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English M, Ogola M, Aluvaala J, et al. Arch Dis Child. 2021;106:326-332.
Health systems are encouraged to proactively identify patient safety risks. In the first of a two-part series, the authors draw on the  Systems Engineering Initiative for Patient Safety (SEIPS) framework  to discuss the strengths and challenge of a low-resource newborn unit from a systems perspective and SEIPS’ implications for patient safety.
Vincent CA, Mboga M, Gathara D, et al. Arch Dis Child. 2021;106:333-337.
In the second of a two-part series, using examples from newborn units, the authors present a framework for supporting practitioners in low-resource settings to improve patient safety across four areas: (1) prioritizing critical processes, (2) improving the organization of care, (3) control of risks, and (4) enhancing responses to hazardous situations.
Tartari E, Saris K, Kenters N, et al. PLoS One. 2020;15.
Presenteeism among healthcare workers can lead to burnout and healthcare-associated infections, but prior research has found that significant numbers of healthcare workers continue to work despite having influenza-like illness. This study surveyed 249 healthcare workers and 284 non-healthcare workers from 49 countries about their behaviors when experiencing influenza-like illness between October 2018 and January 2019. Overall, 59% of workers would continue to work when experiencing influenza-like illness, and the majority of healthcare workers (89.2-99.2%) and non-healthcare workers (80-96.5%) would continue to work with mild symptoms, such as a mild cough, fatigue or sinus cold.  Fewer non-healthcare workers (16.2%) than healthcare workers (26.9%) would continue working with fever alone.
Sholomovich L, Magnezi R. Am J Infect Control. 2017;45:677-681.
Health care–associated infections (HAIs) are a significant source of preventable harm to patients. Although prior research has shown that clean hands are essential for reducing HAIs, health care institutions continue to struggle with hand hygiene compliance. In this study, investigators surveyed 400 nurses at a pediatric hospital and found a positive correlation between psychological safety and belief in personal responsibility for preventing the spread of infection. The authors argue that improving the psychological safety of staff may augment the response to hand hygiene initiatives.
Geneva, Switzerland: World Alliance for Patient Safety, World Health Organization. 2006-2007.
This publication shared news related to the World Health Organization's first Global Patient Safety Challenge "Clean Care is Safer Care" from 2006 to 2007.