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The PSNet Collection: All Content

The AHRQ PSNet Collection comprises an extensive selection of resources relevant to the patient safety community. These resources come in a variety of formats, including literature, research, tools, and Web sites. Resources are identified using the National Library of Medicine’s Medline database, various news and content aggregators, and the expertise of the AHRQ PSNet editorial and technical teams.

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Displaying 1 - 11 of 11 Results
Graham J.
Patients can identify errors in their medical records that health care providers may not recognize. This news article highlights the importance of patients correcting seemingly simple mistakes such as name misspellings and phone numbers as these errors can contribute to situations that result in patient harm.
Whitman E. Mod Healthc. September 25, 2016.
Misidentification of patients can result in problems such as medication administration delays, blood transfusion mismatches, and wrong-patient surgery. This magazine article reviews recent research on this issue and suggests several system approaches for improvement, including the use of patient photos in electronic health records and standardizing patient identification processes.
St Paul, MN: Minnesota Department of Health; 2015.
This report provides background on the Minnesota Never Events reporting initiative, tips for patients on how to receive the safest care possible, and a table of events reported by all hospitals in the state.
Feldman R
In this article, a nurse shares her firsthand account of what it was like to be a surgical patient and the surprising safety and quality shortcomings she encountered during her hospital stay.
Scobie S, Thomson R. London, UK : National Patient Safety Agency; 2005.
Created in 2001 to institute changes in health care across the United Kingdom, the National Patient Safety Agency (NPSA) presents their first report of patient safety incidents. The two-part report begins with a general discussion of incident reporting, the basis for a national reporting system, and the development of the Patient Safety Observatory. The second part builds on this framework by discussing how the acquired data can be used and translated into safer health care strategies. The report itself encompasses more than 85,000 collected incident reports with analysis, comparisons, and case studies to illustrate important safety issues for future efforts. This represents the first of a series of expected reports from NPSA on patient safety data to be published.