Skip to main content

All Content

Search Tips
Save
Selection
Format
Download
Published Date
Original Publication Date
Original Publication Date
PSNet Publication Date
Narrow Results By
PSNet Original Content
Commonly Searched Resource Types
1 - 8 of 8
Kern-Goldberger AR, Kneifati-Hayek J, Fernandes Y, et al. Obstet Gynecol. 2021;138:229-235.
Patient misidentification errors can result in serious patient harm. The authors reviewed over 1.3 million electronic orders for inpatients at one New York hospital between 2016 and 2018 and found that wrong-patient order errors occurred more frequently on obstetric units than medical-surgical units. Medication errors were the largest source of order errors and commonly involved antibiotics and opioid and non-opioid analgesics.
Kannampallil TG, Manning JD, Chestek DW, et al. J Am Med Inform Assoc. 2018;25:739-743.
Opening multiple patients' charts in the electronic medical record simultaneously may increase the risk of wrong-patient orders, a known patient safety hazard. Researchers analyzed intercepted wrong-patient medication orders in an emergency department over a 6-year period and found no significant reduction when the maximum number of charts allowed to be open at the same time decreased from 4 to 2. Similarly, there was no significant increase when the maximum number of charts permitted to be open simultaneously increased from 2 to 4.
Green RA, Hripcsak G, Salmasian H, et al. Ann Emerg Med. 2015;65:679-686.e1.
While computerized physician order entry is expected to significantly reduce adverse drug events, systems must be implemented thoughtfully to avoid facilitating certain types of errors. A forcing function that mandated correct patient identification resulted in a moderate decrease in wrong-patient prescribing errors within a computerized provider order entry system.