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Patrician PA, Bakerjian D, Billings R, et al. Nurs Outlook. 2022;Epub Jul 4.
Clinician well-being has important implications for patient safety and quality of healthcare delivery. In this study, researchers used a concept analysis to identify attributes of nurse well-being at the individual level (e.g., satisfaction, compassion) and organizational/community level (e.g., teamwork, pride in work). These findings can support the development of a standardized definition of nurse well-being to guide future research and policy considerations around well-being and burnout.
Montgomery A, Lainidi O, Johnson J, et al. Health Care Manage Rev. 2022;Epub Jun 16.
When faced with a patient safety concern, staff need to decide whether to speak up or remain silent. Leaders play a crucial role in addressing contextual factors behind employees’ decisions to remain silent. This article offers support for leaders to create a culture of psychological safety and encourage speaking up behaviors.
Al-Ghunaim TA, Johnson J, Biyani CS, et al. Am J Surg. 2022;224:228-238.
Burnout in healthcare providers has been linked to lower patient safety and increased adverse events. This systematic review examined studies focusing on the relationship between burnout and patient safety and professionalism in surgeons. Results indicate higher rates of burnout and emotional exhaustion were associated with an increased risk of involvement in medical error. Interventions to reduce burnout and improve surgeon well-being may result in improved patient safety.
Cribb A, O'Hara JK, Waring J. BMJ Qual Saf. 2022;31:327-330.
Patient safety advocates recommend a shift from a blame culture to a just culture. This commentary describes three types of justice that exist in healthcare - retributive, no blame or qualified blame, and restorative. The authors invite debate around the concept of just culture and its role in the “real world”.
Rivera-Chiauzzi EY, Smith HA, Moore-Murray T, et al. J Patient Saf. 2022;18:e308-e314.
Peer support programs are increasingly used to support clinicians involved in adverse events. This evaluation found that a structured peer support program for providers involved in obstetric adverse events can effectively support providers in short periods of time (for example, 92% of participants did not need follow-up after second peer support contact) and can be initiated with limited resources.
Saliba R, Karam-Sarkis D, Zahar J-R, et al. J Hosp Infect. 2022;119:54-63.
Patient isolation for infection prevention and control may result in unintended consequences. This systematic review examined adverse physical and psychosocial events associated with patient isolation. A meta-analysis of seven observational studies showed no adverse events related to clinical care or patient experience with isolation.
Fischer T, Tian AW, Lee A, et al. The Leadership Q. 2021;32:101540.
While leaders and supervisors are responsible for ensuring a professional and respectful work environment, some may display disruptive and unprofessional behavior themselves. This systematic and critical review of abusive supervision research identified four major challenges facing the field, explaining how each challenge has limited past research, and offers recommendations for future research.
Rosen IEW, Shiekh RM, Mchome B, et al. Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand. 2021;100:704-714.
Improving maternal safety is an ongoing patient safety priority. This systematic review concluded that maternal near miss events are negatively associated with various aspects of quality of life. Women exposed to maternal near miss events were more likely to have overall lower quality of life, poorer mental and social health, and suffer negative economic consequences.
Azyabi A. Int J Environ Res Public Health. 2021;18:2466.
Accurate measurement of patient safety culture (PSC) is essential to improving patient safety. This review summarizes the results of 66 studies on PSC in hospitals. Multiple instruments were used to assess PSC, including the Hospital Survey on Patient Safety Culture (HSPSC) and the Safety Attitudes Questionnaire (SAQ). Teamwork and organization and behavioral learning were identified as critical factors impacting PSC and should be considered in future research.
Park Y, Hu J, Singh M, et al. JAMA Netw Open. 2021;4:e213909.
Machine learning uses data and statistical methods to enhance risk prediction models and it has been promoted as a tool to improve healthcare safety. Using Medicaid claims data for a large cohort of White and Black pregnant females, this study evaluated approaches to reduce bias in clinical prediction algorithms for postpartum depression and mental health service utilization. The researchers found that a reweighing method in machine learning models was associated with a greater reduction in bias than excluding race from the prediction models. The authors suggest further examination of potentially biased data informing clinical prediction models and consideration of other methods to mitigate bias.
Avesar M, Erez A, Essakow J, et al. Diagnosis (Berl). 2021;8:358-367.
