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Gogalniceanu P, Kunduzi B, Ruckley C, et al. Surgery. 2022;172:537-545.
The patient safety field frequently adapts safety methods from aviation, such as checklists and crew resource management. Drawn from fieldwork, interviews with aviation safety experts, and focus groups with patient safety experts, this study adapted interventions from aviation crisis recovery for use in surgical error recovery. Twelve tools were developed based on three broad strategies: situational awareness and workload management; checklists for non-normal situations; decision making and problem solving.
Armstrong BA, Dutescu IA, Nemoy L, et al. BMJ Qual Saf. 2022;31:463-478.
Despite widespread use of surgical safety checklists (SSC), its success in improving patient outcomes remains inconsistent, potentially due to variations in implementation and completion methods. This systematic review sought to identify how many studies describe the ways in which the SSC was implemented and completed, and the impact on provider outcomes, patient outcomes, and moderating factors. A clearer positive relationship was seen for provider outcomes (e.g., communication) than for patient outcomes (e.g., mortality).
Emond YEJJM, Calsbeek H, Peters YAS, et al. Br J Anaesth. 2022;128:562-573.
A necessary part of successful implementation of new guidelines is ensuring continued adherence. Nine Dutch hospitals implemented a multifaceted program (IMPlementatie Richtlijnen Operatieve VEiligheid [IMPROVE]) to support application of surgical guidelines. Results of guideline use were mixed.
Urban D, Burian BK, Patel K, et al. Ann Surg. 2021;2:e075.
The WHO surgical safety checklist has been implemented in healthcare systems around the world. Survey responses from 2,032 surgical team members from high-income countries suggest that most respondents perceive the checklist as enhancing patient safety, but that not all team members are engaging with its use or feel confident in their role in the checklist process.
Ellis R, Hardie JA, Summerton DJ, et al. Surg. 2021;59:752-756.
Many non-urgent, non-cancer surgeries were postponed or canceled during COVID-19 surges resulting in a potential loss of surgeons’ “currency”. This commentary discusses the benefits of, and barriers to, dual surgeon operating as a way to increase currency as elective surgeries are resumed.
Omar I, Graham Y, Singhal R, et al. World J Surg. 2021;45:697-704.
Never events can result in serious patient harm and indicate serious underlying organizational safety problems. This study analyzed never events occurring between 2012 and 2020 in the National Health Services and categorized 51 common never events into four categories – wrong site surgery (40% of events); retained foreign objects post-procedure (28%); wrong implant/prosthesis (13%); and non-surgical/infrequent never events (19%). Awareness of these themes may support focused efforts to reduce their incidence and development of specific local safety standards. 
Omar I, Singhal R, Wilson M, et al. Int J Qual Health Care. 2021;33:mzab045.
Never events, a significant type of adverse event, should never occur in healthcare. This study analyzed 797 surgical never events that occurred from April 2012 to February 2020 in the National Health Service (NHS) England and categorized them into three main categories: wrong-site surgery (53.58%), retained items post-procedure (44.54%), and wrong implant/prosthesis (1.88%). In total 56 common general surgery never events have been found. Being aware of the common themes may help providers to develop more effective strategies to prevent these adverse events.
Filipescu D, Ştefan M. Best Pract Res Clin Anaesthesiol. 2021;35:141-153.
Transgender people are especially vulnerable in healthcare settings. Anesthesiologists are in a critical position to improve transgender patient outcomes by being aware of sex-related differences in physiology, pharmacokinetics, and pharmacodynamics. In addition to research characterizing outcomes of surgery between men and women, future research should address the role of women anesthesiologists in improving patient safety.
Fridrich A, Imhof A, Schwappach DLB. J Patient Saf. 2021;17:217-222.
Checklists are used across clinical areas. Following the publication of the World Health Organization’s (WHO) Surgical Safety Checklist in 2009, other organizations developed their own checklists or adapted the WHO Surgical Safety Checklist for local settings. The authors analyzed 24 checklists used in 18 Swiss hospitals, identified major differences between study checklists and reference checklists and provided recommendations for future research regarding the effectiveness of surgical safety checklists. 
Hibbert PD, Thomas MJW, Deakin A, et al. Int J Qual Health Care. 2020;32:184-189.
Based on 31 root cause analysis reports of surgical incidents in Australia, this study found that the most commonly retained surgical items were surgical packs (n=9) and drain tubes (n=8). While most retained items were detected on the day of the procedure (n=7), about 16% of items were detected 6-months or later post-procedure. The study found that complex or lengthy procedures were more likely to lead to a retained item, and many retained items, such as drains or catheters, occur in postoperative settings where surgical counts are not applicable.
Panesar SS, Carson-Stevens A, Salvilla SA, et al. Drug Healthc Patient Saf. 2013;5:57-65.
The largest proportion of surgical patient safety events reported to the National Reporting and Learning System came from trauma and orthopedic surgery patients. Many of the events involved failure to rescue.