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Gillies D, Chicop D, O'Halloran P. Crisis. 2015;36:316-324.
This study used root cause analysis to identify underlying causes of suicide among mental health service clients. Researchers found that most patients had denied suicidal ideation and had missed follow-up in their mental health care. Their results underscore the challenge of preventing suicide in patients with mental illness.
Allan J, Ball P, Alston M. Rural Remote Health. 2008;8:835.
Drawing from qualitative interviews with pharmacists and social workers, investigators determined that access to rural health services is affected by individual concerns about privacy and confidentiality, and by the reputation and value system of the health care worker.
Jones D, Baldwin I, McIntyre T, et al. Qual Saf Health Care. 2006;15:427-32.
Medical emergency teams (METs, also known as rapid response teams) are being widely implemented in U.S. hospitals. Although their effectiveness in preventing adverse patient outcomes is uncertain, a major proposed benefit of such teams is to provide support for nursing staff. This study, conducted at an Australian hospital with a long-standing MET, surveyed ward nurses to determine if they understood the appropriate reasons to call the MET and evaluate if they felt the MET improved patient safety. Nearly all nurses felt the team helped provide more effective care for patients and helped educate nurses in caring for acutely ill patients. Nurses did not feel that they would be criticized for calling the MET. Despite the presence of objective criteria (eg, vital sign abnormalities) for calling the MET, most nurses preferred to use their clinical judgment to decide when to summon the team.
Johnstone M-J, Kanitsaki O. Int J Qual Health Care. 2006;18:383-8.
The authors discuss the importance of understanding the relationship between culture, language, and patient safety and stress that not sufficiently addressing this relationship may put minority patients at risk for adverse events.