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Zipperer L, Ryan R, Jones B. J Patient Saf Risk Manag. 2022;Epub Aug 2.
Implicit biases and stigma can negatively impact health care provided to patients with substance use disorders such as alcohol use disorder (AUD). This narrative review concluded that patients with AUD are frequently undiagnosed and not appropriately referred for treatment or treated. The authors cite barriers to effective care for patients with AUD, including poor integration and coordination between medical care and behavioral health care in the United States.

ECHO-Care Transitions (ECHO-CT) intends to ensure continuity of care and alleviate the risk of patient safety issues, notably medication errors, occurring because of hospital transition. With funding from the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center (BIDMC) adapted Project Extension for Community Healthcare Outcomes (ECHO) to connect receiving multidisciplinary skilled nursing facility (SNF) teams with a multidisciplinary team at the discharging hospital.

Morris S, O’Hara J. Pharmacuetical Journal. February 26, 2021.

It is a challenge to track medical errors that take place in the home environment, yet it is understood they happen and can cause harm. This article discusses errors that parents make in providing medications to their children. The authors advocate for engaging parents as partners to improve care safety in the home.

After a breast mass was identified by a physician assistant during a routine visit, a 60-year-old woman received a diagnostic mammogram and ultrasound. The radiology assessment was challenging due to dense breast tissue and ultimately interpreted as “probably benign” findings. When the patient returned for follow-up 5 months later, the mass had increased in size and she was referred for a biopsy.

Lerner JE, Martin JI, Gorsky GS. Sex Res Social Pol. 2020;18:409-426.
This study used national survey data to examine avoidance of healthcare services among transgender, gender nonconforming, and non-binary people. Researchers found that nearly one quarter of respondents reported not seeking healthcare when necessary because they anticipated being disrespected or mistreated by healthcare professionals. Previous experience with certain discriminatory behavior such as invasive questions, refusal of care, verbal harassment, as well as cost and needing to educate providers, were strong predictors of healthcare avoidance.