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The PSNet Collection: All Content

The AHRQ PSNet Collection comprises an extensive selection of resources relevant to the patient safety community. These resources come in a variety of formats, including literature, research, tools, and Web sites. Resources are identified using the National Library of Medicine’s Medline database, various news and content aggregators, and the expertise of the AHRQ PSNet editorial and technical teams.

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October 10, 2022
Selected PSNet materials for a general safety audience focusing on improvements in the diagnostic process and the strategies that support them to prevent diagnostic errors from harming patients.
Law AC, Roche S, Reichheld A, et al. Jt Comm J Qual Patient Saf. 2019;45:276-284.
Emotional and psychological harm are understudied but common preventable adverse events. Overt disrespect from health care providers and the lasting psychological impact of safety hazards both contribute to emotional harm. This large, prospective study explored emotional harm among 1559 family members of intensive care unit patients at a hospital in Boston, Massachusetts. About 22% of family members reported inadequate respect toward either themselves or the patient, and more than half of respondents perceived a lack of control over their loved one's care. Inadequate respect and lack of control were strongly correlated with overall satisfaction with care. A WebM&M commentary discussed the utility of family-centered care to preventing harm in the intensive care unit.
Fargen KM, Drolet BC, Philibert I. Acad Med. 2016;91:858-64.
Disruptive and unprofessional behavior results in a poor culture of safety and may contribute to adverse events. This literature review sought to examine the incidence and types of unprofessional behaviors among medical students and residents. Although many studies show that trainees commit professionalism violations fairly regularly—for example, multiple studies show that up to 50% of residents falsify their duty hours—there was no clear evidence of an increase over time. The authors acknowledge that study of this area is impaired by lack of a standard definition and measurement strategy for unprofessional behavior and by a poor understanding of the relationship between professionalism violations and patient safety.