Disruptive and rude behavior can hinder teamwork and diminish patient safety. This randomized, simulation-based study including attendings, fellows, and residents explored whether rudeness during handoff affects the likelihood for challenging a diagnostic error. The authors found that rudeness may disproportionally hinder diagnostic performance among less experienced physicians.
Traylor AM. Am Psychol. 2021;76:1-13.
The COVID-19 pandemic has dramatically affected the psychological and emotional well-being of health care workers. This article summarizes the COVID-19-related psychological effects on healthcare workers and the detrimental impact on team effectiveness. The authors recommended actions to mitigate the effects of stress on team performance and patient outcomes and discuss how teams can recover and learn from the current crisis to prepare for future challenges.
Mekonnen B, Wang G, Rajbhandari-Thapa J, et al. J Stroke Cerebrovasc Dis. 2020;29:105106.
The ”weekend effect” refers to worse patient outcomes occurring outside of usual business hours. The authors used national data to examine in-hospital mortality differences among patients experiencing stroke admitted on the weekend versus on a weekday. After adjusting for patient and hospital characteristics, in-hospital mortality among hemorrhagic stroke patients was significantly greater among weekend compared to weekday admissions. No weekend effect was found among ischemic stroke patients. Future research should explore the influence of additional factors, such as patient-level behavioral risk factors and the availability of care providers and stroke care centers, particularly in rural regions.  
Brommelsiek M, Said T, Gray M, et al. Am J Surg. 2021;221:980-986.
Silence in the operating room (OR) can have implications on surgical team function and patient safety. Through interviews with interprofessional surgical team members, the authors explored the influence of silence on team action in the OR and found that silence in the surgical environment – whether due to team cohesion or individual defiance – has implications for team functions.
O’Donovan R, McAuliffe E. BMC Health Serv Res. 2020;20:810.
Organizational cultures that encourage psychological safety have been shown to increase safe healthcare. The authors used survey, observational, and interview data to explore psychological safety within four healthcare teams in one hospital. While survey results indicated a high level of psychological safety, observations and interviews identified examples of situations resulting in lower levels of psychological safety, such as absence of learning behavior, low levels of support from other team members, and lack of familiarity among team members.
Oliveira J. e Silva L, Vidor MV, Zarpellon de Araújo V, et al. Mayo Clin Proc. 2020;95:1842-1844.
This article discusses the threat that the “flexibilization” of science has played during the COVID-19 pandemic, defined as the loosening of methodological standards leading to low-quality studies, and resulting in unreliable data and anecdotal evidence.
Bae S-H, Dang D, Karlowicz KA, et al. J Patient Saf. 2020;16:e148-e155.
Based on survey data, this study explored intrapersonal, interpersonal and organizational triggers resulting in disruptive and unprofessional behavior. All three types of triggers were significantly related to disruptive behavior among nurses; intrapersonal and interpersonal triggers were significantly related to disruptive behavior among clinicians. The most frequent triggers included pressures from high census; environmental overload; chronic, unresolved system issues; and personal characteristics or issues impeding job performance.
Bender WR, Srinivas S, Coutifaris P, et al. Am J Perinatol. 2020;37:1271-1279.
This cohort explored the mental health impacts of a universal COVID-19 testing program on asymptomatic pregnant women and labor and delivery health care workers. Among multiparous women who tested negative, nearly 35% reported that COVID-19 led to additional fear or anxiety postpartum compared with previous deliveries. Labor and delivery health care workers reported that COVID-19 decreased job satisfaction and increased job-related anxiety.
Cho H, Pavek K, Steege LM. J Nurs Manag. 2020;28:1250-1258.
This article reports results of a national survey of early-career hospital nurses exploring the relationship between verbal abuse experience (perpetrated by patients, family, physicians, and other staff) and nurse-reported patient care quality and safety outcomes. Verbal abuse experience differed by nurse gender and age. Nurses who experienced verbal abuse were less likely to report high-quality care and favorable safety grade and were less likely to report safety problems. Organizations should provide education to recognize and respond to nurses’ verbal abuse experiences.
Fasano HT, McCarter MSJ, Simonis JM, et al. Simul Healthc. 2021;6:85-91.
This study explored disparities in physician decision making among patients of varying socioeconomic status (SES) during simulated scenarios. While quantitative analyses did not identify a significant relationship between SES and image or medication ordering, patient-perceived empathy, or clinical performance, qualitative analyses identified three themes which may bias decision making – overt diagnostic focus, discharge planning, and risk and exposure.