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The PSNet Collection: All Content

The AHRQ PSNet Collection comprises an extensive selection of resources relevant to the patient safety community. These resources come in a variety of formats, including literature, research, tools, and Web sites. Resources are identified using the National Library of Medicine’s Medline database, various news and content aggregators, and the expertise of the AHRQ PSNet editorial and technical teams.

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Curated Libraries
September 13, 2021
Ensuring maternal safety is a patient safety priority. This library reflects a curated selection of PSNet content focused on improving maternal safety. Included resources explore strategies with the potential to improve maternal care delivery and outcomes, such as high reliability, care standardization,teamwork, unit-based safety initiatives, and...
Amalberti R, Brami J. BMJ Qual Saf. 2012;21:729-36.
The systems approach to analyzing adverse events emphasizes how active errors (those made by individuals) and latent errors (underlying system flaws) contribute to preventable harm. Adverse events in ambulatory care may arise from an especially complex array of latent errors. This paper explores the role of time management problems, which the authors term "tempos," as a contributor to errors in ambulatory care. Through a review of closed malpractice claims, the authors identify 5 tempos that can affect the risk of an adverse event: disease tempo (the expected disease course), patient tempo (timing of complaints and adherence to recommendations), office tempo (including the availability of clinicians and test results), system tempo (such as access to specialists or emergency services), and access to knowledge. The role of these tempos in precipitating diagnostic errors and communication errors is discussed through analysis of the patterns of errors in malpractice claims. A preventable adverse event caused by misunderstanding of disease tempo is discussed in this AHRQ WebM&M commentary.
Phillips RL, Dovey SM, Graham D, et al. J Patient Saf. 2008;2.
This AHRQ–funded study discovered differential reporting patterns among staff, clinicians, and patients in 10 family medicine clinics. Using anonymous reporting systems during a defined study period, investigators analyzed more than 900 errors generated by an even distribution of reports from staff and clinicians. However, while staff focused on errors in patient flow and communication, clinicians noted mostly medication- and laboratory-related errors. Overall, the large majority of errors were classified as process errors rather than as knowledge- and skill-related errors. Very few patient-generated reports described an error, suggesting that different strategies may be required to engage patients in similar reporting efforts.
Kachalia A, Gandhi TK, Puopolo AL, et al. Ann Emerg Med. 2007;49:196-205.
This study addressing the causes of missed and delayed diagnoses in emergency department patients used similar methodology as a companion study of error in the ambulatory setting and a prior study of surgical patients. Errors involved a broad range of patients and conditions. As in the outpatient arena, errors generally occurred due to failure to order diagnostic tests or interpret them correctly; factors contributing to error included cognitive factors (ie, physician judgment or knowledge), but system factors (ie, fatigue or communication breakdowns) were involved in a significant proportion of cases. As was also found in the study of ambulatory patients, the multifactorial nature of the errors identifies many potential areas for action but likely defies simple solutions. 
Cohen MR.
This monthly selection of medication error reports discusses a mistake with chelation therapy agents due to similar acronym use, confusion of drugs similarly named in different countries, and inadequate information about changes to an existing drug.