Skip to main content

The PSNet Collection: All Content

The AHRQ PSNet Collection comprises an extensive selection of resources relevant to the patient safety community. These resources come in a variety of formats, including literature, research, tools, and Web sites. Resources are identified using the National Library of Medicine’s Medline database, various news and content aggregators, and the expertise of the AHRQ PSNet editorial and technical teams.

Search All Content

Search Tips
Selection
Format
Download
Filter By Author(s)
Advanced Filtering Mode
Date Ranges
Published Date
Original Publication Date
Original Publication Date
PSNet Publication Date
Additional Filters
Approach to Improving Safety
Clinical Area
Safety Target
Selection
Format
Download
Displaying 1 - 20 of 154 Results
Roussel M, Teissandier D, Yordanov Y, et al. JAMA Intern Med. 2023;Epub Nov 6.
Overcrowding in the emergency department (ED) can result in long wait times to be seen or admitted, as well as placing patients at increased risk of adverse events. In this prospective study, researchers compared the risk of in-hospital mortality among older patients who spent a night in the ED waiting for admission to the hospital versus older patients who were admitted to the hospital before midnight. Findings indicate that patients who spent an overnight in the ED had a higher in-hospital mortality rate, increased risk of adverse events, and longer length of stay; this risk was exacerbated for patients with limited functional status.
Liepelt S, Sundal H, Kirchhoff R. BMC Health Serv Res. 2023;23:1224.
Root cause analysis (RCA) is a frequently used, and sometimes mandatory, method to investigate sentinel events. In this study, members of an RCA committee were interviewed before and after an RCA investigation to elicit their experiences and assess compliance with the Norwegian RCA process. Organizational factors and team composition presented challenges, particularly the inclusion of staff closely involved with the incident under investigation.
Hald EJ, Gillespie A, Reader TW. J Contingencies Crisis Manage. 2023;31:752-766.
Including both patient/relative and staff perspectives in investigations provides a deeper understanding of the event. This study applies natural language processing methodology to 40 staff and 53 patient/relative witness statements into a C. difficile outbreak in a UK trust. This novel method revealed that staff identified a lack of training and understaffing, whereas patients/relatives identified communication failures and the physical environment as contributing factors.

Rockville, MD: Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality; September 2023. AHRQ Publication no. 23-0055.

Falls are a frequently reported sentinel event. This Data Spotlight from AHRQ’s Network of Patient Safety Databases (NPSD) highlights the most common interventions in place among patients who experienced a fall such as nonslip wear, bed height and visible risk identification. Data for the analysis includes reports on patient safety concerns submitted from 2009 through 2021.
Beauvais B, Dolezel D, Ramamonjiarivelo Z. Healthcare (Basel). 2023;11:2758.
Patient safety improvement efforts involve financial expenditures, which means that hospital leaders must evaluate their return on investment. This study examines the association of several quality-of-care measures and hospital profitability as measured by patient revenue per adjusted discharge. Better patient satisfaction, lower readmission rates, and three of the four Hospital Value-Based Purchasing Program (HVBP) domains were associated with improved financial outcomes.

Rockville, MD: Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality; September 2023. AHRQ Publication no. 23-0082.

The sharing of data is a core element of a learning health system. AHRQ has released the Network of Patient Safety Databases (NPSD) Chartbook 2023, which offers an overview of nonidentifiable, aggregated patient safety event and near-miss information, voluntarily reported by AHRQ-listed Patient Safety Organizations across the country between June 2014 and December 2022. The chartbook outlines the extent of harm reported, distribution of patient safety events, near misses, and unsafe conditions. 

Maxwell A. Washington DC: Office of Inspector General; September 2023. Report no. OEI-05-22-00290.

Falls are a persistent threat to patient safety and effective reporting of this adverse event can assist in understanding important gaps in care. This report examines the incidence of Medicare home health patients experiencing falls with major injury resulting in hospitalization that were not reported as required. 55% of falls were not documented thusly negatively impacting the viability of Care Compare as a reliable public resource for this information.

United States Office of the Inspector General: 2010-2023.

Large-scale data analysis provides insights to generate evidence-based improvement action. This collection of reports provides access to investigations of the impact of healthcare-related harm events in Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) programs and across the United States health system. This set of publications not only examines weaknesses but provides recommendations for improvement on topics such as gaps in fall reporting by home health agencies, Medicare adverse events and the viability of payment incentives as a strategy for medical harm reduction.

Rockville, MD: Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality: November 2023.

