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Avesar M, Erez A, Essakow J, et al. Diagnosis (Berl). 2021;8:358-367.
Disruptive and rude behavior can hinder teamwork and diminish patient safety. This randomized, simulation-based study including attendings, fellows, and residents explored whether rudeness during handoff affects the likelihood for challenging a diagnostic error. The authors found that rudeness may disproportionally hinder diagnostic performance among less experienced physicians.
Meyer AND, Upadhyay DK, Collins CA, et al. Jt Comm J Qual Patient Saf. 2021;47:120-126.
Efforts to reduce diagnostic error should include educational strategies for improving diagnosis. This article describes the development of a learning health system around diagnostic safety at one large, integrated health care system. The program identified missed opportunities in diagnosis based on clinician reports, patient complaints, and risk management, and used trained facilitators to provide feedback to clinicians about these missed opportunities as learning opportunities. Both facilitators and recipients found the program to be useful and believed it would improve future diagnostic safety. 
Stark N, Kerrissey M, Grade M, et al. West J Emerg Med. 2020;21:1095-1101.
This article describes the development and implementation of a digital tool to centralize and standardize COVID-19-related resources for use in the emergency department (ED). Clinician feedback suggests confirms that the tool has affected their management of COVID-19 patients. The tool was found to be easily adaptable to accommodate rapidly evolving guidance and enable organizational capacity for improvisation and resiliency.  
Platts-Mills TF, Nagurney JM, Melnick ER. Ann Emerg Med. 2020;75:715-720.
Clinicians commonly face uncertainty in complex care situations. The authors propose several strategies for physicians, physician groups, departments, and professional societies to integrate uncertainty into emergency medicine decision-making.
Stoklosa H, Scannell M, Ma Z, et al. Emerg Med J. 2018;35:406-411.
Emergency department crowding is linked to medication errors and other preventable harm. Crowding requires providers to evaluate patients quickly under suboptimal conditions, such as in hallways or waiting rooms with inadequate nursing support, which may lead to diagnostic errors. This cross-sectional survey of emergency medicine physicians assessed how evaluating patients in the hallway or with a companion present changed their usual diagnostic practices. Researchers found that 90% of physicians altered their history-taking or physical examination, and 40% reported a diagnostic error or delay as a result. The most common missed diagnoses were suicidal ideation, abuse or neglect, and genitourinary system disease. A PSNet Perspective and a WebM&M commentary discussed strategies to reduce diagnostic errors in emergency departments.
Sung S, Forman-Hoffman V, Wilson MC, et al. J Gen Intern Med. 2006;21:1075-8.
The investigators surveyed primary care physicians regarding direct notification of results for three specific diagnostic tests. They found that physicians generally favored direct reporting to patients when test results were normal, had less diagnostic severity, or had less potential for emotional impact.