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The PSNet Collection: All Content

The AHRQ PSNet Collection comprises an extensive selection of resources relevant to the patient safety community. These resources come in a variety of formats, including literature, research, tools, and Web sites. Resources are identified using the National Library of Medicine’s Medline database, various news and content aggregators, and the expertise of the AHRQ PSNet editorial and technical teams.

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Displaying 1 - 20 of 180 Results
Ross P, Hodgson CL, Ilic D, et al. Contemp Nurse. 2023;Epub May 8.
Improved nurse staffing ratios and nursing skill mix have been linked to improved safety outcomes. This retrospective cohort study of over 13,000 patients admitted to a tertiary intensive care unit (ICU) in Australia between 2016 and 2020 found that a great concentration of critical care registered nurses (CCRNs) was associated with a lower risk of adverse events.
Barger LK, Weaver MD, Sullivan JP, et al. BMJ Medicine. 2023;2:e000320.
The Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) in the United States limits resident physicians' workweek to 80 hours. Several studies have investigated the association between first year residents (i.e., interns, PGY1), worked hours and patient safety. This study includes residents beyond the first year (i.e., PGY2+). Nearly 5,000 PGY2+ residents reported the number of hours worked, patient safety outcomes, and resident health and outcomes. Working more than 60 hours in a week significantly increased the risk of a medical error resulting in patient death. The authors suggest weekly workweek limits should be significantly reduced, such as they are in the United Kingdom.
Lewis NJW, Marwitz KK, Gaither CA, et al. Jt Comm J Qual Patient Saf. 2023;49:280-284.
Community pharmacies face unique challenges in ensuring patient safety. This commentary summarizes research on prescribing errors in community pharmacies and how a culture of safety in community pharmacies can drive improvements in prescribing safety.
Kalfsvel L, Hoek K, Bethlehem C, et al. Br J Clin Pharmacol. 2022;88:5202-5217.
Medication errors are common, especially among medical trainees. This retrospective cohort study conducted at one medical center in the Netherlands identified a high rate of errors in prescriptions written by medical students (40% of all prescriptions). The most common type of error was inadequate information in the prescription – such as not indicating the dosage form or concentration, or missing usage instructions, or omitting the weight for a pediatric patient. Findings indicate that 29% of errors would not have been intercepted and resolved by an electronic prescribing system or pharmacist.
Hwang J, Kelz RR. BMJ Qual Saf. 2023;32:61-64.
Patient safety improvements must consider the complexities of care delivery to achieve lasting change. This commentary discusses recent evidence examining the effect of duty hour limit adjustments. The authors highlight challenges regarding research design on this medical education policy change and how it affects learner and patient experience. They suggest caution in applying the study conclusions. 

R3 Report. December 20, 2022;38:1-8.

Health care inequities persist despite increasing awareness they negatively affect quality, safety, and patient centeredness. This article shares the Joint Commission strategy for embedding equity improvement into the National Patient Safety Goal initiative to increase focus on equity as a safety priority across all care environments.

Goldstein J. New York Times. January 23, 2023.

Active errors are evident when they occur, yet systemic weaknesses, if not addressed, allow them to repeat. This story examines poor epidural methods of one clinician that coincided with lack of organizational practitioner monitoring, unequitable maternal care for black women and clinician COVID fatigue to contribute to patient death.
Leitman IM, Muller D, Miller S, et al. JAMA Netw Open. 2022;5:e2244661.
The effectiveness of incident reporting systems is hindered by underreporting. This cohort study describes the characteristics of incident reports submitted by trainees in a large academic medical center. From October 2019 through December 2021, trainees submitted nearly 200 incident reports, primarily describing unprofessional interactions. Findings suggest that awareness and support for the online incident reporting system among trainees was high.
Sephien A, Reljic T, Jordan J, et al. Med Educ. 2023;57:221-232.
The Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) includes work hour restrictions in its Common Program Requirements. The focus of this review is the impact of resident work hour restrictions on patient- and resident-level outcomes. Shorter shift hours were associated with some improved resident outcomes and but no association with patient outcomes.
Dehmoobad Sharifabadi A, Clarkin C, Doja A. BMJ Open. 2022;12:e063104.
Several countries have resident duty hour (RDH) restrictions and there are numerous publications examining the impact of RDH on patient safety. This study used two online discussion forums (one primarily in the United States and the other in Canada) to assess resident perceptions of RDH. Themes included its impact on residents’ education and clinician well-being, and, worryingly, discussions of not reporting RDH violations.
Boamah SA, Hamadi HY, Spaulding AC. J Patient Saf. 2022;18:e1090-e1095.
Medicare’s Hospital-Acquired Condition (HAC) Reduction Program financially incentivizes hospitals to reduce HAC rates and earlier research has shown hospitals in more diverse areas have higher odds of performing poorly. This study compares HAC reduction in Magnet and non-Magnet hospitals and examines potential racial and ethnic disparities. Similar to an earlier study, Magnet hospitals had significant improvements in methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) rates, but not other HACs.
Windish DM, Catalanotti JS, Zaas A, et al. J Gen Intern Med. 2022;37:2650-2660.
In 2022, the Accreditation Council on Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) began requiring residency programs to provide instruction and experience in pain management for internal medicine trainees. Residency program directors were surveyed in 2019 about whether and how they provide instruction and experience to residents in safe opioid prescribing (SOP) and treatment of opioid use disorder (OUD). Most programs required didactic learning, but few required clinical experience. Given that the ACGME requirement is now in place, the researchers suggest many programs may be ill-prepared to meet the requirement.
Hoffman S. J Med Regulation. 2022;108:19-28.
Patient safety advocates have called for cognitive testing of aging clinicians and some health systems have attempted instituting such policies as part of their recredentialing program. This commentary calls for state medical boards to adopt cognitive testing as part of the recredentialling process within the confines of legal boundaries.
Lambert BL, Schiff GD. J Am Coll Clin Pharm. 2022;5:981-987.
In the wake of the criminal conviction of a nurse involved in a medical error, numerous organizations and institutions have warned of the negative impact it could have on learning and error disclosure. This commentary presents strategies to reduce the risk of criminal prosecution for pharmacists, including education of prosecutors and expert witnesses and minimization of overrides and workarounds.
Smith CJ, DesRoches SL, Street NW, et al. J Healthc Risk Manag. 2022;42:24-30.
New graduate registered nurses (NGRNs) frequently experience a knowledge-practice gap during their transition to practice. This article suggests that the gap has widened, as COVID-19 restrictions impacted pre-licensure nurses’ education, clinical training, testing, and licensure. Recommendations for improving the transition to practice include innovative academic-clinical partnerships.
Graber ML, Holmboe ES, Stanley J, et al. Diagnosis (Berl). 2022;9:166-175.
In 2019, a consensus group identified twelve competencies to improve diagnostic education. This article details next steps for incorporating competencies into interprofessional health education: 1) Developing a shared, common language for diagnosis, 2) developing the necessary content, 3) developing assessment tools, 4) promoting faculty development, and 5) spreading awareness of the need to improve education in regard to diagnosis.