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1 - 11 of 11
Ricci-Cabello I, Gangannagaripalli J, Mounce LTA, et al. J Patient Saf. 2021;17:e20-e27.
Patient safety in primary care is an emerging focus. This cross-sectional study across primary care clinics in England explored the main factors contributing to patient-reported harm experiences. Factors included incidents related to communication, care coordination, and incorrect or delayed; diagnosis and/or treatment.
White AA, Sage WM, Mazor KM, et al. Jt Comm J Qual Patient Saf. 2020;46:591-595.
This commentary discusses safety outcomes associated with late career practitioners, measuring practitioner performance, and options for practitioners with declining performance, including key features and lessons learned from early adopters of late career practitioner programs.
Aaron M, Webb A, Luhanga U. J Grad Med Educ. 2020;12:415-424.
In this narrative review, the authors examined current literature on effective strategies to increase patient safety event reporting among residents and trainees. The most sustainable interventions combined strategies that successfully minimized physician involvement time, incorporated accessible event reporting into existing electronic health record systems, and became integrated into the normal patient care workflow. The authors also noted a lack of studies involving residents and trainees in root cause analysis following event reporting.
Rooney D, Barrett K, Bufford B, et al. J Patient Saf. 2020;16:e126-e130.
This study reviewed adverse event reporting forms from 16 dental schools and found that the forms were not standardized in structure, organization, or content. Adoption of a standardized method for event collection and assessment would allow for quality improvement and increase patient safety.
Logan MS, Myers LC, Salmasian H, et al. J Patient Saf. 2021;17:e1726-e1731.
This article describes an innovative expert consensus process to generate a contemporary list of chart-review based triggers and adverse event measures for assessing the incidence of inpatient and outpatient adverse events. A panel of 71 experts from nine institutions identified 218 triggers and measures with high or very high clinical importance deemed suitable for chart review and 198 were found suitable for electronic surveillance; 192 items were suitable for both.   
Covin Y, Longo P, Wick N, et al. Diagnosis (Berl). 2020;8:161-166.
As one strategy to improve diagnosis, this article describes the use of computerized case presentations and facilitated discussions (based on the National Academy of Medicine diagnostic process framework) for teaching diagnostic reasoning education to clerkship and preclinical medical students.  
Kolla BP, Coombes BJ, Morgenthaler TI, et al. J Gen Intern Med. 2020;36:51-54.
This observational study observed nonsignificant increases in patient safety incidents in the week following the transition into and out of daylight savings time (DST) over an eight-year period. The authors suggest policymakers and health system leadership evaluate risk mitigation strategies such as delayed shift start times during the transition to and from DST.
Patel AG, Pizzitola VJ, Johnson CD, et al. Radiology. 2020;297:374-379.
The authors analyzed CT interpretation errors committed by radiology fellows working off-hours over a four-year period and found that interpretation errors occurred more frequently at night and in the latter half of night assignments.  
Musunur S, Waineo E, Walton E, et al. Acad Psychiatry. 2020;44:586-591.
This article describes the impact of an interactive session with second-year medical students utilizing case-based learning, small group discussion, and video vignettes intended to prepare healthcare providers to anticipate and understand the impact of medical errors. Pre- and post-surveys found that this one-hour, small-group session increased medical students’ understanding of the impact of medical errors and adverse events and the resources available to support providers.