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The PSNet Collection: All Content

The AHRQ PSNet Collection comprises an extensive selection of resources relevant to the patient safety community. These resources come in a variety of formats, including literature, research, tools, and Web sites. Resources are identified using the National Library of Medicine’s Medline database, various news and content aggregators, and the expertise of the AHRQ PSNet editorial and technical teams.

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Curated Libraries
September 13, 2021
Ensuring maternal safety is a patient safety priority. This library reflects a curated selection of PSNet content focused on improving maternal safety. Included resources explore strategies with the potential to improve maternal care delivery and outcomes, such as high reliability, care standardization,teamwork, unit-based safety initiatives, and...
Ogunyemi D, Hage N, Kim SK, et al. Jt Comm J Qual Patient Saf. 2019;45:423-430.
The rise in maternal morbidity and mortality is one of the most pressing patient safety issues in the United States. Formal debriefing after adverse events is an important method for analyzing and improving safety. In this study, an academic hospital adopted a systems-based morbidity and mortality conference model to review cases of serious maternal harm and implemented several safety measures (including teamwork training) to address issues that were identified through structured review.
Slomski A. JAMA. 2019;321:1239-1241.
Maternal mortality is a sentinel event that affects mothers and families across a wide range of socioeconomic characteristics. This commentary explores how data collection gaps, medical errors, ineffective treatments, and care coordination weaknesses contribute to preventable maternal death. The author highlights efforts to improve safety in maternity care such as best practice bundles to ensure teams and clinicians are prepared for certain complications.
Sangarlangkarn A.
Rigid adherence to protocols may detract from safety when unexpected critical events occur that require deviation from the standard process. This commentary explores insights from a physician, both as a clinician and as a new mother, when health care staff failed to effectively consider patient concerns and knowledge in understanding and treating the cause of postlabor pain. The patient identified the cause and requested appropriate treatment, but nurses consulted protocols for pain after labor and only offered pain medications, which might have exacerbated the problem. The author calls for clinician autonomy to recognize when standardization is not appropriate and how to address individual patient needs.
Kozhimannil KB. Health Aff (Millwood). 2018;37:1901-1904.
Maternal harm is a sentinel event that is gaining increased attention in both policy and clinical environments. In this commentary, the author relates her family history of maternal morbidity and mortality and advocates for enhancements in collecting data on maternal health outcomes, access to care, understanding of racial disparities, accountability, and listening to patients and families who have been impacted by unsafe maternal care.
Neily J, Soncrant C, Mills PD, et al. JAMA Netw Open. 2018;1:e185147.
The Joint Commission and National Quality Forum both consider wrong-site, wrong-procedure, and wrong-patient surgeries to be never events. Despite improvement approaches ranging from the Universal Protocol to nonpayment for the procedures themselves and any consequent care, these serious surgical errors continue to occur. This study measured the incidence of incorrect surgeries in Veterans Health Administration medical centers from 2010 to 2017. Surgical patient safety events resulting in harm were rare and declined by more than two-thirds from 2000 to 2017. Dentistry, ophthalmology, and neurosurgery had the highest incidence of in–operating room adverse events. Root cause analysis revealed that 29% of events could have been prevented with a correctly performed time-out. A WebM&M commentary examined an incident involving a wrong-side surgery.
Snijders C, van Lingen RA, Klip H, et al. Arch Dis Child Fetal Neonatal Ed. 2009;94:F210-5.
Incident reporting systems are one mechanism for hospitals to both identify and potentially prevent adverse events, although they have frequently failed to meet those expectations. This study describes findings from a voluntary system that produced a significant increase in reported neonatal events, many of which were associated with patient morbidity.