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Farrell C‐JL, Giannoutsos J. Int J Lab Hematol. 2022;44:497-503.
Wrong blood in tube (WBIT) errors can result in serious diagnostic and treatment errors, but may go unrecognized by clinical staff. In this study, machine learning was used to identify potential WBIT errors which were then compared to manual review by laboratory staff. The machine learning models showed higher accuracy, sensitivity, and specificity compared to manual review. 
Abraham P, Augey L, Duclos A, et al. J Patient Saf. 2021;17:e615-e621.
Patient misidentification errors are common and potentially catastrophic. Patient identification incidents reported in one hospital were examined to identify errors and contributory factors. Of the 293 reported incidents, the most common errors were missing wristbands, wrong charts or notes in files, administrative issues, and wrong labeling. The most frequent contributory factors include absence of patient identity control, patient transfer, and emergency context.
Nelson K. Clin Dermatol. 2014;32:542-4.
This commentary reveals insights from a physician who was involved in a misidentified specimen incident. The author explains how the organization performed a root cause analysis to determine safety gaps in specimen handling processes and recommends four key steps to prevent errors.
Snydman LK, Harubin B, Kumar S, et al. Am J Med Qual. 2012;27:147-53.
This article uses data from a large database of voluntarily reported errors to characterize errors in laboratory medicine. Most errors occurred at the preanalytic phase (before the specimen arrived in the laboratory), with many errors arising from misidentification of specimens. The vast majority of the more than 30,000 errors analyzed did not lead to patient harm. A pathology misidentification error that resulted in disclosure of an incorrect diagnosis to a patient is discussed in this AHRQ WebM&M commentary.
Cohen MR.
This monthly selection of medication error reports includes an error averted because the pharmacist checked the patient's prior prescription data and a dosing error due to consumer confusion about dose measurement.
Bittle MJ, Charache P, Wassilchalk DM. Jt Comm J Qual Patient Saf. 2007;33:25-33.
In response to multiple incidents of registration-associated patient misidentification (eg, assigning a new patient an existing patient's medical record number), an interdisciplinary team used plan-do-study-act methodology to investigate the root cause of such errors and formulate solutions. Several system problems were identified, ranging from inadequate training of registrars to the lack of a true master list of patients' medical record numbers. The authors describe the iterative process used to identify and address sources of error at several points within the patient registration process.
Cohen MR.
This monthly column discusses the value of learning from rare yet severe events, shares successes with read backs, and reports on errors involving non-formulary medications and vincristine therapy.
Cohen MR.
This monthly selection of medication error reports discusses a mistake with chelation therapy agents due to similar acronym use, confusion of drugs similarly named in different countries, and inadequate information about changes to an existing drug.
Feldman R
In this article, a nurse shares her firsthand account of what it was like to be a surgical patient and the surprising safety and quality shortcomings she encountered during her hospital stay.
National Health Service.
This Web site provide resources for improving patient safety in the National Health Service, including a place for practitioners to ask questions and share experiences with one another.