Skip to main content

All Content

Search Tips
Save
Selection
Format
Download
Published Date
Original Publication Date
Original Publication Date
PSNet Publication Date
Additional Filters
1 - 20 of 71

The medication-use process is highly complex with many steps and risk points for error, and those errors are a key target for improving safety. This Library reflects a curated selection of PSNet content focused on medication and drug errors. Included resources explore understanding harms from preventable medication use, medication safety improvement strategies, and resources for design.

Carvalho IV, Sousa VM de, Visacri MB, et al. Pediatr Emerg Care. 2021;37(4):e152-e158.
This study sought to determine the rate of pediatric emergency department (ED) visits due to adverse drug events (ADE). Of 1,708 pediatric patients, 12.3% were admitted to the ED due to ADEs, with the highest rates of admission due to neurological, dermatological, and respiratory medications. The authors recommend the involvement of clinical pharmacists to prevent and identify ADEs in the pediatric population, particularly through education of children’s caregivers and health professionals.
Canadian Patient Safety Institute;
Patient stories and insights related to medical mishaps can inspire and motivate work to enhance health care safety. This annual podcast series uses patient accounts of medical errors to collaboratively explore solutions with health care providers.
Agarwal M, Lovegrove MC, Geller RJ, et al. J Pediatr. 2020;219.
Parents are advised to keep medications inaccessible to young children to avoid accidental ingestions. This study prospectively enrolled nearly 4,500 individuals calling poison control centers about unsupervised solid dose medication exposure in young children (ages 5 years and younger) to identify the types of containers from which young children accessed these medications. The majority of incidents (71.6%) involved children 2 years and younger. Incidents were equally divided among calls involving prescription-only medications, over-the-counter (OTC) projects requiring child-resistant packaging, and OTC projects not requiring such packaging. One-third of all incidents involved medication that had been removed from the original container; this was more likely in incidents involving prescription drugs compared to OTC drugs (adjusted odds ratio, 3.39; 95% CI, 2.87-4.00).  These findings suggest that unsupervised medication exposures in young children are just as often the result of adults removing medications from original packaging as the result of improper use or failure of child-resistant packaging.
Harrisburg, PA: Patient Safety Authority. ISSN 2641-4716.
The Pennsylvania Patient Safety Authority is a long-established source of patient safety data analysis and application-focused commentary. Their publishing output aims to generate improvements in their state as well as throughout health care. This open-access publication replaces the quarterly Pennsylvania Patient Safety Advisory newsletter.
King L, Peacock G, Crotty M, et al. Health Expect. 2019;22:385-395.
Patients and families have the potential to help medical teams proactively detect clinical deteriorations. This qualitative study with consumer advocates resulted in a comprehensive model for empowering patients to accurately activate rapid response systems.
Austin M; Derk J; Armstrong Institute for Patient Safety and Quality; Johns Hopkins Medicine.
Measures help track gaps in process and evidence of safety improvements. This white paper examines the performance of hospitals receiving Hospital Safety Grades and the relationship between high-level recognition and preventable harm. The report estimates that a substantial number of lives could have been saved if performance metrics had been met, but concludes that even high-performing hospitals exhibit areas in need of improvement.
Gabler E.
Pediatric cardiac surgery is highly technical and risky. This newspaper article reports on a poorly performing pediatric cardiac surgery program, concerns raised by staff, and insufficient response from organizational leadership. Lack of data transparency, insufficient resources, and limited program capabilities to support a complex program contributed to poor outcomes for pediatric patients.
Sutton E, Brewster L, Tarrant C. Health Expect. 2019;22:650-656.
Interviews with frontline hospital staff and executive leaders revealed that they were generally supportive of engaging families and patients to promote infection prevention in the clinical setting when using a collaborative approach. Staff identified certain challenges including concerns related to the extent of responsibility patients and families should bear with regard to infection prevention as well as risks to infection control posed by patients themselves.
Canadian Patient Safety Institute; CPSI; Health Standards Organization; HSO.
This draft 5-year framework aims to guide the activities in Canada to focus action, resources, and policy development on supporting care improvement. The document is structured around five goals: people-centered care, safe care, accessible care, appropriate care, and continuous care. The authors invited Canadian patients, families, clinicians, organization leaders, and policymakers to provide input on the material to ensure its applicability across the country. 
CDC Vital Signs. May 7, 2019.
Maternal morbidity and mortality is a worldwide patient safety problem. This analysis describes the prevalence of pregnancy-related death and areas of concern during pregnancy, at delivery, and up to a year postpartum. It reports that 60% of these deaths are preventable and provides suggestions for families, clinicians, and systems to reduce risks.
Dembosky A. All Things Considered and KQED. January 23, 2019.
Policy, practice, and communication strategies have been implemented in an effort to stem the opioid crisis and prescribing activities that contribute to misuse. This news article and accompanying webcast discuss an initiative in California that sends letters to prescribers whose patients have died due to opioid overdose. The piece outlines unintended consequences associated with the practice, including clinician reluctance to prescribe opioids for pain. An Annual Perspective discussed the patient safety aspects of the opioid epidemic.
Khan A, Spector ND, Baird JD, et al. BMJ. 2018;363:k4764.
Patient engagement in safety takes many forms: patients may report unique safety incidents, encourage adherence to best medical practice, and coproduce improvement initiatives. Family-centered rounding in pediatrics invites families to express concerns, clarify information, and provide real-time input to the health care team. This pre–post study explored the safety impact of family-centered rounds on 3106 admissions in pediatric units at 7 hospitals. Family-centered rounds reduced both preventable and nonpreventable adverse events. They also improved family experience without substantially lengthening rounding time. A past PSNet interview discussed the safety benefits of structured communication between health care providers and family members.
Gosport Independent Panel. London, England: Crown Copyright; 2018. ISBN: 9781528604062.
Organizational culture influences how comfortable individuals are with raising awareness of conditions that diminish patient safety. This independent inquiry report provides case studies and a detailed analysis of conditions that hindered nurses and families from acquiring answers about care concerns. The analysis determined factors such as hierarchy and poor physician regard for nursing expertise as persistent challenges to safety in health care.
Medical care overuse is emerging as a patient safety hazard that can result in harms such as unneeded testing and poor end-of-life care. This collection of articles and audiovisual resources explore factors that contribute to medical care overuse and its impact on patients and their families.
Jalal H, Buchanich JM, Roberts MS, et al. Science (1979). 2018;361.
Opioid overdose deaths remain a threat to patient safety. Information about how overdose deaths are nationally distributed is critical to inform prevention efforts. This robust analysis examined all drug overdose deaths in the United States over a 38-year period. Drug overdoses began increasing exponentially long before the opioid prescribing boom in the mid-1990s and continue to rise in this way. Demographically distinct subepidemics of prescription opioid, synthetic opioid, and stimulant use all contribute to drug overdose deaths as a whole. The authors speculate about what factors other than opioid prescribing might drive escalating substance use-related deaths. An Annual Perspective and a PSNet perspective provide further insights into how safety efforts can reduce opioid-related harm.
Kirby J; Cannon C; Darrah L; Milliman-Richard Y.
Parents are important advocates for the safe care of their children. This commentary describes how one hospital built a toolkit to operationalize family members as partners to improve safety. The organization applied high reliability concepts to identify, recognize, and support projects at the hospital to successfully use patients' perspectives to design improvements.