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The PSNet Collection: All Content

The AHRQ PSNet Collection comprises an extensive selection of resources relevant to the patient safety community. These resources come in a variety of formats, including literature, research, tools, and Web sites. Resources are identified using the National Library of Medicine’s Medline database, various news and content aggregators, and the expertise of the AHRQ PSNet editorial and technical teams.

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Displaying 1 - 20 of 41 Results
Rockville, MD: Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality.
In this annual publication, AHRQ reviews the results of the National Healthcare Quality Report and National Healthcare Disparities Report. The 2022 report discusses a decrease in life expectancy due to the COVID-19 pandemic. It also reviews the current status of special areas of interest such as maternity care, child and adolescent mental health, and substance abuse disorders. 
Zheng MY, Lui H, Patino G, et al. J Patient Saf. 2022;18:e401-e406.
California law requires adverse events that led to serious injury or death because of hospital noncompliance to be reported to the state licensing agency. These events are referred to as “immediate jeopardy.” Using publicly available data, this study analyzed all immediate jeopardy cases between 2007 and 2017. Of the 385 immediate jeopardy cases, 36.6% led to patient death, and the most common category was surgical.
Sauro KM, Machan M, Whalen-Browne L, et al. J Patient Saf. 2021;17:e1285-e1295.
Hospital adverse events are common and can contribute to serious patient harm. This systematic review included 94 studies (representing 590 million admissions from 25 countries) examining trends in hospital adverse events from 1961 to 2014. Findings indicate that hospital adverse events have increased over time and that over half are considered preventable.
Fillo KT. Bureau of Health Care Safety and Quality, Department of Public Health. Boston, MA: Commonwealth of Massachusetts; 2020.
This reoccurring report compiles patient safety data documented by Massachusetts hospitals. The 2019 numbers represent a modest increase in serious reportable events recorded in acute care hospitals, from 1066 the previous year to 1189. This presentation also includes events from ambulatory surgery centers. Older reports are also available.

Levett-Jones T, ed. Clin Sim Nurs. 2020;44(1):1-78; 2020;45(1):1-60.

Simulation is a recognized technique to educate and plan to improve care processes and safety. This pair of special issues highlights the use of simulation in nursing and its value in work such as communication enhancement, minority population care, and patient deterioration.   

Halamek LP, ed. Semin Perinatol. 2019;43(8):151172-151182.
 

The neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) is a complex environment that serves a vulnerable population at increased risk for harm should errors occur. This special issue draws from a multidisciplinary set of authors to explore patient safety issues arising in the NICU. Included in the issue are articles examining topic such as video assessment, diagnostic error, and human factors engineering in the NICU.
Woeltje KF, Olenski LK, Donatelli M, et al. Joint Commission journal on quality and patient safety. 2019;45:480-486.
The Eisenberg Award honors individuals and organizations who have made important contributions to patient safety and quality improvement. Spotlighting the accomplishments of the 2018 recipients, this special issue includes an interview with Dr. Brent C. James, as well as articles on programs at The Society of Thoracic Surgeons and BJC HealthCare.
WebM&M Case April 1, 2019
An elderly man with a complicated medical history slipped on a rug at home, fell, and injured his hip. Emergency department evaluation and imaging revealed no head injury and a left intertrochanteric hip fracture. Although he was admitted to the orthopedic surgery service, with surgery to fix the fracture initially scheduled for the next day, the operation was delayed by 3 days due to several emergent trauma cases and lack of surgeon availability. He ultimately underwent surgery and was discharged a few days later but was readmitted several weeks later with chest pain and shortness of breath.
Sunshine JE, Meo N, Kassebaum NJ, et al. JAMA Netw Open. 2019;2:e187041.
The seminal report, To Err Is Human, famously estimated that 44,000 to 98,000 deaths per year in the United States were due to medical errors. Although certain patient harms thought to be unavoidable at the time of the report's publication in 1999 are now considered completely preventable, experts suggest that progress in the field of patient safety has been slower than initially anticipated and that areas such as ambulatory safety and diagnostic error represent emerging priorities. In this cohort study, researchers used data from 1990 through 2016 on mortality related to the adverse effects of medical treatment (AEMT) from the Global Burden of Diseases, Injuries, and Risk Factors 2016 study. For the study period, researchers attribute 123,603 deaths to AEMT. The number of such deaths increased, but the US age-standardized mortality rate for deaths due to AEMT decreased by 21% between 1990 and 2016. The authors noted similar AEMT mortality rates for men as compared to women, significantly increased AEMT mortality rates for those age 70 and older, and geographic variation with regard to age-standardized AEMT mortality rates. An Annual Perspective discussed challenges associated with measuring and responding to deaths associated with medical errors.

Health Aff (Millwood). 2018;37(11):1723-1908.

The Institute of Medicine report, To Err Is Human, marked the founding of the patient safety field. This special issue of Health Affairs, published 20 years after that report, highlights achievements and progress to date. One implementation study of evidence-based surgical safety checklists demonstrated that leadership involvement, intensive activities, and engagement of frontline staff are all critical to successful adoption of safety practices. Another study demonstrated that communication-and-resolution programs either decreased or did not affect malpractice costs, providing further support for implementing such programs. Experts describe the critical role of human factors engineering in patient safety and outline how to enhance the use of these methods. The concluding editorial by David Bates and Hardeep Singh points to progress in reducing hospital-acquired infections and improving medication safety in acute care settings and highlights remaining gaps in the areas of outpatient care, diagnostic errors, and electronic health record safety. In the related information, the Moore Foundation provides free access to five articles in this special issue.

Todd DW, Bennett JD, eds. Oral Maxillofac Surg Clin North Am. 2017;29:121-244.

Articles in this special issue provide insights into how human error can affect the safety of oral and maxillofacial surgery, a primarily ambulatory environment. The authors cover topics such as simulation training, wrong-site surgery, and the safety of office-based anesthesia.

J Health Serv Res Policy. 2015;20(suppl 1):S1-S60.

Articles in this special supplement explore research commissioned by National Institute for Health Research in the United Kingdom to address four patient safety research gaps: how organizational culture and context influence evaluations of interventions, organizational boundaries that affect handovers and other aspects of care, the role of the patient in safety improvement, and the economic costs and benefits of safety interventions.
Pronovost P, Jha AK. N Engl J Med. 2014;371:691-693.
In this commentary, the authors raise concerns about the validity of large-scale reductions in patient harms and readmissions reported by the Partnership for Patients Hospital Engagement Networks initiative. They describe how lack of standardized measures and peer review to evaluate the interventions may affect the reliability of the results.
Minnesota Hospital Association; MHA.
This Web site provides access to materials for patient safety improvement efforts in Minnesota, including initiatives to reduce adverse drug events and hospital collaboratives to implement best practices.

Martin RF, Sanchez JA, eds. Surg Clin North Am. 2012;92(1):1-177. 

This special issue includes articles exploring systems-oriented safety improvement in surgical care.

Simmons D, ed. Crit Care Nurs Clin North Am. 2010;22:161-290. 

Articles in this special issue discuss safe practices, effective staffing, teamwork, and event analysis to enhance patient safety in the critical care setting.
Austin, TX: Texas Medical Institute for Technology and the Quaid Foundation; 2010.
This documentary reports on families affected by medical errors; it includes the story of a high-profile heparin overdose and how it transformed the family of actor Dennis Quaid into advocates for patient safety.
Reynard J, Reynolds J, Stevenson P. Oxford, UK: Oxford University Press; 2009. ISBN: 9780199239931.
This book provides an introduction to key patient safety topics and includes a set of 20 case studies to demonstrate opportunities for error prevention.