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Lackie K, Hayward K, Ayn C, et al. J Interprof Care. 2022;Epub Apr 11.
Health profession schools are increasingly using interprofessional simulation-based education (IP-SBE) for learners to understand each other’s roles in team-based care. Learners’ ability to feel psychologically safe during IP-SBE is necessary for full learner participation. This scoping review analyzed 27 studies of psychological safety within IP-SBE. Learners were more likely to feel safe in well-designed simulations with facilitators who are experienced in pre- and de-briefing. Barriers to psychological safety included hierarchy, being observed, uncertainty, and poorly designed and delivered simulations.
White AA, King AM, D’Addario AE, et al. JMIR Med Educ. 2022;8:e30988.
Communication with patients and caregivers is important after a diagnostic error. Using a simulated case involving delayed diagnosis of breast cancer, this study compared how crowdsourced laypeople and patient advocates rate physician disclosure communication skills. Findings suggest that patient advocates rate communication skills more stringently than laypeople, but laypeople can correctly identify physicians with high and low communication skills.
Hansen M, Harrod T, Bahr N, et al. Acad Med. 2022;97:696-703.
Strong physician leadership during clinical crisis can help improve patient outcomes. In this randomized controlled trial, obstetrics-gynecology and emergency medicine residents participated in one of three study arms using high-fidelity mannequins. One study arm received a bespoke leadership curriculum, one received a modified version TeamSTEPPS curriculum, and the third received no leadership training. Participants in both curriculum arms improved leadership scores from “average” before the training to “good” following the training and continuing to six months. The control arm remained unchanged at “average” before and after.

This WebM&M describes two cases involving patients who became unresponsive in unconventional locations – inside of a computed tomography (CT) scanner and at an outpatient transplant clinic – and strategies to ensure that all healthcare teams are prepared to deliver advanced cardiac life support (ACLS), such as the use of mock codes and standardized ACLS algorithms. 

Lee EH, Pitts S, Pignataro S, et al. Clin Teach. 2022;19:71-78.
The inherent power imbalance between supervisors and new clinicians may inhibit new clinicians from asking questions or reporting mistakes. This lack of psychological safety can result in patient harm and restrict learning. This article provides strategies for healthcare educators and leaders to model and guide a safer organization. Three phases of the supervisor-learner relationship, along with suggested prompts, are provided.

Rockville, MD; Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality: April 2022.

TeamSTEPPS promotes effective teamwork, collaboration, and communication in health care while focusing on strategies known to improve patient safety. This challenge competition seeks submissions to revise existing TeamSTEPPS videos to improve health literacy, equity, and cultural sensitivity. Written proposals are due June 20, 2022.

Arnetz JE. Jt Comm J Qual Patient Saf. 2022;48(4):241-245.

Patient violence toward health care workers is a common, yet underreported, influence on care safety. This commentary summarizes policies in place to address patient violence and highlights Joint Commission standards developed to reduce the potential for violence in care environments. Improved reporting, organizational engagement, and safety culture development are among the strategies recommended.
Montgomery A, Lainidi O. Front Psychiatry. 2022;13:818393.
Difficulty speaking up about patient safety concerns and unprofessional behavior indicates a safety culture deficiency. This article discusses the relationship between silence, burnout, and quality of care, emphasizing how silence evolves during medical education and continues into clinical training, eventually impacting healthcare professional burnout, patient safety and quality of care.

Doty MM, Horstman C, Shah A et al. Issue Brief. New York, NY: Commonwealth Fund: April 2022.

Bias in any form degrades the safety and effectiveness of communication and care. This report summarizes data documenting the impact of racial and ethnic discrimination on older adult patients. It provides recommendations that include increasing content in medical school curriculum to raise awareness of biased medical care and tailoring communication needs to ethnic communities as steps toward reducing discrimination.
Staal J, Speelman M, Brand R, et al. BMC Med Educ. 2022;22:256.
Diagnostic safety is an essential component of medical training. In this study, medical interns reviewed six clinical cases in which the referral letters from the general practitioner suggested a correct diagnosis, an incorrect diagnosis, or lacked a diagnostic suggestion. Researchers found that diagnostic suggestions in the referral letter did not influence subsequent diagnostic accuracy but did reduce the number of diagnoses considered.  
Society for Simulation in Healthcare.
Simulation provides a safe space to observe behaviors and generate constructive feedback to enhance individual and team performance. This website provides promotional materials for an annual campaign to raise awareness of professionals that use simulation to develop teamwork, communication, and crisis management skills in health care. The 2022 observance will be held September 12-16.

