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The PSNet Collection: All Content

The AHRQ PSNet Collection comprises an extensive selection of resources relevant to the patient safety community. These resources come in a variety of formats, including literature, research, tools, and Web sites. Resources are identified using the National Library of Medicine’s Medline database, various news and content aggregators, and the expertise of the AHRQ PSNet editorial and technical teams.

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Displaying 1 - 10 of 10 Results
Dubé MM, Kaba A, Cronin T, et al. Adv Simul (Lond). 2020;5:22.
This article describes the planning and implementation of a multi-site, multidisciplinary simulation program to provide critical just-in-time COVID-19 education in one Canadian province. The authors discuss the unique features and advantages of a centralized simulation response and key themes of the simulation program.
Musunur S, Waineo E, Walton E, et al. Acad Psychiatry. 2020;44:586-591.
This article describes the impact of an interactive session with second-year medical students utilizing case-based learning, small group discussion, and video vignettes intended to prepare healthcare providers to anticipate and understand the impact of medical errors. Pre- and post-surveys found that this one-hour, small-group session increased medical students’ understanding of the impact of medical errors and adverse events and the resources available to support providers.
Ingrassia PL, Capogna G, Diaz-Navarro C, et al. Adv Simul (Lond). 2020;5:13.
The authors of this article outline ten recommendations for safely reopening simulation facilities for clinical training in the post-lockdown phase of the COVID-19 crisis. The recommendations are based on national guidance and regulations, as well as international public health recommendations. Future reopening activities should focus on safety as well as flexibility principles, taking different contexts and facility characteristics into account.
Anderson N, Thompson K, Andrews J, et al. J Med Radiat Sci. 2020;67:243-248.
This article describes the delivery of radiation therapy services during the COVID-19 pandemic at one cancer center in Australia, and the risk mitigation strategies used to enhance continuity of care while minimizing the risk of infection among patients and healthcare workers. 
Tannenbaum SI, Traylor AM, Thomas EJ, et al. BMJ Qual Saf. 2021;30:59-63.
This article summarizes evidence-based recommendations for team-based patient care during the COVID-19 pandemic. These recommendations focus on team functioning, safety culture, and resilience. The authors discuss how individual-, team-, and organizational-level stressors, as well as work-life stressors, can affect team performance. 
Chou R, Dana T, Buckley DI, et al. Ann Intern Med. 2020;173:120-136.
Viral outbreaks such as the COVID-19 pandemic place healthcare workers at risk for both adverse physical health and psychological outcomes. This evidence review examined 64 studies assessing the impact of COVID-19, Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS), and Middle East Respiratory Syndrome (MERS) on healthcare workers and risk factors for infection. Healthcare workers accounted for a significant proportion of infections but illness severity was lower among healthcare workers than non-healthcare workers (possibly due to younger age and fewer comorbidities).  Use of personal protective equipment (PPE) and infection control training were associated with decreased infection risk.

The International Society for Quality in Health Care. March - May 2020.

The COVID-19 pandemic is a worldwide crisis that requires organizations, governments, and individuals to draw from the collective experience and rapidly improve practice. This series of webinars discuss a variety of foci to share experience from the field. Topics covered include human factors engineering, clinician support, and communication.
Houghton C, Meskell P, Delaney H, et al. Cochrane Database Syst Rev. 2020;4:CD013582.
To support the needs of healthcare workers during the COVID-19 pandemic, this rapid evidence review of qualitative research studies sought to identify barriers and facilitators to healthcare workers adherence to infection prevention and control guidelines for respiratory infectious diseases. The authors included 20 studies in their analysis; these studies explored the views and experiences of nurses, doctors and other healthcare workers working in hospitals, primary care, and community care settings dealing with infectious diseases such as SARS, H1N1, MERS, TB, or seasonal influenza. Identified barriers included local guidelines that were lengthy, ambiguous or not reflective of national or international continuously changing guidelines, lack of support from management to adhere to guidelines, and lack of high-quality personal protective equipment (PPE). Facilitators to guideline adherence included clear communication and training about the infection and use of PPE, sufficient space to isolate patients, workplace safety culture, and perceived value of adhering to infection prevention and control guidelines.

National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. Washington, DC; The National Academies Press: 2020. ISBN 9780309676250.

Patient safety is challenged during public health emergencies. This report examines a 10-year initiative to develop crisis preparedness standards. The material covers how to proactively apply the program’s experience to assess legal and ethical considerations, learn from federal and state initiatives, address challenges and design steps to continue progress.