Skip to main content

All Content

Search Tips
Save
Selection
Format
Download
Published Date
Original Publication Date
Original Publication Date
PSNet Publication Date
Narrow Results By
Commonly Searched Resource Types
1 - 11 of 11

This piece discusses an expanded view of maternal and infant safety that includes the concept of whole-person care, which addresses the structural and social determinants of maternal health.

Alison Stuebe, MD, MSc, is a professor and Division Director for Maternal-Fetal Medicine in the Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology at the University of North Carolina (UNC) at Chapel Hill and the co-director of the Collaborative for Maternal and Infant Health. Kristin Tully, PhD, is a research assistant professor in the Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology at UNC Chapel Hill and a member of the Collaborative for Maternal and Infant Health.

Dykes PC, Lowenthal G, Faris A, et al. J Patient Saf. 2021;17(1):56-62.
Failure to rescue – the lack of adequate response to patient deterioration – has been associated with adverse patient outcomes, particularly in acute care settings. This article describes two health systems’ efforts to implement in-hospital Clinical Monitoring System Technology (CMST) which positively impacted failure-to-rescue events. The authors identified barriers and facilitators to CMST use, which informed the development of an implementation toolkit addressing readiness, implementation, patient/family introduction, champions, and troubleshooting. 

Hannenberg AA, ed. Anesthesiol Clin. 2020;38(4):727-922.

Anesthesiology critical events are uncommon, and yet they have great potential for harm. This special issue focuses on management of, and preparation for, perioperative critical events and rescue should they occur. The authors highlight simulation training, debriefing, and cognitive aids as methods for improving safety in the operating room.
Residents living in nursing homes or residential care facilities use common dining and activity spaces and may share rooms, which increases the risk for transmission of COVID-19 infection. This document describes key patient safety challenges facing older adults living in these settings, who are particularly vulnerable to the effects of the virus, and identifies federal guidelines and resources related to COVID-19 prevention and mitigation in long-term care. As of April 13, 2020, the Associated

Institute for Safe Medication Practices. Horsham, PA: Institute for Safe Medication Practices; 2020.

Smart pumps are widely available as a medication safety tool yet there are challenges affecting their reliable use. This guideline expands on earlier recommendations  to support smart pump use in both hospitals and the ambulatory setting. The material provides recommendations that address infrastructure, drug libraries, quality improvement data, workflow and electronic health record interoperability concerns.
de Lima A, Osman BM, Shapiro FE. Curr Opin Anaesthesiol. 2019;32.
Office-based anesthesia (OBA) is being performed more commonly internationally. This narrative literature review updates the evidence related to the safety of OBA and makes recommendations for safe practices including; medical directors to be responsible for evidence-based policies, OBA safety and patient checklists emergency procedures, physical setting requirements, pharmacological management, preoperative procedures, airway management and others. The authors identify that lack of consistent regulations and incomplete protocol standardization is problematic.
Berman L, Ottosen M, Renaud E, et al. J Pediatr Surg. 2019;54:1872-1877.
Morbidity and mortality (M&M) conferences are designed to review adverse events. They are one method by which physicians undergo peer review to evaluate their performance and can allow health systems to identify potential avenues for improving patient safety. A survey of pediatric surgeons found that while the M&M participation was high, few believed the process results in practice changes or preventing future events. M&Ms considered most effective had a structured approach, were data driven with loop closure, emphasized multidisciplinary participation, and served as an educational forum.
Schmidt T, Kocher DR, Mahendran P, et al. Stud Health Technol Inform. 2019;267:224-229.
Structured communication methods such as SBAR (situation, background, assessment, recommendation) or ISBAR (identify, situation, background, assessment, recommendation)  were developed to improve handoffs in the hospital, particularly from nursing to physicians, and to reduce the impact of poor communication on adverse events. This study presents a digital pocket card incorporating ISBAR standards that can be used by nurses to facilitate patient handoffs and reporting.