Olson APJ, Danielson J, Stanley J, et al. Rockville, MD: Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality; March 2022. AHRQ Publication No. 22-0026-1-EF

Diagnostic skill development begins early in the education of health professionals. Advocates suggest that adjustments be made in curricula, instruction, and student assessment to address gaps in current educational methods and to enhance the team-focused diagnosis. This issue brief is part of a series on diagnostic safety.
AHA Training. May 16-17, 2022, Founders Room, University of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA.
This education program will present group-focused opportunities for participants to learn how to apply Agency for Healthcare Quality and Research TeamSTEPPS 2.0 curriculum methods to develop staff training and improve team communication in their organizations.
Cheng MKW, Collins S, Baron RB, et al. J Grad Med Educ. 2021;13:822-832.
The Clinical Learning Environment Review (CLER) program identified that resident involvement in interprofessional (IP) quality improvement and patient safety (QIPS) efforts was lacking and called for improvement. Interviews with residents, faculty, and staff were held to determine the status of IP QIPS in their hospital. Benefits (e.g., (learning about other professions), facilitators, and barriers to resident involvement and a positive clinical learning environment were identified.
World Health Organization. September 17, 2022.
Patients, families, and providers around the world are affected by medical error. This annual event and associated materials seek to raise awareness, motivate collaboration, and stimulate innovative work targeting a distinct patient safety theme. The 2022 theme is “Medication safety” with the slogan “Medication without Harm".
Dennison S, Freeman M, Giannotti N, et al. Nurse Educ. 2022;Epub Feb 2.
Reporting medication errors and near misses should be taught to prelicensure nursing students but is not always included in nursing programs. This quality improvement project focused on the near-miss medication error reporting by student nurses. The authors found that dosing errors were 81% of the incidents, but there were multiple contributing factors including communication, competency and education, environmental and human limitations, and policies and procedures. The findings can be helpful to other nursing programs to refocus education on medication errors to areas were students have problems.
Dekhtyar M, Park YS, Kalinyak J, et al. Diagnosis. (Berl). 2022;9:69-76.
Standardized and virtual patient encounters are often used to develop medical and nursing students’ diagnostic reasoning. Through educational interventions including virtual patients, medical students increased their diagnostic accuracy compared to baseline and the completeness and efficiency in the differential diagnosis increased.
Vela MB, Erondu AI, Smith NA, et al. Annu Rev Public Health. 2022;43.
Implicit biases among healthcare providers can contribute to poor decision-making and impede safe, effective care. This systematic review assessed the efficacy of interventions designed to reduce explicit and implicit biases among healthcare providers and students. The researchers found that many interventions can increase awareness of implicit biases among participants, but no intervention achieved sustained reduction of implicit biases. The authors propose a conceptual model illustrating interactions between structural determinants (e.g., social determinants of health, language concordance, biased learning environments) and provider implicit bias.
Schiff GD, Volodarskaya M, Ruan E, et al. JAMA Netw Open. 2022;5:e2144531.
Improving diagnosis is a patient safety priority. Using data from patient safety incident reports, malpractice claims, morbidity and mortality reports, and focus group responses, this study sought to identify “diagnostic pitfalls,” defined as clinical situations vulnerable to errors which may lead to diagnostic errors. The authors identified 21 generic diagnostic pitfall categories involving six different aspects of the clinical interaction – diagnosis and assessment, history and physical, testing, communication, follow-up, and other pitfalls (e.g., problems with inappropriate referral, urgency of the clinical situation not appreciated). The authors suggest that these findings can inform education and quality improvement efforts to anticipate and prevent future errors.