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The PSNet Collection: All Content

The AHRQ PSNet Collection comprises an extensive selection of resources relevant to the patient safety community. These resources come in a variety of formats, including literature, research, tools, and Web sites. Resources are identified using the National Library of Medicine’s Medline database, various news and content aggregators, and the expertise of the AHRQ PSNet editorial and technical teams.

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Curated Libraries
September 13, 2021
Ensuring maternal safety is a patient safety priority. This library reflects a curated selection of PSNet content focused on improving maternal safety. Included resources explore strategies with the potential to improve maternal care delivery and outcomes, such as high reliability, care standardization,teamwork, unit-based safety initiatives, and...

The International Society for Quality in Health Care. March - May 2020.

The COVID-19 pandemic is a worldwide crisis that requires organizations, governments, and individuals to draw from the collective experience and rapidly improve practice. This series of webinars discuss a variety of foci to share experience from the field. Topics covered include human factors engineering, clinician support, and communication.
Srinivasa S, Gurney J, Koea J. JAMA Surg. 2019;154:451-457.
As many as half of all clinicians may be involved in a serious adverse event during their career, and these events may have profound professional consequences. This systematic review examined the effect of patient complications on surgeons' well-being. Patient complications had significant adverse consequences for surgeons' emotional health, to which surgeons responded with coping mechanisms ranging from adaptive (discussing cases with colleagues or utilizing professional support) to maladaptive (alcohol or substance use). Studies reported varying perceptions of institutional support. Many surgeons derived benefit from the support of trusted mentors or senior colleagues after a serious patient complication, but lack of formal organizational support was commonly noted. Surgeons reported taking various corrective actions after a complication, such as personal development and system-level quality improvement efforts. The authors make several recommendations for helping surgeons after complications, including developing formal structures to aid surgeons in the coping process. Books by British neurosurgeon Dr. Henry Marsh and patient safety leader Dr. Atul Gawande explore the professional and personal consequences of adverse events in vivid detail.