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The PSNet Collection: All Content

The AHRQ PSNet Collection comprises an extensive selection of resources relevant to the patient safety community. These resources come in a variety of formats, including literature, research, tools, and Web sites. Resources are identified using the National Library of Medicine’s Medline database, various news and content aggregators, and the expertise of the AHRQ PSNet editorial and technical teams.

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Displaying 1 - 20 of 135 Results
Perspective on Safety November 16, 2022

Dr. Pascale Carayon, PhD, is a professor emerita in the Department of Industrial and Systems Engineering and the founding director of the Wisconsin Institute for Healthcare Systems Engineering (WIHSE). Dr. Nicole Werner, PhD, is an associate professor in the Department of Health and Wellness Design at the Indiana University School of Public Health-Bloomington. We spoke with both of them about the role of human factors engineering has in improving healthcare delivery and its role in patient safety.

Lafferty M, Harrod M, Krein SL, et al. J Am Med Inform Assoc. 2021;28:28(12).
Use of one-way communication technologies, such as pagers, in hospitals have led to workarounds to improve communication. Through observation, shadowing, interviews, and focus groups with nurses and physicians, this study describes antecedents, types, and effects of workarounds and their potential impact on patient safety.
Curated Libraries
September 13, 2021
Ensuring maternal safety is a patient safety priority. This library reflects a curated selection of PSNet content focused on improving maternal safety. Included resources explore strategies with the potential to improve maternal care delivery and outcomes, such as high reliability, care standardization,teamwork, unit-based safety initiatives, and...
Scantlebury A, Sheard L, Fedell C, et al. Digit Health. 2021;7:205520762110100.
Electronic health record (EHR) downtime can disrupt patient care and increase risk for medical errors. Semi-structured interviews with healthcare staff and leadership at one large hospital in England illustrate the negative consequences of a three-week downtime of an electronic pathology system on patient experience and safety. The authors propose recommendations for hospitals to consider when preparing for potential technology downtimes.
Ihlebæk HM. Int J Nurs Stud. 2020;109:103636.
Using ethnographic methods, this study explored the impact of ‘silent report’ (computer-mediated handover) on nurses’ cognitive work and communication. The authors summarize four emerging themes, which highlight and characterize the importance of oral communication to ensure accurate and useful handovers.
Diaz MCG, Dawson K. Am J Med Qual. 2020;35:474-478.
Communication and shared mental models are key elements to effective teamwork. This study explored whether simulation-based closed-loop communication training would improve staff perceptions of communication ability and decrease medical errors. Increases in perception of closed-loop communication ability were sustained one-month after training. A retrospective chart review of all emergency severity index (ESI) level 1 patients (n=9) seen in the 4-months pre- and post-training showed a reduction in medical errors (89% to 56%, respectively).
Skaret MM, Weaver TD, Humes RJ, et al. J Healthc Qual. 2019;41:274-280.
I-PASS, a care transition handoff tool that enhances communication when coordinating patient transfer of care during medical shift changes, has been found to reduce preventable errors associated with handoffs. New pilot study found user-generated patient information and automatically compiled EHR data in the I-PASS format can reduce documentation errors.
Orenstein EW, Ferro DF, Bonafide CP, et al. JAMIA Open. 2019;2(3):392-398.
Handoffs represent a vulnerable time for patients when lapses in communication may adversely impact safety. Prior research has shown that medication errors occur frequently among patients transferred from ICU to non-ICU locations within the same hospital. In this qualitative study, physicians reviewed transfer notes and handoff documents for 50 patients transferred from a pediatric ICU to a medical unit. They found clinically relevant differences between the handoff and transfer note documentation in 42% of the transfers and conclude that such discrepancies are both common and place patient safety at risk. A previous WebM&M commentary described an adverse event related to a patient handoff.
Emani S, Sequist TD, Lacson R, et al. Jt Comm J Qual Patient Saf. 2019;45:552-557.
Health care systems struggle to ensure patients with precancerous colon and lung lesions receive appropriate follow-up. This academic center hired navigators who effectively increased the proportion of patients who completed recommended diagnostic testing for colon polyps and lung nodules. A WebM&M commentary described how patients with lung nodules are at risk for both overtreatment and undertreatment.
O'Toole JK, Starmer AJ, Calaman S, et al. MedEdPORTAL. 2018;14:10736.
