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Saleem J, Sarma D, Wright H, et al. J Patient Saf. 2022;18:152-160.
Hospitals employ a variety of strategies to prevent inpatient falls. Based on data from incident reports, this study used process mapping to identify opportunities to improve timely diagnosis of serious injury resulting from inpatient falls. Researchers found that multiple interventions (e.g., education, changes in the transport process) with small individual effects resulted in a substantial cumulative positive impact on delays in the diagnosis of serious harm resulting from a fall.
Murata M, Nakagawa N, Kawasaki T, et al. Am J Emerg Med. 2022;52:13-19.
Transporting critically ill patients within a hospital (e.g., to radiology for diagnostic procedures) is necessary but also poses safety threats. The authors conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis of all types of adverse events, critical or life-threatening adverse events, and death occurring during intra-hospital transport. Results indicate that adverse events can occur in intra-hospital transport, and that frequency of critical adverse events and death are low.

James Augustine, MD, is the National Director of Prehospital Strategy at US Acute Care Solutions where he provides service as a Fire EMS Medical Director. We spoke with him about threats and concerns for patient safety for EMS when responding to a 911 call.

DiSilvio B, Virani A, Patel S, et al. Crit Care Nurs Q. 2020;43:413-427.
This article discusses several aspects essential to surge planning and preparing for the COVID-19 pandemic, including surge planning, limiting health care worker exposure, logistics for medication delivery, delivering emergent care in patients with COVID-19, and safe practices for patient transport.
Imach S, Eppich WJ, Zech A, et al. Simul Healthc. 2020;15.
This case study describes the use of root cause analysis to investigate a critical incident occurring during an emergency medicine simulation scenario, and discusses the importance of these investigations in furthering the training of emergency medicine personnel and instructors.

J Health Serv Res Policy. 2015;20(suppl 1):S1-S60.

Articles in this special supplement explore research commissioned by National Institute for Health Research in the United Kingdom to address four patient safety research gaps: how organizational culture and context influence evaluations of interventions, organizational boundaries that affect handovers and other aspects of care, the role of the patient in safety improvement, and the economic costs and benefits of safety interventions.
Vilensky D, MacDonald RD. Prehosp Emerg Care. 2011;15:39-43.
This study analyzed communication errors during call bookings for air medical transport and found both human and process-driven root causes. Examples of major errors identified were commissions of allergies to medications and omissions of intubations from records.
Gustafsson M, Wennerholm S, Fridlund B. Intensive Crit Care Nurs. 2010;26:138-45.
Few studies have addressed patient safety issues during inter-hospital patient transport. This Swedish study used critical incident debriefing techniques to explore factors leading to potential safety problems during transport, based on the perceptions of experienced transport nurses.