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The PSNet Collection: All Content

The AHRQ PSNet Collection comprises an extensive selection of resources relevant to the patient safety community. These resources come in a variety of formats, including literature, research, tools, and Web sites. Resources are identified using the National Library of Medicine’s Medline database, various news and content aggregators, and the expertise of the AHRQ PSNet editorial and technical teams.

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Displaying 1 - 10 of 10 Results

The APSF Committee on Technology. APSF Newsletter2022;37(1):7–8.

Variation across standards and processes can result in misunderstandings that disrupt care safety. This guidance applied expert consensus to examine existing anesthesia monitoring standards worldwide. Recommendations are provided for organizations and providers to guide anesthesia practice in a variety of environments to address patient safety issues including accidental patient awareness during surgery.
Kowalczyk L.
Certain elements of the ambulatory surgery environment can increase risk of adverse events. Reporting on a series of patient injuries linked to a contracted anesthesiologist at a cataract surgery center, this news article describes how factors such as production pressure and insufficient assessment of contract anesthesiologists' qualifications can contribute to adverse events in outpatient surgery.
Hartocollis A; Goodman JD.
Office-based anesthesia is becoming more common despite concerns regarding its safety. This newspaper article reports on factors to enhance safety of surgical care in ambulatory settings, such as adequate screening of patient risks, availability of staff trained to perform intubations when needed, and ensuring access to lifesaving equipment as strategies.
Lord T. Patient Saf Qual Healthc. March/April 2012;9:38-41,44.
This article details how miscommunication and lack of patient-centered care contributed to errors that led to the death of a child.