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Holmes J, Chipman M, Barbour T, et al. Jt Comm J Qual Patient Saf. 2022;48:12-24.
Air medical transport carries unique patient safety risks. In this study, researchers used simulation training and healthcare failure mode and effect analysis (HFMEA) to identify latent safety threats related to patient transport via helicopter. This approach identified 31 latent safety threats (18 were deemed critical) related to care coordination, facilities, equipment, and devices.
Dadlez NM, Adelman J, Bundy DG, et al. Ped Qual Saf. 2020;5:e299-e305.
Diagnostic errors, including missed diagnoses of adolescent depression, elevated blood pressure, and delayed response to abnormal lab results, are common in pediatric primary care. Building upon previous work, this study used root cause analyses to identify the failure points and contributing factors to these errors. Omitted process steps included failure to screen for adolescent depression, failure to recognize and act on abnormal blood pressure values, and failure to notify families of abnormal lab results. Factors contributing most commonly to these errors were patient volume, inadequate staffing, clinic environment, electronic and written communication, and provider knowledge.
National Pharmacy Association; NPA.
This website for independent community pharmacy owners across the United Kingdom features both free and members-only guidance, reporting platforms, and document templates to support patient safety. It includes reporting tools and incident analysis reports for providers in England, Scotland, and Northern Ireland. Topics covered in the communications include look-alike and sound-alike drugs, patient safety audits, and safe dispensing of liquid medications.
Hospitalized with sepsis secondary to an infected IV line through which she was receiving treprostnil (a high-alert medication used to treat pulmonary hypertension), a woman was transferred to interventional radiology for placement of a new permanent catheter once the infection cleared. Sign-off between departments included a warning not to flush the line since it would lead to a dangerous overdose. However, while attempting to identify an infusion pump alarm, a radiology technician accidentally flushed the line, which led to a near code situation.
Landro L. Wall Street Journal. March 28, 2011.
This newspaper article discusses how combining best practices in teamwork, simulation, and communication can improve patient safety during obstetric emergencies.

Baker GR, ed. Healthc Q. 2010;13(Spec No):1-136.  

This is the fifth in a series of special issues devoted to exploring Canadian patient safety organizational and strategic improvement efforts. The articles highlight work related to topics including critical occurrence review, hand hygiene compliance, and effective handoffs.
London, UK: Care Quality Commission; October 2009. CQC-039-500-ESP-102009. ISBN: 9781845622442.
This report analyzed how medication information is shared among UK practices and patients after a hospital stay and found that 81% of general practices thought that patient information given to them from hospitals was incomplete or inaccurate.
Sixth Report of Session 2008–09. House of Commons Health Committee. London, England: The Stationery Office; July 3, 2009. Publication HC 151-I.
This government report analyzes the National Health Service's efforts to enhance patient safety and recommends improving certain areas, such as adopting technology, analyzing failure, and ensuring both practitioner education and adequate staffing.
Rosen AK, Loveland SA, Romano PS, et al. Med Care. 2009;47:723-31.
This study adds to a growing body of data demonstrating that duty hours reforms have not adversely affected clinical outcomes or patient safety. The authors compared patient safety events (as measured by the AHRQ Patient Safety Indicators) before and after reduction of resident duty hours and found no significant change in surgical or procedural adverse events. Prior studies found no changes in mortality rates, self-reported errors, or trainee case volume after implementation of duty hours regulations, but other studies have shown reduced satisfaction with education and concerns about worsened continuity of care. Recent Institute of Medicine recommendations on residency work hours emphasized the need to maintain a balance between educational objectives and patient safety.
Oakbrook Terrace, IL: The Joint Commission; November 2008.
The quality of care delivered at US hospitals continues to improve, according to data gathered by the Joint Commission from nearly 1,500 institutions. Hospitals improved their provision of evidence-based care for patients with heart attacks, congestive heart failure, and pneumonia, and also improved at prevention of health care–associated infections in surgical patients. As in the 2007 report, adherence to the National Patient Safety Goals was more mixed. Although performance improved in some areas (including medication reconciliation and eliminating "do not use" abbreviations), many hospitals do not systematically perform time outs prior to procedures, or have reliable mechanisms for communicating critical test results.
Loren DJ, Klein EJ, Garbutt J, et al. Arch Pediatr Adolesc Med. 2008;162:922-927.
Studies of medical error disclosure have demonstrated that, while physicians support disclosure of errors in theory, most "choose their words carefully" in practice and fail to disclose important elements of the error. In this study, pediatricians were presented with error scenarios and asked to describe what they would disclose to the child's parents. Overall, a minority of physicians would fully disclose the error, and most would not offer an explicit apology. An accompanying editorial discusses barriers to disclosing errors and strategies (including communication training) that should be implemented to improve this aspect of patient–physician communication.
Scholefield H. Best Pract Res Clin Obstet Gynaecol. 2008;22:965-82.
In the context of obstetric clinical care, this article reviews research on patient safety and describes a seven-step framework to improve safety.
Singh H, Thomas EJ, Petersen LA, et al. Arch Intern Med. 2007;167:2030-6.
This AHRQ-funded study uncovered distinctive features of errors involving trainees, including teamwork and communication breakdowns, failures of supervision and handoffs, and excessive workload. Building on a past study of closed malpractice claims, investigators conducted a subanalysis of those claims in which housestaff or fellows were thought to play an important role. As the claims predate the introduction of trainee work hour restrictions, the authors call for continued research into trainee errors and targeted training interventions to address current areas of concern. An accompanying editorial discusses a dramatically new model for inpatient care that would begin to address the problem areas identified in this study.
Following surgery, a woman on a patient-controlled analgesia pump is found to be lethargic and incoherent, with a low respiratory rate. The nurse contacted the attending physician, who dismisses the patient's symptoms and chastises the nurse for the late call.