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1 - 16 of 16
Flatten M. Washington Examiner. August 18–22, 2014.
This series offers five magazine articles exploring how diagnostic error, delayed treatment, and insufficient attention to patient concerns and medical history within the Veterans Affairs health system contributed to preventable harm and death.

Landro L. Wall Street Journal. June 9, 2014.

As they become more prevalent, electronic medical records (EMRs) are being used to improve safety in increasingly creative ways. This newspaper article reports on efforts to engage patients in reviewing their medication lists by providing them with access to EMR systems in order to detect and correct discrepancies in data.
Lerner BH.
The author reviews the legacy of Libby Zion and how her untimely death raised awareness of the impact that resident duty hours and fatigue could have on patient care and quality.
This series includes articles on "doorway diagnosis" (or a doctor's assessment of a patient before an exam begins), anesthesiologists addicted to painkillers, and medical mistakes in the emergency room.
Feldman R
In this article, a nurse shares her firsthand account of what it was like to be a surgical patient and the surprising safety and quality shortcomings she encountered during her hospital stay.
With no one to interpret for them and pharmacy instructions printed only in English, non–English-speaking parents give their child a 12.5-fold overdose of a medication.

Robins NS. New York NY: Delacorte Press; 1995. ISBN: 9780385308090. 

Robins, an investigative journalist, recounts the story of Libby Zion, who died at New York Hospital in 1984 allegedly at the hands of under-supervised and overworked residents. The book is an interesting and engaging account of a case and its aftermath, including the highly publicized malpractice trial and the formation of the Bell Commission, which regulated resident work-hours for the first time. The book provides an important historical context for this case and the debate surrounding it, the implications of which are still being felt today in the wake of national regulations for resident duty-hours.