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MedWatch Safety Alert. Silver Spring, MD: US Food and Drug Administration; October 12, 2021.

This announcement highlights the possibility of medication administration inaccuracy due to design characteristics of a low dose tip (LDT) syringe. Recommended cleaning methods and other actions for patients, families and clinicians are provided to protect dose precision when using these syringes.
Carvalho IV, Sousa VM de, Visacri MB, et al. Pediatr Emerg Care. 2021;37(4):e152-e158.
This study sought to determine the rate of pediatric emergency department (ED) visits due to adverse drug events (ADE). Of 1,708 pediatric patients, 12.3% were admitted to the ED due to ADEs, with the highest rates of admission due to neurological, dermatological, and respiratory medications. The authors recommend the involvement of clinical pharmacists to prevent and identify ADEs in the pediatric population, particularly through education of children’s caregivers and health professionals.
Canadian Patient Safety Institute;
Patient stories and insights related to medical mishaps can inspire and motivate work to enhance health care safety. This annual podcast series uses patient accounts of medical errors to collaboratively explore solutions with health care providers.
Young E. The Atlantic. 2020.
Preconceptions of disease can impact the medical and social response to patients with chronic conditions. This article discusses patients with COVID-19 who survive the virus and describes ineffective support due to lack of understanding and empathy regarding the long-term debilitation survivors experience.    
Hado E, Friss Feinberg L. J Aging Soc Policy. 2020;32(4-5):410-415.
These authors discuss the role of family caregivers during the COVID-19 pandemic and suggest avenues to support the relationship between families and residents of long-term care facilities, including strengthening communicating channels, activating family councils, and utilizing gerontological social work students.
Agarwal M, Lovegrove MC, Geller RJ, et al. J Pediatr. 2020;219.
Parents are advised to keep medications inaccessible to young children to avoid accidental ingestions. This study prospectively enrolled nearly 4,500 individuals calling poison control centers about unsupervised solid dose medication exposure in young children (ages 5 years and younger) to identify the types of containers from which young children accessed these medications. The majority of incidents (71.6%) involved children 2 years and younger. Incidents were equally divided among calls involving prescription-only medications, over-the-counter (OTC) projects requiring child-resistant packaging, and OTC projects not requiring such packaging. One-third of all incidents involved medication that had been removed from the original container; this was more likely in incidents involving prescription drugs compared to OTC drugs (adjusted odds ratio, 3.39; 95% CI, 2.87-4.00).  These findings suggest that unsupervised medication exposures in young children are just as often the result of adults removing medications from original packaging as the result of improper use or failure of child-resistant packaging.

FDA alerts patients and health care professionals of EpiPen auto-injector errors related to device malfunctions and user administration. MedWatch Safety Alert. Silver Spring, MD: US Food and Drug Administration. March 24, 2020.

Device related errors reduce the safety of medications. This announcement highlights concerns associated with the use of epinephrine auto-injectors. Recommendations to address the problem include patient review of instructions and practice with the device to ensure its effective use in emergent situations.
Massachusetts Sepsis Consortium.
Delayed diagnosis of sepsis is a primary patient safety concern. This campaign raises awareness of the symptoms of sepsis to engage patients in timely diagnosis and safe treatment of the condition. 
Schrade B, Teegardin C. Unprotected: Broken promises in Georgia’s senior care industry. Atlanta Journal-Constitution. Sept-October 2019.
Assisted living facilities have challenges that reduce the quality and safety of care. This news investigation examines how poor management, staffing shortages, and poor caregiver training were unchecked by systemic failures in correcting problems to protect residents. 
Dinnen T, Williams H, Yardley S, et al. BMJ Support Palliat Care. 2019.
Advance care planning (ACP) allows patients to express and document their preferences about medical treatment; however, there are concerns about uptake and documentation due to human error. This study used patient safety incident reports in the UK to characterize and explore safety issues arising from ACP and to identify areas for improvement. Over a ten-year period, there were 70 reports of an ACP-related patient safety incident (due to incomplete documentation, inaccessible documentation or miscommunication, or ACP directives not being followed) which led to inappropriate treatment, transfer or admission. The importance of targeting the human factors of the ACP process to improve safety is discussed. A PSNet Human Factors Primer on human factors expands on these concepts.  
Demiris G, Lin S-Y, Turner AM. Stud Health Technol Inform . 2019;264:1159-1163.
Patient safety in the home has not been well defined and there have been few studies of this setting. This study examines the concept of patient safety in the home and identifies personal health information management tools to support and maximize patient safety in the home. The study findings demonstrate the physical, emotional, social and functional dimensions of patient safety in the home and ways for informatics tools to maximize safety aspects.
Harrisburg, PA: Patient Safety Authority. ISSN 2641-4716.
The Pennsylvania Patient Safety Authority is a long-established source of patient safety data analysis and application-focused commentary. Their publishing output aims to generate improvements in their state as well as throughout health care. This open-access publication replaces the quarterly Pennsylvania Patient Safety Advisory newsletter.
Efforts to engage patients in safety efforts have focused on three areas: enlisting patients in detecting adverse events, empowering patients to ensure safe care, and emphasizing patient involvement as a means of improving the culture of safety.
King L, Peacock G, Crotty M, et al. Health Expect. 2019;22:385-395.
Patients and families have the potential to help medical teams proactively detect clinical deteriorations. This qualitative study with consumer advocates resulted in a comprehensive model for empowering patients to accurately activate rapid response systems.
Palmer J. Patient Saf Qual Healthc. May/June 2019.
Organizations must learn from adverse events to prevent similar incidents. Reporting on lessons to be learned from the cascade of failures connected with the preventable death of a patient during an acute asthma attack at the door of a hospital emergency department, this magazine article outlines the importance of effective signage, appropriate security staff placement, and acceptance of the responsibility for failure.
Austin M; Derk J; Armstrong Institute for Patient Safety and Quality; Johns Hopkins Medicine.
Measures help track gaps in process and evidence of safety improvements. This white paper examines the performance of hospitals receiving Hospital Safety Grades and the relationship between high-level recognition and preventable harm. The report estimates that a substantial number of lives could have been saved if performance metrics had been met, but concludes that even high-performing hospitals exhibit areas in need of improvement.