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The PSNet Collection: All Content

The AHRQ PSNet Collection comprises an extensive selection of resources relevant to the patient safety community. These resources come in a variety of formats, including literature, research, tools, and Web sites. Resources are identified using the National Library of Medicine’s Medline database, various news and content aggregators, and the expertise of the AHRQ PSNet editorial and technical teams.

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Displaying 1 - 10 of 10 Results
Khan A, Spector ND, Baird JD, et al. BMJ. 2018;363:k4764.
Patient engagement in safety takes many forms: patients may report unique safety incidents, encourage adherence to best medical practice, and coproduce improvement initiatives. Family-centered rounding in pediatrics invites families to express concerns, clarify information, and provide real-time input to the health care team. This pre–post study explored the safety impact of family-centered rounds on 3106 admissions in pediatric units at 7 hospitals. Family-centered rounds reduced both preventable and nonpreventable adverse events. They also improved family experience without substantially lengthening rounding time. A past PSNet interview discussed the safety benefits of structured communication between health care providers and family members.
Nickel WK, Weinberger SE, Guze PA, et al. Ann Intern Med. 2018;169:796-799.
Patient and family engagement can enhance both individual safety and organizational improvement efforts. This position paper advocates for patients and families to be active partners in all aspects of their care, treated with respect and dignity, engaged in improving health care systems, and directly involved in education of health care professionals. The piece also provides strategies to employ these recommendations in the daily practice.
Sharma AE, Rivadeneira NA, Barr-Walker J, et al. Health Aff (Millwood). 2018;37:1813-1820.
Patient and family engagement efforts can affect health care quality and safety. This review examined the research on patient engagement efforts and found evidence of robust examinations of patient engagement related to patient self-management of anticoagulation medications. However, there was mixed-quality evidence on patient involvement in medication administration errors, documentation and scheduling accuracy, hospital readmissions, and health care–associated infections. They recommend areas of research needed to guide the application of patient engagement strategies.
Mann S, Hollier LM, McKay K, et al. New Engl J Med. 2018;379:1689-1691.
Maternal morbidity has received increasing attention as a patient safety issue. This commentary recommends four strategies for improving obstetrics safety: focusing on prevention of complications, using multidisciplinary huddles to enhance communication, employing simulation as a teamwork training model, and developing partnerships between hospitals to ensure the best care is available.
Bates DW, Landman A, Levine DM. JAMA. 2018;320:1975-1976.
Mobile health care applications are increasingly being developed and marketed to patients for self-care and diagnosis, with little oversight as to their effectiveness or safety. This commentary outlines four key issues that must be addressed to improve the safety of medical applications.
Billstein-Leber M, Carrillo CJD, Cassano AT, et al. Am J Health-Syst Pharm. 2018;75:1493-1517.
Pharmacists can play an important role in medication error reduction efforts across health care systems. This document provides recommendations and best practices for health-system pharmacists to improve safety throughout the medication-use process.
Schnipper JL, Mixon A, Stein J, et al. BMJ Qual Saf. 2018;27:954-964.
The goal of medication reconciliation is to prevent unintended medication discrepancies at times of transitions in care, which can lead to adverse events. Implementing effective medication reconciliation interventions has proven to be challenging. In this AHRQ-funded quality improvement study, five hospitals implemented a standardized approach to admission and discharge medication reconciliation using an evidence-based toolkit with longitudinal mentorship from the study investigators. The toolkit was implemented at each study site by a pharmacist and a hospitalist with support from local leadership. The intervention did not achieve overall reduction in potentially harmful medication discrepancies compared to baseline temporal trends. However, significant differences existed between the study sites, with sites that successfully implemented the recommended interventions being more likely to achieve reductions in harmful medication discrepancies. The study highlights the difficulty inherent in implementing quality improvement interventions in real-world settings. A WebM&M commentary discussed the importance of medication reconciliation and suggested best practices.
Stockwell DC, Landrigan CP, Toomey SL, et al. Pediatrics. 2018;142:e20173360.
This study used a trigger tool (the Global Assessment of Pediatric Patient Safety) to examine temporal trends in adverse event rates at 16 randomly selected children's hospitals. Adverse event rates did not significantly change at either teaching or nonteaching hospitals from 2007 to 2012. Interestingly, nonteaching hospitals had lower error rates than teaching facilities, although the increased complexity of patients at teaching hospitals may account for this finding. The results of this study mirror those of a similar study conducted in adult hospitals from 2002 to 2007. An accompanying editorial notes that quality improvement collaboratives have achieved reductions in hospital-acquired conditions at children's hospitals and speculates that these discordant findings could be due to the fact that trigger tools are able to detect a broader range of adverse events and thus may provide a more accurate picture of safety. A WebM&M commentary discussed a preventable medication error at a children's hospital.
Nix M, McNamara P, Genevro J, et al. Health Aff (Millwood). 2018;37:205-212.
Learning collaboratives are multimodal interventions that are often used to implement evidence-based practices. This perspective from AHRQ scientists proposes a taxonomy to describe collaboratives' distinct elements: innovation, or the type of positive change; communication among members; duration and sustainability; and social systems, or the organization and culture of the collaborative. The authors suggest that efforts to evaluate learning collaboratives or quality improvement interventions employ this taxonomy.
Darnall BD, Ziadni MS, Stieg RL, et al. JAMA Intern Med. 2018;178:707-708.
This prospective cohort study found that many outpatients treated at a chronic pain clinic were willing to voluntarily taper opioid medications. Although nearly 40% of patients dropped out of the study, those that remained significantly reduced their opioid dosing. The authors suggest that offering a voluntary gradual opioid taper to patients with chronic pain may reduce their opioid dose.