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Sharma AE, Rivadeneira NA, Barr-Walker J, et al. Health Aff (Millwood). 2018;37:1813-1820.
Patient and family engagement efforts can affect health care quality and safety. This review examined the research on patient engagement efforts and found evidence of robust examinations of patient engagement related to patient self-management of anticoagulation medications. However, there was mixed-quality evidence on patient involvement in medication administration errors, documentation and scheduling accuracy, hospital readmissions, and health care–associated infections. They recommend areas of research needed to guide the application of patient engagement strategies.
Papadopoulos I, Koulouglioti C, Ali S. Contemp Nurse. 2018;54:425-442.
Robotics are increasingly used to assist in both complicated and routine activities in health care. Although safety hazards associated with robotic technologies have been explored in surgery, risks related to purely assistive devices is understudied. This review highlights clinician perspectives regarding assistive robots in health care and highlights infection control and reliability issues as concerns associated with their use.
Yardley I, Yardley S, Williams H, et al. Palliat Med. 2018;32:1353-1362.
The frequency and nature of adverse events experienced by patients receiving palliative care remains unknown. In this mixed-methods study, researchers analyzed patient safety incidents among patients receiving palliative care from a national database in England over a 12-year period. They found that pressure ulcers, medication errors, and falls were the most frequently reported types of events and conclude that there is significant opportunity to improve the safety of palliative care.
Ma C, Park SH, Shang J. Int J Nurs Stud. 2018;85:1-6.
Teamwork training interventions enhance both clinical outcomes and safety culture. This cross-sectional survey found hospital units that nurses rated as more collaborative had lower rates of both hospital-acquired pressure ulcers and falls. A PSNet Interview discusses how the nursing work environment affects patient safety.
Cooper J, Williams H, Hibbert P, et al. Bull World Health Organ. 2018;96:498-505.
The World Health Organization International Classification for Patient Safety enables measurement of safety incident severity. In this study, researchers describe how they adapted the system to primary care. Their harm severity classification emphasizes psychological harm, hospitalizations, near misses, and uncertain outcomes in addition to traditional markers of harm.
Krein SL, Mayer J, Harrod M, et al. JAMA Intern Med. 2018;178:1016-1057.
Infection control precautions including use of personal protective equipment (PPE) are critical for preventing transmission of infections within health care settings. This direct observation study observed frequent failures in use of PPE, including entering rooms without using PPE at all, PPE process mistakes, and slips in properly executing PPE use. The authors suggest that given the wide range of failures, a variety of strategies are needed to improve use of PPE.