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The PSNet Collection: All Content

The AHRQ PSNet Collection comprises an extensive selection of resources relevant to the patient safety community. These resources come in a variety of formats, including literature, research, tools, and Web sites. Resources are identified using the National Library of Medicine’s Medline database, various news and content aggregators, and the expertise of the AHRQ PSNet editorial and technical teams.

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Displaying 1 - 17 of 17 Results
Minyé HM, Benjamin EM. Br Dent J. 2022;232:879-885.
High reliability organization (HRO) principles used in other high-risk industries (such as aviation) can be applied patient safety. This article provides an overview of how HRO principles (preoccupation with failure, situational awareness, reluctance to simplify, deference to expertise, and commitment to resilience) can be successfully applied in dentistry.
Yansane A, Tokede O, Walji MF, et al. J Patient Saf. 2021;17:e1050-e1056.
Clinician burnout is a known threat to patient safety. This survey of a national sample of dentists found that approximately 1 in 10 respondents reported high levels of burnout and 50% of respondents reported a perceived dental error in the last 6 months. Efforts to minimize burnout among dentists may help improve patient safety.
Weenink J-W, Wallenburg I, Leistikow I, et al. BMJ Qual Saf. 2021;30:804-811.
This qualitative study explored the impact of published inspection frameworks on quality and safety in nursing home care, dental care, and hospital care. Respondents noted the importance of the inspection framework design, the role of existing institutional frameworks, and how the frameworks can influence quality improvement across various organizational levels.
Bailey E, Dungarwalla M. Prim Dent J. 2021;10:89-95.
Research into patient safety culture in primary dental care remains limited. This commentary provides an overview of patient safety in dentistry and tools to develop a robust patient safety culture, including human factors and supporting second victims.

Coulthard P, Thomson P, Dave M, et al. Br Dent J. 2020;229:743-747; 801-805.  

The COVID-19 pandemic suspended routine dental care. This two-part series discusses the clinical challenges facing the provision of routine dental care during the pandemic (Part 1) and the medical, legal, and economic consequences of withholding or delaying dental care (Part 2).  
Obadan-Udoh E, Panwar S, Yansane A-I, et al. J Evid Based Dent Pract. 2020;20:101424.
Patient safety events are common in dentistry. A survey administered to adult dental patients found that a majority of them were concerned about their safety at the dental office but that those concerns were not routinely shared with dental providers or clinic staff. Efforts to improve patient engagement and speaking up behaviors can improve safety in dentistry.
Perea-Pérez B, Labajo-González E, Acosta-Gío AE, et al. J Patient Saf. 2020;16.
Based on malpractice claims data in Spain, the authors propose eleven recommendations to mitigate preventable adverse events in dentistry. These recommendations include developing a culture of safety, improving the quality of clinical records, safe prescribing practices, using checklists in oral surgical procedures, and having an action plan for life-threatening emergencies in the dental clinic.
Graham C, Reid S, Lord TC, et al. Br Dent J. 2019;226:32-38.
Reporting and avoidance of “never events,” such as a wrong tooth extraction, is important for providing consistently safe dental care. This article describes changes made in safety procedures, including introducing surgical safety briefings or huddles in an outpatient oral surgery unit of the United Kingdom’s National Health Service, that eliminated never events for more than two years.
Stahl JM, Mack K, Cebula S, et al. Mil Med. 2019.
This retrospective study of dental patient safety reports in the military health system demonstrated an increase in reported events, which may reflect improvements in safety culture. Wrong-site surgery was the most common adverse event, suggesting the need to enhance safety practices in dentistry.
Plessas A, Nasser M, Hanoch Y, et al. J Dent. 2019;82:38-44.
This randomized simulation study examined the performance of dentists on a clinical diagnostic task—interpretation of dental radiographs with and without time pressure. Dentists identified abnormal findings more frequently when they did not feel time pressure, suggesting that time pressure adversely impacted their diagnostic acumen.
Stocks SJ, Donnelly A, Esmail A, et al. BMJ Open. 2018;8:e020952.
Adverse events reported by patients are often different and more expansive than safety hazards identified by health care providers. Researchers elicited adverse events from a nationally representative sample of British outpatients. About 8% of patients reported an adverse event, which were frequently problems with medications, accessing care in a timely way, and diagnostic errors.
Gupta N, Vujicic M, Blatz A. J Am Dent Assoc. 2018;149:237-245.e6.
This analysis of claims data from insurers found that rates of opioid prescribing following dental procedures increased between 2010 and 2015. The sharpest rise occurred among 11–18 year olds, and nearly one-third of opioid prescriptions were not associated with surgical procedures. The authors urge limiting use of opioids for nonsurgical dental visits.
Bailey E, Tickle M, Campbell S, et al. BMC Oral Health. 2015;15:152.
This systematic review of patient safety in dentistry found scant evidence for effective patient safety approaches, with the exception of surgical safety checklists, which were successful in preventing wrong tooth extractions. Further research is needed to characterize patient safety in dentistry and implement effective interventions.
Ramoni R, Walji MF, Tavares A, et al. J Dent Edu. 2014;78:745-756.
Researchers administered the AHRQ Medical Office Survey on Patient Safety Culture at three dental schools in the United States and determined that safety culture in dentistry is lacking. A past AHRQ WebM&M commentary describes a wrong-site dental surgery and recommends strategies to reduce risk of errors in this setting.