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The PSNet Collection: All Content

The AHRQ PSNet Collection comprises an extensive selection of resources relevant to the patient safety community. These resources come in a variety of formats, including literature, research, tools, and Web sites. Resources are identified using the National Library of Medicine’s Medline database, various news and content aggregators, and the expertise of the AHRQ PSNet editorial and technical teams.

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Displaying 1 - 11 of 11 Results

Building Trust and the ABIM Foundation. Addressing the Loss of Trust in Safety Culture. September 13, 2022. 

Trust in patient safety processes encourages reporting of concerns, learning from error, and development of safety-focused patient/family partnerships. This session discussed how criminal actions against clinicians who err, challenge the balance needed to ensure that patients can trust the health care system to hold those accountable when error occurs, while enabling clinicians to trust their reported mistakes to be managed appropriately.

Patient Safety Movement. October 29, 2021. 

Effective response to medical harm involves a variety of perspectives that are aligned in purpose. This webinar discussed how different stakeholders might view approaches to medical error management. It described how strategies have changed from paternalistic to inclusive processes that consider the impact of mistakes on patients and families and the role of communication is key to achieving fair and honest resolution to adverse incidents.

Collaborative for Accountability and Improvement. October 21, 2021. 

Communication-and-resolution program (CRP) initiatives are a valuable strategy for improving support and transparency after an adverse incident. This webinar discussed how patients and families feel about support mechanisms after they have experienced medical error, if they were involved in a CRP process and the types of information they required after a harmful incident.

National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. June 7-8, 2021.

Maternal safety is challenged by clinical, equity, and social influences. This virtual event examined maternal health conditions in the United States to improve health system practice and performance for this population. Discussions addressed the need for better data collection, evidence-based practice, and social determinants knowledge integration to enhance the safety of care.

Patient Safety Movement Foundation. 2021. 

The Communication and Optimal Resolution (CANDOR) model was designed to support early error disclosure with patients and families after mistakes in care occur. This three-part webinar series introduced the CANDOR process, discussed CANDOR implementation, outlined the importance of organizational readiness assessment for the program, and described actions to sustain CANDOR after it has launched. Speakers include Dr. Timothy McDonald, the originator of the model.
Health Services Research and the Health Research and Educational Trust. March 2, 2017.
Communication-and-resolution programs emphasize transparency and respect in discussions with patients and families following an adverse event. This webinar highlighted AHRQ-funded research and programs that explored the impact of communication-and-resolution programs and other strategies that focus on improving patient safety and reducing liability. Researchers from a recent special issue devoted to this work were featured speakers.
National Health Policy Forum. Washington, DC: George Washington University. March 11, 2016.
This report provides the insights from a panel exploring the need for transparency after a medical mistake occurs. The session discussed the history and evolution of new approaches to achieve transparency, such as communication-and-resolution programs. Experts participating in the session included Dr. David Mayer, Richard Boothman, and Helen Haskell.
ProPublica. Kaiser Family Foundation's Barbara Jordan Conference Center, Washington, DC; March 23, 2016.
Reporting mechanisms to share performance data with consumers have been launched in an effort to increase transparency, but there are criticisms regarding their usefulness. In response to the launch of the Surgeon Scorecard, this session featured a discussion on causes of patient harm, the role of transparency in enhancing safety, and the value of publicly available data in assisting in provider selection. Featured panelists include Dr. Ashish Jha and Dr. Martin Makary.