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Schaffer AC, Babayan A, Einbinder JS, et al. Obstet Gynecol. 2021;138(2):246-252.
Adverse events in obstetrics threaten the safety of both maternal and infant patients. This study identified a significant reduction in malpractice claims among obstetrician-gynecologists after participation in simulation training focused on team training and crisis management.

Graber ML, Schrandt S. Evanston, IL:  Society to Improve Diagnosis in Medicine;  September 8, 2021. 

This report summarizes the results of a project that examined how the literature and various stakeholders consider challenges and opportunities for improving diagnosis during telemedicine interactions. Both areas of concern and potential were highlighted to engage researchers, educators, and clinicians in the implementation and use of telediagnosis that is safe and of high-value for patients and families.
Kwok CS, Bennett S, Azam Z, et al. Crit Pathw Cardiol. 2021;20(3):155-162.
Misdiagnosis of cardiovascular conditions can lead to serious patient harm. This systematic review found that misdiagnosis of acute myocardial infarction (AMI) occurs in approximately 1-2% of cases, and AMI is commonly diagnosed as other heart conditions, musculoskeletal pain, or gastrointestinal disease. The authors suggest that there are opportunities to reduce cases of missed AMI with better education about atypical symptoms and improved training of electrocardiogram interpretation.

King AE, Gerolamo AM, Hass RW, et al. J Allied Health. 2021;50(3):175-181.

Teamwork is essential for effective care coordination and patient safety. This study found that this specific educational intervention (TeamSAFE, which consisted of an online learning module and in-person interprofessional teamwork simulations) for medical, nursing, and allied health students improved knowledge of teamwork skills, increased understanding of the roles and responsibilities of different health professions, and the importance of patient safety.  
Burke HB, King HB. BMJ Open. 2021;11(9):e040779.
This study of US primary care physicians tested their patient safety and quality knowledge. Five topic areas were assessed: 1) patient management, 2) radiation risk, 3) general safety and quality, 4) structure, process, and outcome, and, 5) quality and safety definitions. The average score was 48% correct, indicating additional education in patient safety and quality for practicing primary care physicians is needed.
Barber Doucet H, Ward VL, Johnson TJ, et al. Clin Pediatr (Phila). 2021;60(9-10):408-417.
Healthcare provider implicit biases can lead to inequitable care delivery and poorer patient outcomes. Pediatric residents were surveyed about their attitudes, skill level, and preferred educational interventions related to implicit bias and care of diverse populations. Prior medical education or training in diversity and bias-related skills was associated with higher self-reported skill level.
Sidi A, Gravenstein N, Vasilopoulos T, et al. J Patient Saf. 2021;17(6):e490-e496.
Nontechnical skills, such as teamwork and communication, can influence performance in technical fields like surgery or emergency medicine. This study found that simulation-based assessments can measure improvements in nontechnical skills and cognitive performance among residents.
Van Slambrouck L, Verschueren R, Seys D, et al. J Prof Nurs. 2021;37(4):765-770.
An online survey of nursing students in Belgium found that about one in three students were involved in a patient safety incident during their clinical training, and the majority experienced emotional distress after the event. Medical and nursing curriculum should include opportunities for competency development to support peers involved in patient safety incidents.
Warm EJ, Ahmad Y, Kinnear B, et al. Acad Med. 2021;96(9):1268-1275.
Technical and procedural skills are an important emphasis of medical training. This article briefly summarizes the “as low as reasonably achievable” (ALARA) approach, which was developed for the nuclear industry and has been used in radiology. The authors outline how ALARA risk standards can be adapted by training program directors to measure procedural competency and assess and reduce bedside procedural risks.
Siebert JN, Bloudeau L, Combescure C, et al. JAMA Netw Open. 2021;4(8):e2123007.
Medication errors are common in pediatric patients who require care from emergency medical services. This randomized trial measured the impact of a mobile app in reducing medication errors during simulated pediatric out-of-hospital cardiac arrest scenarios. Advanced paramedics were exposed to a standardized video simulation of an 18-month of child with cardiac arrest and tested on sequential preparations of intravenous emergency drugs of varying degrees of difficulty with or without mobile app support. Compared with conventional drug preparation methods, use of the mobile app significantly decreased the rate of medication errors and time to drug delivery.
Jagneaux T, Caffery TS, Musso MW, et al. J Patient Saf. 2021;17(6):425-429.
Emergency and internal medicine residents attended a course on central venous access that included lectures, videos, and simulation using a task trainer. Comparison of pre- and post-training evaluation demonstrated significant improvement in knowledge, confidence, and procedural skills.
Mirarchi FL, Cammarata C, Cooney TE, et al. J Patient Saf. 2021;17(6):458-466.
Prior research found significant confusion among physicians in understanding Physician Orders for Life-Sustaining Treatment (POLST) documents, which can lead to errors. This study found that emergency medical services (EMS) personnel did not exhibit adequate understanding of all POLST or living will documents either. The researchers propose that patient video messaging can increase clarity about treatment, and preserve patient safety and autonomy.

Ensuring maternal safety is a patient safety priority. This library reflects a curated selection of PSNet content focused on improving maternal safety. Included resources explore strategies with the potential to improve maternal care delivery and outcomes, such as high reliability, care standardization, teamwork, unit-based safety initiatives, and trigger tools.

Fatima S, Soria S, Esteban- Cruciani N. BMC Med Educ. 2021;21(1):408.
Healthcare providers who are involved in a medical error and feel guilt, remorse, shame, and anger are sometimes referred to as “second victims”. This mixed-methods study surveyed medical residents about their well-being, coping strategies, and support following a self-perceived medical error. Residents reported feeling fear, shame, and feeling judged, and many used maladaptive strategies to cope.
Gleason KT, Commodore-Mensah Y, Wu AW, et al. Nurse Educ Today. 2021;104:104984.
Massive online open courses (MOOCs) have the ability to reach a broad audience of learners. The Science of Safety in Healthcare MOOC was delivered in 2013 and 2014. At completion of the course, participants reported increased confidence on all six measured domains (teamwork, communication, managing risk, human environment, recognizing and responding, and culture). At 6 months post-completion, the majority agreed the content was useful and positively influenced their clinical practice, demonstrating that MOOCs are an effective interprofessional learning format.
Liese KL, Davis-Floyd R, Stewart K, et al. Anthropol Med. 2021;28(2):188-204.
This article draws on interviews and observations to explore medical iatrogenesis in obstetric care. The authors discuss how various factors – such as universal management plans, labor and delivery interventions, and informed consent – contribute to iatrogenic harm and worse perinatal outcomes for racial/ethnic minority patients.
Petrosoniak A, Fan M, Hicks CM, et al. BMJ Qual Saf. 2021;30(9):739-746.
Trauma resuscitation is a complex, specialized process with a high risk for errors. Researchers analyzed videotapes of in situ simulations to evaluate latent safety events occurring during trauma resuscitation. Themes influencing latent safety events related to physical workspace, mental model formation, equipment, unclear accountability, demands exceeding individuals’ capacity, and task-specific issues.
Speaks L, Helmer SD, Quinn KR, et al. J Surg Educ. 2021;Epub Aug 4.
Balancing resident autonomy and supervision is an ongoing challenge in medical training. The authors reviewed patient data to identify adverse outcomes (e.g., complications, readmissions, reoperation, mortality) undergoing common general surgery procedures performed by, or indirectly supervised by, attending surgeons or the chief resident service. Findings suggest that indirect supervision of appendectomies, cholecystectomies, and hernia repairs by the chief resident surgery service is safe and can serve as a model to enhance resident autonomy during training.