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ECRI and Institute for Safe Medication Practices. January 2022 through May 2022.

Collaboratives provide teams with active learning and improvement opportunities based on the experiences of others working toward a collective goal. This collaborative will target safety during surgical procedures. The discussions protected under the sponsors’ Patient Safety Organization status will explore improvement topics such as medication errors and surgical site infections.

National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. June 7-8, 2021.

Maternal safety is challenged by clinical, equity, and social influences. This virtual event examined maternal health conditions in the United States to improve health system practice and performance for this population. Discussions addressed the need for better data collection, evidence-based practice, and social determinants knowledge integration to enhance the safety of care.

Weiser S. The New Yorker and Retro Report; 2021.

Disparities in maternal care have become apparent as a public health concern during the COVID-19 pandemic. This short film spotlights inequities and biases that Black mothers face, that reduce the safety of their care. Midwives are offered as a strategy for improving the safety of maternal care in this patient population.
Fillo KT. Bureau of Health Care Safety and Quality, Department of Public Health. Boston, MA: Commonwealth of Massachusetts; 2020.
This annual report compiles patient safety data documented by Massachusetts hospitals. The latest numbers represent a modest increase in serious reportable events recorded in acute care hospitals, from 1066 the previous year to 1189. This presentation also includes events from ambulatory surgery centers. Previous years reports are also available.

Dembosky A. All Things Considered. National Public Radio. October 15, 2020.

Physician implicit bias is gaining attention as a patient safety concern. This piece shares a story of ineffective care delivery to a patient with COVID-19 as context for the discussion. Hospital tactics to address the problem such as training and use of patient survey data to motivate individual action are reviewed.   

Institute for Safe Medication Practices and US Food and Drug Administration Division of Drug Information. June 23, 2020.

The COVID-19 pandemic response is creating a need for care delivery adjustments that include changes in pharmacy and medication practices. This webinar discussed process alterations that have the potential to impact safe medication administration and provide context for the changes to help ensure they are effectively implemented.

Booker C, Kargbo C. PBS News Hour. April 26, 2020.

The demands on health care organizations due to the influx of patients with COVID-19 are impacting a wide range of services and supplies. This news segment discusses schedule changes in transplants and other surgeries and the risks to patients as a result of those delays.

Mosley T. COVID-19 leads to increased need for dialysis machines. Here & Now. Boston Public Radio. April 27, 2020.

Comorbidities can result in unexpected care complexities. This article discusses an emerging challenge for treating patients with COVID-19 who also experience kidney failure and a lack of dialysis machines and the professionals to run them.
Oakbrook Terrace, IL: Joint Commission: October 2019.
Inpatient suicide is increasing as a safety concern. This case analysis offers two levels of examination of a hypothetical patient suicide: one that outlines points of failure in the patient’s care and the other that shares strategies to prevent the event from occurring. 
CDC Vital Signs. May 7, 2019.
Maternal morbidity and mortality is a worldwide patient safety problem. This analysis describes the prevalence of pregnancy-related death and areas of concern during pregnancy, at delivery, and up to a year postpartum. It reports that 60% of these deaths are preventable and provides suggestions for families, clinicians, and systems to reduce risks.

Livingston E, Howell EA. JAMA Clinical Reviews. April 2, 2019.

Maternal mortality in the United States is gaining increased attention as a patient safety concern. This podcast discusses conditions known to challenge maternal safety, the high incidence of preventable harm in this population, and care bundles as an improvement strategy. A recent Annual Perspective summarized national initiatives to improve safety in maternity care.
Montagne R. Weekend Edition Sunday. National Public Radio. March 11, 2018.
Maternal death is a sentinel event. This news audio segment reports on childbirth-related death in the United States and firsthand accounts of complications associated with childbirth, such as infection. The interview also discusses how misdiagnosis contributes to the severity of problems. This piece is part of an ongoing series on the safety of maternal care.
Lantz F; WBUR.
Partnerships between physicians and patients can yield important outcomes that support safety improvements. This radio segment reports insights from both the patient and clinician involved in an adverse event and how this incident launched an organization that focuses on support for patients and clinicians that have been affected by medical errors.
Cima RR, Dankbar E, Lovely J, et al. Journal of the American College of Surgeons. 2012;216.
Some of the most prominent successes in the patient safety field have been achieved in preventing health care–associated infections. Sponsored by The Joint Commission Center for Transforming Healthcare and the American College of Surgeons, this effort used rigorous quality improvement methodology and a collaborative approach across seven participating hospitals to tackle the problem of surgical site infections (SSIs) in patients undergoing colorectal surgery. The project was a remarkable success, achieving a 32% reduction in SSIs during the study period. The Center for Transforming Healthcare is also sponsoring efforts to prevent wrong-site surgery and improve hand hygiene and handoff communications.
Schneider EB, Hirani SA, Hambridge HL, et al. J Surg Res. 2012;177:295-300.
Being admitted to the hospital on a weekend is potentially dangerous, as studies have shown that preventable complications and mortality are increased across a range of common diagnoses for weekend admissions compared with weekdays. One exception appears to be trauma, as a prior study found equal outcomes in patients with traumatic injuries regardless of the day of admission, a finding ascribed to the protocolized and closely supervised nature of trauma care. However, this study of older adults admitted with traumatic brain injury did find increased mortality for those patients admitted on the weekend, despite the fact that patients admitted on the weekend were less severely injured. A limitation of this study is that the authors were not able to analyze outcomes for patients cared for at specialized trauma centers. Nevertheless, the study adds to the considerable body of research documenting the dangers of weekend hospital admission.