Patient safety progress is dynamic, consistently producing evidence for application to generate improvements. This report is the fourth in a series funded by the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality to track a prioritized set of emerging and existing safety approaches to confirm their value and effectiveness. This report will be compiled as new conclusions are formulated. Each review will be posted to the collection as they are completed. The first three Making Healthcare Safer reports, published in 2001, 2013, and 2020, have each served as a consolidated evidence source for clinicians, health system leadership, researchers, and government agencies. Chapter protocols and the results of an examination on patient and family engagement and report cards as a surgical improvement mechanism are now available. 
Pogorzelska-Maziarz M, de Cordova PB, Manning ML, et al. Am J Infect Control. 2023;Epub Aug 23.
The COVID-19 pandemic highlighted systemic weaknesses in the healthcare system. This survey of 3,067 registered nurses working in New Jersey used the Donabedian framework to identify challenges related to providing safe care during the pandemic. Respondents identified several organizational factors, including inadequate resources and staffing, which adversely impacted their ability to adhere to patient safety and infection prevention and control protocols during the pandemic.

World Health Organization.

The sharing of best practices is a key component of enabling successful strategy implementation in support of patient safety plans and goals. This website will capture, organize, and share experiences worldwide to support knowledge sharing and community building to reduce World Patient Safety Day targeted challenges.

Stratford, London; The National Guardian.

Organizational efforts to collect and respond to the concerns of staff and patients are a cornerstone to patient safety improvement despite challenges to implement them. This annual report presents insights drawn from problems staff share with Freedom to Speak Up Guardians in the United Kingdom to capitalize on problems to drive improvement. The 2023 report summarized data collected from over 25,000 cases recorded.
McGurgan P. Aust N Z J Obstet Gynaecol. 2023;63:606-611.
Individual-, team-, and systems-based factors can affect safety during childbirth. This article discusses several patient safety threats that can hinder the safety of vaginal birth after cesarean (VAC) deliveries in high population density areas, including staffing and resource limitations, cultural and human factors, and patient communication.

Washington, DC: United States Government Accounting Office; July 10, 2023.  Publication GAO-23-105722.

Health information systems are fundamental tools for documenting adverse event trends within and across patient populations. This report highlights weaknesses in the web-based incident reporting system employed to track quality of care for American Indians and Alaska Natives. Recommendations for improvement focus on increasing leadership engagement and use of the data collected to examine instances of patient harm or near misses in the American Indians and Alaska Native patient population.
Hibbert PD, Molloy CJ, Schultz TJ, et al. Int J Qual Health Care. 2023;35:mzad056.
Accurate and reliable detection and measurement of adverse events remains challenging. This systematic review examined the difference in adverse events detected using the Global Trigger Tool compared to those detected via incident reporting systems. In 12 of the 14 included studies, less than 10% of adverse events detected using the Global Trigger Tool were also found in corresponding incident reporting systems. The authors of the review emphasize the importance of using multiple approaches and sources of patient safety data to enhance adverse event detection.
Alanazi FK, Lapkin S, Molloy L, et al. Intensive Crit Care Nurs. 2023;78:103480.
Safety culture, nurses' safety attitudes, and staffing ratios have been shown to impact fall rates and other healthcare associated events. This study assessed if healthcare-associated infections (HAIs) could be associated with nurses' safety attitudes and other quality and safety metrics in the intensive care unit (ICU). Increased job satisfaction was associated with lower rates of HAI, as were lower rates of missed care. The study also found nurses' perceptions and actual incidence of two HAI were positively correlated, suggesting nurses can provide valuable information on HAIs and HAI reduction efforts.
Duhalde H, Bjuresäter K, Karlsson I, et al. Int Emerg Nurs. 2023;69:101296.
Missed nursing care (MNC) refers to needed nursing care that is delayed, partially completed, or not completed at all, and can result in adverse events. This systematic review summarizes missed nursing care in emergency departments (ED). Causes of MNC include overcrowding and patients with complex care needs, which may result in medication errors, pressure injuries, or patient deterioration.
Alfred MC, Wilson D, DeForest E, et al. Jt Comm J Qual Patient Saf. 2023;Epub Jun 15.
In the United States, women and birthing people of color experience disproportionately high rates of mortality and severe maternal morbidity (SMM). Researchers analyzed two years of incident reports (IR) to ascertain potential system issues contributing to SMM and racial/ethnic disparities at one hospital. Non-Hispanic Black individuals were over-represented in IRs, but there were no statistically significant differences in harm level.