researchers modified the I-PASS tool for use in orthopedic surgery and assessed the impact on adverse clinical outcomes. After 18 months, there was sustained adherence to the tool and the quality of handoffs improved, but no notable changes in clinical outcomes were identified.
Keller C. Health Aff (Millwood). 2022;41:1353-1356.
Communication failures due to hierarchy and silos create opportunities for adverse medication and treatment events. This narrative essay discusses gaps in care coordination that contributed to anticoagulant medication errors. The author outlines areas for improvement such as assignment of accountability for error and commitment to the learning health system as avenues for improvement.
Austin JM, Bane A, Gooder V, et al. J Patient Saf. 2022;18:526-530.
Use of bar code medication administration (BCMA) technology in hospitals has been shown to decrease medication errors at the time of administration. In 2016, the Leapfrog Group implemented a standard for BCMA use as part of its hospital survey. This article describes the development, testing, and subsequent refinement of the BCMA standard.
Goodwin C, Haas S, Berry WR. BMJ Leader. 2022;Epub Aug 19.
Disruptive behavior includes behaviors that show disrespect for others and impede safe delivery of patient care. This commentary presents a framework for new physician managers to address disruptive behavior modeled after clinical medicine: diagnose, treat, prevent. The authors stress maintaining curiosity during the “diagnostic” phase, careful consideration of “treatment” and follow-up, and “prevention” of future disruption though intentional training and building a culture of safety.

AHA Team Training. October 6 – November 17, 2022.

Despite the recognition that teamwork is essential to safe care, its implementation into established processes can be a challenge. Building on the established TeamSTEPPS® principles, this virtual workshop series focuses on leadership, change management and process integration to enrich organizational efforts to embed effective teamwork into care.
Harris CK, Chen Y, Yarsky B, et al. Acad Pathol. 2022;9:100049.
Physicians, including resident physicians, report safety events at lower rates than nurses and other staff. This study analyzed adverse event and near miss reporting by residents in one American hospital. Although pathology residents accounted for more than 5% of residents in the hospital, they only accounted for 0.5% of all reports.