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The PSNet Collection: All Content

The AHRQ PSNet Collection comprises an extensive selection of resources relevant to the patient safety community. These resources come in a variety of formats, including literature, research, tools, and Web sites. Resources are identified using the National Library of Medicine’s Medline database, various news and content aggregators, and the expertise of the AHRQ PSNet editorial and technical teams.

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Displaying 1 - 20 of 58 Results
Perspective on Safety November 16, 2022

Dr. Pascale Carayon, PhD, is a professor emerita in the Department of Industrial and Systems Engineering and the founding director of the Wisconsin Institute for Healthcare Systems Engineering (WIHSE). Dr. Nicole Werner, PhD, is an associate professor in the Department of Health and Wellness Design at the Indiana University School of Public Health-Bloomington. We spoke with both of them about the role of human factors engineering has in improving healthcare delivery and its role in patient safety.

Curated Libraries
September 13, 2021
Ensuring maternal safety is a patient safety priority. This library reflects a curated selection of PSNet content focused on improving maternal safety. Included resources explore strategies with the potential to improve maternal care delivery and outcomes, such as high reliability, care standardization,teamwork, unit-based safety initiatives, and...
Arshad SA, Ferguson DM, Garcia EI, et al. J Surg Res. 2021;257:455-461.
Engaging patients and families is an important strategy in ensuring safe health care delivery. In this prospective, observational study, use of a parent-centered script did not improve parent engagement during the preinduction checklist and resulted in an expected decline in checklist adherence.  
Denson JL, Knoeckel J, Kjerengtroen S, et al. BMJ Qual Saf. 2019;29:250-259.
Handoffs are a vulnerable time for patients in which inadequate communication between providers can contribute to adverse outcomes; end-of-rotation handoffs have been found to put patients at even greater risk. Standardizing handoffs has been shown to improve patient safety. This single-center pilot study examined the impact of an ICU handoff intervention consisting of an in-person bedside handoff, a checklist, nursing involvement, and an education session. The authors found that the intervention was feasible to implement with high fidelity and did not improve length of stay or mortality.
Patient Safety Primer September 7, 2019
This Primer provides an overview of the history and current status of the patient safety field and key definitions and concepts. It links to other Patient Safety Primers that discuss the concepts in more detail.
Geneva, Switzerland: World Health Organization; 2019.
Reducing adverse medication events is a worldwide challenge. This collection of technical reports explores key areas of concern that require action at a system level to improve: high-alert medications, polypharmacy, and medication use at care transitions. Each monograph provides an overview of the topic as well as practical improvement approaches for patients, clinicians, and organizations.
WebM&M Case February 1, 2019
Following surgery under general anesthesia, a boy was extubated and brought to postanesthesia care unit (PACU). Due to the patient's age and length of the surgery, the PACU anesthesiologist ordered continuous pulse-oximetry monitoring for 24 hours. Deemed stable to leave the PACU, the boy was transported to the regular floor. When the nurse went to place the patient on pulse oximetry, she realized he was markedly hypoxic. She administered oxygen by face mask, but he became bradycardic and hypotensive and a code blue was called.
Gupta A, Harrod M, Quinn M, et al. Diagnosis (Berl). 2018;5:151-156.
This direct observation study of hospitalist teams on rounds and conducting follow-up work examined the interaction between systems problems and cognitive errors in diagnosis. Researchers found that information gaps related to electronic health records, challenges with handoffs, and time constraints all contributed to difficulties in diagnostic cognition. The authors suggest considering both systems and cognitive challenges to diagnosis in order to promote safety.
Lo H-Y, Mullan PC, Lye C, et al. BMJ Qual Improv Rep. 2016;5.
Patient handoffs are vulnerable to errors of omission. This quality improvement project designed and implemented a checklist as a way to standardize the process of pediatric handoffs. The program found the tool to be effective in uncovering problems and physicians felt the checklist supported situational awareness and patient safety.
Seferian EG, Jamal S, Clark K, et al. BMJ Qual Saf. 2014;23:690-7.
This quality improvement initiative used human factors approaches including failure mode and effect analysis, event review, and root cause analysis to successfully reduce the rate of specimen mislabeling in an inpatient setting. This study highlights the importance of re-examining longstanding work processes to augment safety.
Hilligoss B, Moffatt-Bruce SD. BMJ Qual Saf. 2014;23:528-33.
Communication failures at the time of patient handoffs have been frequently implicated in adverse events. Comparing how narrative modes of communication such as storytelling and structured tools like checklists can be utilized to augment information transfers in health care, this commentary advocates for more research into strategies to improve narrative thinking.
Guglielmi CL, Canacari EG, DuPree ES, et al. AORN J. 2014;99:783-794.
The Universal Protocol has been widely adopted in the decade since its release. Successful utilization of the protocol to prevent wrong-site surgery has been determined to extend beyond checklist use. This commentary features insights from a multidisciplinary panel on their experiences with time outs and why are still needed to ensure safety in surgery.
Treadwell JR, Lucas S, Tsou AY. BMJ Qual Saf. 2014;23:299-318.
Checklists have been responsible for some of the most remarkable successes of the patient safety era, particularly in improving safety for patients undergoing surgery. However, recent studies have raised concern that surgical checklists may not realize their promise in real-world settings. This systematic review, performed originally for the AHRQ Making Healthcare Safer II report, found broad evidence that surgical safety checklists (including the SURPASS checklist and the World Health Organization checklist) are effective at preventing intraoperative and postoperative complications. The review also identifies factors associated with successful implementation of the checklists, information that is essential in order to translate research findings into daily clinical practice.
Soong C, Daub S, Lee J, et al. J Hosp Med. 2013;8:444-9.
The hospital discharge process is often disorganized and lacks standardization. As a result, adverse events after hospital discharge are disturbingly common. This study reports on a multidisciplinary, collaborative effort—involving hospitalists, primary care physicians, home care and bedside nurses, and pharmacists—to develop a standardized hospital discharge checklist. The resulting tool is designed to be used daily during hospitalization as part of interprofessional discharge planning rounds and consists of seven domains that address key aspects of the hospital-to-home transition, including medication reconciliation and communication between physicians. Further validation will be required to demonstrate that this checklist can prevent adverse events in broad hospitalized patient populations.
Salzwedel C, Bartz H-J, Kühnelt I, et al. Int J Qual Health Care. 2013;25:176-81.
Implementing a checklist for post-surgical handoffs resulted in more information being included in the handoff, but on average, only about half of the checklist items were specifically discussed. Prior studies have also found lower than expected checklist adherence in real-world settings.
WebM&M Case May 1, 2012
After placing a central line in an elderly patient following a heart attack, a community hospital transferred him to a referral hospital for stenting of his coronary arteries. He was discharged to an assisted living facility 2 days later, with the central line still in place.