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Zimolzak AJ, Singh H, Murphy DR, et al. BMJ Health Care Inform. 2022;29(1):e100565.

Patient safety algorithms developed through research must also be implemented into clinical practice. This article describes the process of translating an electronic health record-based algorithm for detecting missed follow-up of colorectal or lung cancer testing, from research into practice. All 12 test sites were able to successfully implement the trigger and identify appropriate cases.

The Patient Safe-D(ischarge) program used standardized tools to educate patients about their discharge needs, test understanding of those needs, and improve medication reconciliation at admission and discharge. A quasi-randomized controlled trial of the program found that it significantly increased patients' understanding and knowledge of their diagnoses, treatment, and required follow-up care.

Koo JK, Moyer L, Castello MA, et al. Pediatr Qual Saf. 2020;5:e329.
Children are highly vulnerable to safety risks associated with written handoffs. This article describes the impact of unit-wide implementation of a new handoff tool using electronic health record (EHR) auto-populated fields for pertinent neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) patient data. Handoff time remained the same, and the tool increased the accuracy of patient data included in handoffs and reduced the frequency of incorrect medications listing. 

Garman AN, McAlearney AS, Harrison MI, et al. Health Care Manag Rev. 2011-2020.

In this continuing series, high-performance work practices are explored and defined through literature review, case analysis, and research. The authors summarize findings and discuss how best practices can influence quality, safety, and efficiency outcomes. Topics covered include speaking up, central line infection prevention, and business case development.
Pfeiffer Y, Zimmermann C, Schwappach DLB. J Patient Saf. 2020;Publish Ahead of Print.
This study examined patient safety issues stemming from health information technology (HIT)-related information management hazards. The authors identified eleven thematic groups describing such hazards occurring at a systemic level, such as fragmentation of patient information, “information islands” (e.g., nurses and physicians have separate information sets despite the same HIT system), and inadequate information structures (e.g., no drug interaction warning integrated in the chemotherapy prescribing tool).

SB 3380. 116th Congress (2020).

This bill submits amendments to existing US federal law to strengthen state-organized efforts to improve health care-associated infection control efforts, pediatric safety initiatives, care transitions, reporting systems and antimicrobial stewardship programs.
Song Y, Hoben M, Norton PG, et al. JAMA Netw Open. 2020;3.
The authors surveyed over 4,000 care aids from 93 urban nursing homes in Western Canada to assess the association of work environment with missed and rushed essential care tasks. During their most recent shift, over half of care aids (57.4%) reported missing at least one essential care task and two-thirds (65.4%) reported rushing at least one essential care task. Work environments with better work culture and more effective leadership were associated with fewer missed or rushed care tasks.
O'Toole JK, Starmer AJ, Calaman S, et al. MedEdPORTAL. 2018;14:10736.
The I-PASS structured handoff tool intends to reduce errors and preventable adverse events. This article describes the development of the I-PASS Mentored Implementation Guide. The guide was considered by I-PASS sites essential, particularly the sections on the I-PASS curriculum and handoff observations.
Seen in the emergency department, a man with insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus had not taken insulin for 3 days. His blood glucose levels were in the 800s with an anion-gap acidosis and positive beta hydroxybutyrate. While awaiting an ICU bed for treatment of diabetic ketoacidosis, the patient received fluids, an insulin drip was started, and blood glucose levels were monitored hourly. When lab results showed he was improving, the team decided to convert his insulin drip to subcutaneous long-acting insulin.
Destino LA, Dixit A, Pantaleoni JL, et al. Jt Comm J Qual Patient Saf. 2017;43:80-88.
Adverse events after hospital discharge are common. Prior research demonstrates that communication and information transfer between inpatient providers and primary care physicians (PCPs) may be lacking, raising patient safety concerns. This study described how applying Lean methodology, enhancing frontline provider engagement, and redesigning workflow processes within the electronic health record led to improved communication with PCPs around the time of hospital discharge. Through these interventions, the pediatric medical service was able to increase verbal communication with PCPs at discharge to 80%, and they sustained this for a 7-month period. Discharge communication with PCPs across other services improved as well. A previous PSNet perspective discussed the challenges associated with care transitions and suggested opportunities for improvement.
Lee S-H, Phan PH, Dorman T, et al. BMC Health Serv Res. 2016;16:254.
Timely and accurate handoff communication is a critical aspect of patient safety. This survey of hospital staff found that positive perceptions of handoff practices were associated with safety culture, as measured by the AHRQ Hospital Survey on Patient Safety Culture. The authors suggest focusing on improving handoffs as a strategy to enhance safety culture.
Small A, Gist D, Souza D, et al. J Nurs Care Qual. 2016;31:304-9.
Change management has been described as a critical strategy to ensure safety improvements are sustained. This commentary discusses how one hospital applied a well-known change model to implement a new bedside handoff process and reports positive reactions from nurses and patients one month after the intervention.
Khan A, Rogers JE, Forster CS, et al. Hosp Pediatr. 2016;6:319-29.
This survey study identified significant communication gaps between parents of hospitalized children and the resident physicians caring for them overnight. Although both parents and physicians rated communication highly, there were differences in parent and physician understanding of the reason for admission, overall plan, and overnight plan, particularly for children with more complex illness. This demonstrates the gap between perceptions of communication and shared understanding.
Daigh JD Jr. Washington, DC: VA Office of the Inspector General; December 15, 2014. Report No. 14-04705-62.
Misrepresentation of findings, either by accident or design, can result in ineffective use of resources and poor decision-making. This investigation found inconsistencies in the information reported by the Veterans Health Administration in the widely-publicized analysis discussing weaknesses in the organization that resulted in delayed care. The author calls for the assessment to be revisited to ensure conclusions and work toward improvement are verifiable to augment the safety and timeliness of care provided to veterans.
American Hospital Association; AHA.
Hospitals and health systems face challenges in implementing electronic health records that can affect safety. This webinar introduced the SAFER guides, which highlight strategies to improve safety related to electronic health record use, and educate participants about ways to implement these guides in their organizations. The session featured Hardeep Singh and Dean F. Sittig as speakers.
Kizer KW, Jha AK. N Engl J Med. 2014;371:295-297.
In response to a recent investigation raising concerns about inaccurate reporting of wait-time data, this commentary relates barriers to improving patient safety, such as overuse of performance measures. The authors describe approaches to augment safety, such as narrowing down performance measures to address the most significant concerns and engaging private health care organizations in improvement projects.
Koch PE, Simpson D, Toth H, et al. Academic Medicine. 2014;89.
This qualitative analysis of medical students' perceptions revealed persistent concerns related to the safety of transitions in care, despite much attention and recommendations related to improving handoffs. The most common cause of frustration among students was poor communication, which included unclear discussion about responsibilities, incomplete explanation regarding patients' needs, and inadequate identification of health care workers involved with the handoff.