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Dietz AS, Salas E, Pronovost PJ, et al. Crit Care Med. 2018;46:1898-1905.
This study aimed to validate a behavioral marker as a measure of teamwork, specifically in the intensive care unit setting. Researchers found that it was difficult to establish interrater reliability for teamwork when observing behaviors and conclude that assessment of teamwork remains complex in the context of patient safety research.
MacDougall-Davis SR, Kettley L, Cook TM. Anaesthesia. 2016;71:764-72.
SBAR has been widely implemented to improve communication in health care settings. This simulation study compared the use of SBAR with a newly developed Traffic Lights tool to assess the communication between anesthesia teams in different operating rooms in 12 validated clinical scenarios. The authors found that the new tool yielded more accurate information transfer, took less time to use, and was preferred by the majority of study participants.
Sheth S, McCarthy E, Kipps AK, et al. PEDIATRICS. 2016;137.
The I-PASS signout tool has become a widely used method of patient handoffs when transferring care from the primary clinician to a covering clinician. This study used the I-PASS framework to develop and implement a standardized signout process for transferring patients from the pediatric cardiac intensive care unit to the general ward. The new process significantly improved clinician workflow and perceived safety culture relating to handoffs.
Tscholl DW, Weiss M, Kolbe M, et al. Anesth Analg. 2015;121:948-956.
This pre-post study demonstrated increases in teamwork after introduction of an anesthesia checklist. Although evidence for checklists in real-world settings is mixed, this work demonstrates their efficacy as part of an intervention study, which is consistent with prior work.
Dietz AS, Pronovost PJ, Mendez-Tellez PA, et al. J Crit Care. 2014;29:908-14.
Improving teamwork and communication is a continued focus in the hospital setting. This systematic review revealed that although studies of teamwork in the intensive care unit abound, the field lacks common definitions and constructs. Teamwork usually entailed joint strategy and shared goals, and quality improvement approaches to enhance teamwork typically involve team training and development of structured protocols. Many interventions target rounds, during which interdisciplinary providers discuss each patient, or handoffs between clinicians. The authors suggest that communication is the most prominent aspect of teamwork and propose further study in conceptualizing teamwork to design effective interventions. The heterogeneity in defining and measuring teamwork may account for mixed results in improving safety outcomes. An AHRQ WebM&M perspective describes the Veterans Health Administration's medical team training program.
Bonifacio AS, Segall N, Barbeito A, et al. Int Anesthesiol Clin. 2013;51:43-61.
This commentary discusses concerns associated with patient transfers from the operating room to the intensive care unit and describes strategies to improve such handoffs, including standardizing processes and offering training to enhance teamwork and communication.
Sarcevic A, Marsic I, Burd RS. ACM Transactions on Computer-Human Interaction. 2012;19.
This study examines the nature of trauma teamwork errors and suggests structures to better support team cognition and decision-making.
BMJ Qual Saf. 2011;22.
Silence and poor communication are known threats to patient safety. Despite efforts to promote teamwork and develop shared tools for communication, there are persistent gaps between nurse and physician practices. This study surveyed nurses and physicians working in labor and delivery units and discovered significant differences in their perceptions of patient harm associated with various clinical scenarios. These differences in patient harm ratings were the greatest predictor of speaking up, suggesting that differences in clinical assessment may serve as a useful target for intervention. The authors discuss the negative impact of environments where mental models are not shared, conflict is poorly managed, and disruptive behaviors stifle open communication. A past AHRQ WebM&M commentary discussed a case of "silence" when members of the operating room team were reluctant to speak up to a senior surgeon.
Sehgal NL, Green A, Vidyarthi AR, et al. J Hosp Med. 2010;5:234-9.
This study discovered that while nurses and physicians use patient whiteboards differently, they all value its potential for improving teamwork, communication, and patient care. The authors provide a series of recommendations for those adopting whiteboards and advocate for their use as a patient-centered tool.
Jukkala AM, Kirby RS. MCN Am J Matern Child Nurs. 2009;34:365-371.
This survey of rural hospitals in the southern United States found that hospitals with fewer than 125 deliveries per year were relatively less prepared to administer neonatal resuscitation. As well, one-third of hospitals did not have an established method for transferring patients to tertiary care hospitals.
Smits M, Groenewegen PP, Timmermans DRM, et al. BMC Emerg Med. 2009;9:16.
Emergency department (ED) patients are particularly vulnerable to adverse events, and a prior study of closed malpractice claims implicated systems factors such as poor teamwork in adverse patient outcomes. This study used root cause analysis of incident reports to identify the types and causes of errors and unanticipated events in the ED. Incidents included poor communication and teamwork, particularly with other departments, but medication errors and diagnostic errors were also noted. The authors recommend that organizations integrate the ED into hospital-wide safety improvement efforts.
Mazzocco K, Petitti DB, Fong KT, et al. Am J Surg. 2009;197:678-85.
Direct observation of teamwork during surgical procedures revealed that poor teamwork was associated with higher rates of postoperative complications and overall mortality, even after adjusting for preoperative risk. Though suboptimal teamwork is a recognized problem in the operating room, this study is one of the first to directly link team behavior to patient outcomes. One method of improving teamwork, crew resource management training, has been extensively evaluated in a variety of clinical settings. A near miss resulting from poor teamwork is illustrated in a recent AHRQ WebM&M commentary.
Lingard LA. Archives of Surgery. 2008;143.
Structured communication tools are being used increasingly to prevent critical communication failures. This study evaluated the impact of an interprofessional preoperative checklist briefing and discovered a significant three-fold reduction in communication breakdowns. While past studies have similarly demonstrated benefits from improved communication in the operating room, this is the first to directly observe how briefings affect team communication. An invited critique, led by Drs. Pronovost and Makary, accompanies the study and applauds the authors' efforts to rigorously evaluate a communication tool.