The I-PASS structured handoff tool intends to reduce errors and preventable adverse events. This article describes the development of the I-PASS Mentored Implementation Guide. The guide was considered by I-PASS sites essential, particularly the sections on the I-PASS curriculum and handoff observations.
WebM&M Case February 1, 2019
To transfer a man with possible sepsis to a hospital with subspecialty and critical care, a physician was unaware of a formal protocol and called a colleague at the academic medical center. The colleague secured a bed, and the patient was sent over. However, neither clinical data nor the details of the patient's current condition were transmitted to the hospital's transfer center, and the receiving physician booked a general ward bed rather than an ICU bed. When the patient arrived, his mentation was altered and breathing was rapid.
Cierniak KH; Gaunt MJ; Grissinger M.
The operating room environment harbors particular patient safety hazards. Drawing from 1137 perioperative medication error reports submitted over a 1-year period, this analysis found that more than half of the recorded incidents reached the patient and the majority of those stemmed from communication breakdowns during transitions or handoffs. The authors provide recommendations to reduce risks of error, including using barcode medication administration, standardizing handoff procedures, and stocking prefilled syringes.
WebM&M Case January 1, 2019
A woman with a history of psychiatric illness presented to the emergency department with agitation, hallucinations, tachycardia, and transient hypoxia. The consulting psychiatric resident attributed the tachycardia and hypoxia to her underlying agitation and admitted her to an inpatient psychiatric facility. Over the next few days, her tachycardia persisted and continued to be attributed to her psychiatric disease. On hospital day 5, the patient was found unresponsive and febrile, with worsening tachycardia, tachypnea, and hypoxia; she had diffuse myoclonus and increased muscle tone.
Tamblyn R, Winslade N, Lee TC, et al. J Am Med Inform Assoc. 2018;25:482-495.
Medication reconciliation has been shown to improve patient safety by reducing medication errors, yet barriers to implementation persist. In this cluster-randomized trial, researchers describe the implementation of an electronic medication reconciliation process that involved the automatic integration of community drug data. They found that surgical and medical units in the intervention arm of the study demonstrated significantly higher rates of medication reconciliation completion.
WebM&M Case October 1, 2017
Hospitalized with sepsis secondary to an infected IV line through which she was receiving treprostnil (a high-alert medication used to treat pulmonary hypertension), a woman was transferred to interventional radiology for placement of a new permanent catheter once the infection cleared. Sign-off between departments included a warning not to flush the line since it would lead to a dangerous overdose. However, while attempting to identify an infusion pump alarm, a radiology technician accidentally flushed the line, which led to a near code situation.
Nanchal R, Aebly B, Graves G, et al. BMJ Qual Saf. 2017;26:987-992.
Communication errors during handoffs can lead to patient harm. Standardizing the handoff process has been shown to improve patient safety. This prospective trial demonstrated that implementation of a standardized intensive care unit sign-out process among residents led to fewer unexpected patient events and unplanned interventions.
Maroo S, Raj D. BMJ Qual Improv Rep. 2017;6.
Handoffs and weekend care are two error-prone elements of health care. This commentary describes a project that focused on shifting from a paper-based to an electronic handoff process to enhance handover reliability over the weekend. The authors explain how using plan-do-study-act cycles helped augment implementation of the new handoff process. A recent PSNet interview discussed the weekend effect in health care.
Lo H-Y, Mullan PC, Lye C, et al. BMJ Qual Improv Rep. 2016;5.
Patient handoffs are vulnerable to errors of omission. This quality improvement project designed and implemented a checklist as a way to standardize the process of pediatric handoffs. The program found the tool to be effective in uncovering problems and physicians felt the checklist supported situational awareness and patient safety.
Destino LA, Dixit A, Pantaleoni JL, et al. Jt Comm J Qual Patient Saf. 2017;43:80-88.
Adverse events after hospital discharge are common. Prior research demonstrates that communication and information transfer between inpatient providers and primary care physicians (PCPs) may be lacking, raising patient safety concerns. This study described how applying Lean methodology, enhancing frontline provider engagement, and redesigning workflow processes within the electronic health record led to improved communication with PCPs around the time of hospital discharge. Through these interventions, the pediatric medical service was able to increase verbal communication with PCPs at discharge to 80%, and they sustained this for a 7-month period. Discharge communication with PCPs across other services improved as well. A previous PSNet perspective discussed the challenges associated with care transitions and suggested opportunities for improvement.