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The PSNet Collection: All Content

The AHRQ PSNet Collection comprises an extensive selection of resources relevant to the patient safety community. These resources come in a variety of formats, including literature, research, tools, and Web sites. Resources are identified using the National Library of Medicine’s Medline database, various news and content aggregators, and the expertise of the AHRQ PSNet editorial and technical teams.

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Displaying 1 - 20 of 170 Results
WebM&M Case September 27, 2023

A 42-year-old man with a history of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), alcohol use disorder and anxiety disorder, was seen in the emergency department (ED) after a high-risk suicide attempt by hanging. The patient was agitated and attempted to escape from the ED while on an involuntary psychiatric commitment. The ED staff treated him as a “routine boarder” awaiting an inpatient bed, with insufficiently robust behavioral monitoring.

WebM&M Case July 31, 2023

A 50-year-old unhoused patient presented to the Emergency Department (ED) for evaluation of abdominal pain, reportedly one day after swallowing multiple sharp objects. Based on the radiologic finding of an open safety pin or paper clip in the distal stomach, he was appropriately scheduled for urgent esophagogastroduodenoscopy and ordered to remain NPO (nothing by mouth) to reduce the risk of aspirating gastric contents.

Sedney CL, Dekeseredy P, Singh SA, et al. J Pain Symptom Manage. 2023;65:553-561.
Health professional stigma and bias towards patients with substance use disorders can impede the delivery of effective healthcare. In this qualitative analysis of medical records for 25 patients with opioid use disorder, researchers identified several markers of stigma which can impact care, including blame and stereotyping.
May 4, 2023
The implementation of effective patient safety initiatives is challenging due to the complexity of the health care environment. This curated library shares resources summarizing overarching ideas and strategies that can aid in successful program execution, establishment, and sustainability.
Perspective on Safety April 26, 2023

Throughout 2022, AHRQ PSNet has shared research that elucidates the complex nature of misdiagnosis and diagnostic safety. This Year in Review explores recent work in diagnostic safety and ways that greater safety may be promoted using tools developed to improve diagnostic practices.

Throughout 2022, AHRQ PSNet has shared research that elucidates the complex nature of misdiagnosis and diagnostic safety. This Year in Review explores recent work in diagnostic safety and ways that greater safety may be promoted using tools developed to improve diagnostic practices.

Emani S, Rodriguez JA, Bates DW. J Am Med Inform Assoc. 2023;30:995-999.
Electronic health records (EHR) are essential for recording patients' clinical data but may also perpetuate stigma, particularly for people of color. This article describes how the EHR can perpetuate individual, organizational, and structural racism and ways organizations, researchers, practitioners, and vendors can address racism.
Perspective on Safety March 21, 2023

Throughout 2022, the impact of system failures on healthcare workers was a recurrent theme of articles on AHRQ PSNet. This Year in Review explores these impacts and ways to support healthcare workers involved in a system failure.  

Throughout 2022, the impact of system failures on healthcare workers was a recurrent theme of articles on AHRQ PSNet. This Year in Review explores these impacts and ways to support healthcare workers involved in a system failure.  

Curated Libraries
March 8, 2023
Value as an element of patient safety is emerging as an approach to prioritize and evaluate improvement actions. This library highlights resources that explore the business case for cost effective, efficient and impactful efforts to reduce medical errors.
Curated Libraries
January 19, 2023
The Primary-Care Research in Diagnosis Errors (PRIDE) Learning Network was a Boston-based national effort to improve diagnostic safety. Hosted by the State of Massachusetts’ Betsy Lehman Center, it was led by the Harvard Brigham and Women’s Center for Patient Safety Research and Practice with funding from the Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation. ...
WebM&M Case December 14, 2022

A 65-year-old man with metastatic liver disease presented to the hospital with worsening abdominal pain after a partial hepatectomy and development of a large ventral hernia. Imaging studies revealed perforated diverticulitis. A goals-of-care discussion was led by the palliative care service; the patient and his designated decision-makers chose to pursue non-operative management of diverticulitis.

Perspective on Safety November 16, 2022

This piece focuses on human factors engineering including application of the SEIPS model to implement care transitions rooted in patient safety and the processes of care.

This piece focuses on human factors engineering including application of the SEIPS model to implement care transitions rooted in patient safety and the processes of care.

Pascale Carayon picture

Dr. Pascale Carayon, PhD, is a professor emerita in the Department of Industrial and Systems Engineering and the founding director of the Wisconsin Institute for Healthcare Systems Engineering (WIHSE). Dr. Nicole Werner, PhD, is an associate professor in the Department of Health and Wellness Design at the Indiana University School of Public Health-Bloomington. We spoke with both of them about the role of human factors engineering has in improving healthcare delivery and its role in patient safety.

Kawsar M, Linander I. Sex Reprod Healthc. 2022;34:100786.
Trans and gender-nonconforming (TGNC) people may delay or avoid seeking healthcare due to experiences with biased or uninformed providers. This study focuses specifically on obstetric and gynecological care providers who provide care to TGNC people. Participants described challenges at the clinic level (e.g., needing at least one knowledgeable and interested clinician) and administrative level (e.g., trans men who have a cervix do not get automatic reminders for PAP tests) that can prevent TGNC people from receiving equitable care.
Lagu T, Haywood C, Reimold KE, et al. Health Aff (Millwood). 2022;41:1387-1395.
People with disabilities face barriers to safe, equitable care such as inaccessible equipment and facilities or provider bias. In this study, primary care and specialist physicians described challenges with caring for patients with disabilities. Many expressed explicit biases such as reluctance to care for people with disabilities, invest in accessible equipment, or obtain continuing education to provide appropriate care.
Healy M, Richard A, Kidia K. J Gen Intern Med. 2022;37:2533-2540.
The language used in progress notes in the electronic health record (EHR) can influence the attitudes of and treatment given by subsequent clinicians. This review describes words and phrases that are stigmatizing and provides neutral alternatives (e.g., person with substance use disorder instead of addict). Patients in minoritized groups may be especially impacted by stigmatizing language in progress notes.   
Curated Libraries
October 10, 2022
Selected PSNet materials for a general safety audience focusing on improvements in the diagnostic process and the strategies that support them to prevent diagnostic errors from harming patients.

Tahir D. Kaiser Health News. September 26, 2022. 

Negative patient representations in medical records perpetuate stereotypes that can affect care over time. This story discusses how written notes using stigmatizing language reflect bias and physician disrespect that serve as clues to misdiagnosis. Black patients and those patients named as "difficult" were particularly vulnerable to damaging representation in notes.
Sabin JA. N Engl J Med. 2022;387:105-107.
Implicit bias in clinicians can result in diagnostic errors and poor patient outcomes. This commentary outlines steps that individual clinicians, as well as healthcare systems, can take to reduce implicit bias and the resulting harm to patients.

Villarosa L. New York, NT: Doubleday: 2022. ISBN 9780385544887. 

Health inequities are receiving increased attention as a patient safety issue. This book examines the persistent problem of systemic racism on the health of Black patients. It summarizes the evidence on how racism affects health care and discusses strategies for improvement such as reducing gaps in implicit bias content in curriculum.