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1 - 20 of 46
Burfeind KG, Zarnegarnia Y, Tekkali P, et al. Anesth Analg. 2022;Epub Aug 19.
The American Geriatrics Society (AGS) Beers Criteria serves as a guideline for prescribers to avoid potentially inappropriate medications (PIM) in geriatric patients (age 65 years and older). In this retrospective cohort study, nearly 70% of geriatric patients undergoing elective surgery received at least one PIM identified by the Beers Criteria. Patients, including cognitively impaired and frail patients, who received at least one PIM, had longer length of hospital stay after surgery.

Plymouth Meeting, PA: Institute for Safe Medication Practices; 2022.

Medication errors associated with surgery and other invasive procedures can result in patient harm. This 10-element guidance suggests effective practices to address identified weaknesses in perioperative and procedural medication processes. Recommendations provided cover topics such as drug labeling, communication, and risk management.
Keil O, Brunsmann K, Boethig D, et al. Paediatr Anaesth. 2022;32:1144-1150.
Harm from pediatric anesthesia-related errors is infrequent, but largely preventable. This pediatric hospital developed and implemented an anesthesia-specific checklist to be used before anesthesia induction. This study presents the types of errors identified by the checklist over the course of one year.
Parker H, Frost J, Day J, et al. PLoS ONE. 2022;17:e0271454.
Prophylactic antimicrobials are frequently prescribed for surgical patients despite the risks of antimicrobial overuse (e.g., resistance). This review summarizes how and why antimicrobials continue to be prescribed in surgical settings despite evidence of overuse. Eight overarching concepts were identified: hierarchy; fear drives action; deprioritized; convention trumps evidence; complex judgments; discontinuity of care; team dynamics; and practice environment.

A 78-year-old woman with macular degeneration presented for a pars plana vitrectomy (PPV) under monitored anesthesia care (MAC) with an eye block. At this particular hospital, eye cases under MAC are typically performed with an eye block by the surgeon after the anesthesiologist has administered some short-acting sedation, commonly with remifentanil. On this day, there was a shortage of premixed remifentanil and the resident – who was unfamiliar with the process of drug dilution – incorrectly diluted the remifentanil solution.

MedWatch Safety Alert. Silver Spring, MD: US Food and Drug Administration; January 27, 2021.  

Labeling mistakes in the pharmaceutical production cycle can remain undetected until the affected medication reaches a patient. This alert reports a recall of a neuromuscular blocker for use in surgery due to it being mislabeled as a medication to increase blood pressure. 

Ruskin KJ, ed. Curr Opin Anaesthesiol.  2020;33(6):774-822.

The complexity of care delivery requires complementary approaches to prevent mistakes. This special section shares clinical and organizational tactics to address anesthesiology safety issues. They include automation failures, the role of the obstetric anesthesiologist in maternal safety, and monitoring effectiveness. 
Barth RJ, Waljee JF. JAMA Surg. 2020;155:543-544.
This commentary discusses the harms of opioid overprescribing, particularly among opioid-naïve patients. The authors suggest that opioid dependence, abuse, or overdose in an opioid-naïve patient undergoing surgery should be considered a “never event” and discuss strategies for appropriate prescribing by surgeons.

Halamek LP, ed. Semin Perinatol. 2019;43(8):151172-151182.
 

The neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) is a complex environment that serves a vulnerable population at increased risk for harm should errors occur. This special issue draws from a multidisciplinary set of authors to explore patient safety issues arising in the NICU. Included in the issue are articles examining topic such as video assessment, diagnostic error, and human factors engineering in the NICU.
Bickham P, Golembiewski J, Meyer T, et al. Am J Health Syst Pharm. 2019;76:903-820.
Pharmacists working with surgical teams bring distinct safety context, expertise, and process awareness to perioperative care. These guidelines outline how pharmacists can help reduce medication errors before, during, and after surgery. Perioperative pharmacists can enhance communication, medication histories, and process reliability.
During surgery for a forearm fracture, a woman experienced a drop in heart rate to below 50 beats per minute. As the consultant anesthesiologist had stepped out to care for another patient, the resident asked the technician to draw up atropine for the patient. When the technician returned with an unlabeled syringe without the medication vial, the resident was reluctant to administer the medication, but did so without a double check after the technician insisted it was atropine. Over the next few minutes, the patient's blood pressure spiked to 250/135 mm Hg.
Marshall SD, Chrimes N. Anaesthesia. 2019;74:280-284.
Medication errors in anesthesia practice can result in serious patient harm. This commentary examines factors that affect safety of medication delivery in the operating room. The authors provide recommendations to help individuals improve the reliability of their practice and describe human factors to consider to enhance safety.
Litman RS. J Patient Saf Risk Manag. 2019;24:158-165.
This commentary explores how gaps in legal and regulatory structure affect anesthesia medication safety. The author advocates for use of a public health law framework to prevent certain types of perioperative medication errors made by anesthesiologists. Policy approaches that require organizations to provide prefilled syringes and barcoding scanners are suggested to avoid vial- and syringe-related mistakes.
Stucke RS, Kelly JL, Mathis KA, et al. JAMA Surg. 2018;153:1105-1110.
Many states are implementing prescription drug monitoring programs (PDMPs) in an attempt to curb the ongoing opioid epidemic. This single-center study examined the effect of a New Hampshire policy that mandates clinicians use a PDMP and an opioid risk assessment tool prior to prescribing opioids. No impact was found on overall opioid prescribing rates. However, a recent state-level analysis found that states who implemented a PDMP had lower opioid prescribing rates compared to states without PDMPs. A PSNet perspective discussed the factors that contributed to the opioid epidemic and proposed solutions.
Meyer TA, McAllister RK. Pharmacy Practice News. March 19, 2018.
Perioperative adverse drug events are common and understudied. Reporting on the complexity of medication administration during surgery, this news article reviews strategies to reduce risks of surgical adverse drug events. Specific tactics discussed include proactive problem identification, medication reconciliation, high-alert medication process vigilance, verbal order reduction, and information technology optimization.

Todd DW, Bennett JD, eds. Oral Maxillofac Surg Clin North Am. 2017;29:121-244.

Articles in this special issue provide insights into how human error can affect the safety of oral and maxillofacial surgery, a primarily ambulatory environment. The authors cover topics such as simulation training, wrong-site surgery, and the safety of office-based anesthesia.
Group S and P in LS. Br J Surg. 2015;102:1204-12.
This controlled study evaluated the effect of a protocolled pharmacist intervention—which included medication reconciliation and regular medication review—on medication errors in elective surgery patients. There was no difference in the incidence of adverse drug events compared to patients receiving usual care.
Following general anesthesia for hip repair surgery, an elderly woman with a history of hypertension and obesity developed hypercarbic respiratory failure and was reintubated in the recovery unit. Providers felt the patient had undiagnosed obstructive sleep apnea and questioned whether obese patients undergoing anesthesia should receive formal preoperative screening for it.