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Herledan C, Baudouin A, Larbre V, et al. Support Care Cancer. 2020;28:3557-3569.
This systematic review synthesizes the evidence from 14 studies on medication reconciliation in cancer patients. While the majority of studies did not include a contemporaneous comparison group, they did report that medication reconciliation led to medication error identification (most frequently drug omissions, additions or dosage errors) in up to 88-95% of patients.
Kattel S, Manning DM, Erwin PJ, et al. J Patient Saf. 2020;16.
Prior research has found poor communication between hospital-based and primary care physicians and has suggested that this may contribute to medical errors. This systematic review included 19 studies assessing the transfer of information at hospital discharge between hospital-based and primary care providers (PCPs), or evaluating interventions aimed at improving the timeliness and quality of discharge information. The review found that timely communication of discharge summaries was low, with 55% (median) transferred to PCPs within 48 hours and 85% (median) within 4-weeks; 8.5% of discharge summaries were never transferred. Discharge summaries nearly always contained patient demographics, admission/discharge dates and primary diagnoses, but less frequently included pending test results, diagnostic tests performed and discharge medications.
Maxwell J, Bourgoin A, Crandall J. Rockville, MD : Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality; 2020.
Project RED re-engineered discharge with the goal of reducing preventable readmissions. This report summarizes an Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality project to transfer the Project RED experience to the primary care environment. Areas of focus included enhancing the team leader role of primary care physicians in post-discharge care.