Skip to main content

All Content

Search Tips
Save
Selection
Format
Download
Published Date
Original Publication Date
Original Publication Date
PSNet Publication Date
Narrow Results By
1 - 5 of 5

Manojlovich M, Krein SL, Kronick SL, et al. Rockville, MD: Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality; August 2022. AHRQ Publication No. 22-0026-2-EF.

Nurses are increasingly discussed as diagnostic team members. The knowledge of the team as a unit, or distributed cognition, is considered as an asset to diagnosis that rests on relationships between nurses, physicians, and patients. This issue brief is part of a series on diagnostic safety.

Bajaj K, de Roche A, Goffman D. Rockville, MD: Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality; September 2021. AHRQ Publication No. 20(21)-0040-6-EF.

Maternal safety is threatened by systemic biases, care complexities, and diagnostic issues. This issue brief explores the role of diagnostic error in maternal morbidity and mortality, the preventability of common problems such as maternal hemorrhage, and the importance of multidisciplinary efforts to realize improvement. The brief focuses on events occurring during childbirth and up to a week postpartum.

Mangus CW, Singh H, Mahajan P. Rockville, MD: Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality; February 2021. AHRQ Publication No. 20(21)-0040-4-EF.

Health information technology (Health IT) presents opportunities to engage patients and families in decision making. This issue brief highlights health IT tools that can close this communication gap to engage patients in diagnosis in the emergency room. This brief is part of a publication series examining diagnostic improvement across health care.
Cortese D, Abbott P, Chassin M, Lyon GM III, Riley WJ. Dallas, TX: Texas Health Resources Leadership; 2015.
Delayed diagnosis of infectious disease can negatively affect patients, care teams, and public health. Challenges surrounding diagnosis of the first Ebola case in the United States highlighted deficits in disaster preparedness. Reviewing insights from a panel analysis of this well-known and highly publicized case of Ebola, this report underscores the need to improve information transfer and emergency department safety culture to enhance diagnostic and infection prevention processes. A previous WebM&M commentary discussed the utility of simulation training to ensure provider competency when caring for patients potentially infected with Ebola.