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Metersky ML, Eldridge N, Wang Y, et al. J Patient Saf. 2022;18:253-259.
The July Effect is a belief that the quality of care delivered in academic medical centers decreases during July and August due to the arrival of new trainees. Using data from the Medicare Patient Safety Monitoring System, this retrospective cohort, including over 185,000 hospital admissions from 2010 to 2017, found that patients admitted to teaching hospitals in July and August did not experience higher rates of adverse events compared to patients admitted to non-teaching hospitals.
Chopra V, O'Malley M, Horowitz J, et al. BMJ Qual Saf. 2022;31:23-30.
Peripherally inserted central catheters (PICC) represent a key source of preventable harm. Using the Michigan Appropriateness Guide for Intravenous Catheters (MAGIC), the authors sought to determine if the appropriateness of PICC use decreased related medical complications including catheter occlusion, venous thromboembolism, and central line-associated bloodstream infections. Use of MAGIC in 52 Michigan hospitals increased appropriate use of PICC lines and decreased medical complications. In a 2019 PSNet Perspective, Dr. Vineet Chopra described the development and implementation of MAGIC in Michigan hospitals.  

Harolds JA, Harolds LB. Clin Nucl Med. 2015–2021.

This monthly commentary explores a wide range of subjects associated with patient safety, such as infection prevention, surgical quality improvement, and high reliability organizations.

Elsabeth Kalenderian, DDS, MPH, PhD is a professor at UCSF. Muhammad F. Walji, PhD is the Associate Dean for Technology Services and Informatics and professor for Diagnostic and Biomedical Sciences at the UT Health Science Center at Houston, School of Dentistry. We spoke to them about the identification and prevention of adverse events in dentistry.   

Chang BH, Hsu Y-J, Rosen MA, et al. Am J Med Qual. 2020;35:37-45.
Preventing health care–associated infections remains a patient safety priority. This multisite study compared rates of central line–associated bloodstream infections, surgical site infections, and ventilator-associated pneumonia before and after implementation of a multifaceted intervention. Investigators adopted the comprehensive unit-based safety program, which emphasizes safety culture and includes staff education, identification of safety risks, leadership engagement, and team training. Central line–associated bloodstream infections and surgical site infections initially declined, but rates returned to baseline in the third year. They were unable to measure differences in ventilator-associated pneumonia rates due to a change in the definition. These results demonstrate the challenge of implementing and sustaining evidence-based safety practices in real-world clinical settings. A past PSNet interview discussed infection prevention and patient safety.

Livingston E, Howell EA. JAMA Clinical Reviews. April 2, 2019.

Maternal mortality in the United States is gaining increased attention as a patient safety concern. This podcast discusses conditions known to challenge maternal safety, the high incidence of preventable harm in this population, and care bundles as an improvement strategy. A recent Annual Perspective summarized national initiatives to improve safety in maternity care.
Wong LP. Semin Dial. 2019;32:266-273.
Patients with end-stage renal disease are vulnerable to adverse events in dialysis. This commentary outlines a team-based approach to improving safety in dialysis care. The authors highlight the importance of multidisciplinary teamwork, accountability, and coleadership to develop high-functioning teams for safe dialysis.
Young S, Shapiro FE, Urman RD. Curr Opin Anaesthesiol. 2018;31:707-712.
Office-based surgery is increasingly common, despite concerns regarding its safety. This review summarizes the literature on ambulatory surgery outcomes and identified risk factors such as case complexity, patient comorbidities, and anesthesia use. Few studies examined anesthesia use in dental care.
Hagley GW, Mills PD, Shiner B, et al. Phys Ther. 2018;98:223-230.
This analysis of the Veterans Health Administration root cause analysis database identified adverse events that occurred during rehabilitation services, such as physical therapy, occupational therapy, or speech and language therapy. Rehabilitation-related adverse events were extremely rare. The most common incidents were falls and delayed response to clinical deterioration.
Murray P. Washington, DC; Senate Health, Education, Labor, and Pensions Committee; 2016.
Insufficient sterilization of duodenoscopes and other medical equipment has been linked to health care–associated infection outbreaks. This report summarizes findings from a government investigation into existing methods for monitoring and reporting device problems and provides recommendations for Congress, hospitals, and the Food and Drug Administration to augment identification and prevention of safety issues associated with medical devices.
In a simulation exercise conducted in an institution that felt it was prepared for patients with actual or suspected Ebola, a man presented to the emergency department with symptoms of nausea, vomiting, and fever. He had recently returned to the US from Sierra Leone. The nurse initiated an isolation protocol and the critical care team all donned personal protective equipment. During transport, confusion about which elevators to use potentially exposed 30 staff members to Ebola.
D'Amour D, Dubois C-A, Tchouaket E, et al. Int J Nurs Stud. 2014;51:882-91.
Accurately detecting safety events remains challenging, and health care organizations are still struggling to determine the incidence of adverse outcomes associated with nursing care. This study used chart reviews to identify the rates of six adverse events considered to be directly related to nursing care: pressure sores, falls, medication administration errors, pneumonia, urinary infections, and inappropriate use of restraints. One in seven hospitalized adults experienced at least one of these adverse events.
Booth CMA, Moore CE, Eddleston J, et al. Postgrad Med J. 2011;87:694-9.
The obesity epidemic is considered an urgent public health issue in Europe and the United States. Although morbidly obese patients are prone to a variety of medical issues, no study to date has evaluated patient safety risks in this population. This retrospective analysis of errors voluntarily reported to the United Kingdom's National Patient Safety Agency documents more than 380 errors and near misses in which obesity was considered a contributing factor. The majority of errors were partly attributable to inadequate equipment for caring for such patients, particularly in the surgical and critical care environments. Based on these data, the authors advocate for multidisciplinary approaches to systematizing care for morbidly obese patients. The challenges of caring for obese patients are discussed in an AHRQ WebM&M commentary, which examined a case of an ultimately fatal delayed diagnosis in a morbidly obese woman.
A man with end-stage renal disease on hemodialysis was dialyzed with equipment that had been inappropriately reused, exposing the patient to another patient's blood numerous times.