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The PSNet Collection: All Content

The AHRQ PSNet Collection comprises an extensive selection of resources relevant to the patient safety community. These resources come in a variety of formats, including literature, research, tools, and Web sites. Resources are identified using the National Library of Medicine’s Medline database, various news and content aggregators, and the expertise of the AHRQ PSNet editorial and technical teams.

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Displaying 1 - 20 of 433 Results
WebM&M Case February 1, 2023

This WebM&M highlights two cases of hospital-acquired diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) in patients with type 1 diabetes. The commentary discusses the role of the inpatient glycemic team to assist with diabetes management, the importance of medication reconciliation in the emergency department (ED) for high-risk patients on insulin, and strategies to empower patients and caregivers to speak up about medication safety.

Sallevelt BTGM, Egberts TCG, Huibers CJA, et al. Drug Saf. 2022;45:1501-1516.
Adverse events, such as medication errors, are a major cause of hospital admissions. This retrospective study of a subset of OPERAM intervention patients who were readmitted with a potentially preventable drug-related admission (DRA) examined whether use of STOPP/START criteria during in-hospital medication review can identify medication errors prior to a potentially preventable DRA. Researchers found that medication errors identified at readmission could not be addressed by prior in-hospital medication reviews because the medication error occurred after the in-hospital review or because recommended medication regimen changes were not provided or not implemented.
Department of Health and Aged Care. Canberra ACT: Commonwealth of Australia; 2022. ISBN 978-1-76007-471-5.
Originally published in 2005, these Guiding Principles outlines 10 guiding principles to support medication management as patients transfer from one care environment to another, both within one care setting (e.g., hospital) and between care settings (e.g., hospital to long term care). The Guiding Principles are person centered, equity, and coordination and collaboration.
Johansen JS, Halvorsen KH, Svendsen K, et al. BMC Health Serv Res. 2022;22:1290.
Reducing unplanned hospital readmissions is a priority patient safety focus, and numerous interventions with hospital pharmacists have been developed. In this study, hospitalized adults aged 70 years and older were randomized to receive standard care or the IMMENSE intervention. The IMprove MEdicatioN Safety in the Elderly (IMMENSE) intervention is based on the integrated medicine management (IMM) model and consists of five steps, including medication reconciliation, patient counseling, and communication with the patient’s primary care provider. There was no significant difference in emergency department visits or readmissions between control and intervention within 12 months of the index hospital visit.
Iturgoyen Fuentes DP, Meneses Mangas C, Cuervas Mons Vendrell M. Eur J Hosp Pharm. 2022;Epub Sep 30.
Medication reconciliation at hospital admission has reduced medication errors, but less is known about the pediatric population, particularly which patients may benefit most from reconciliation. This retrospective study of pediatric patients who experienced at least one medication reconciliation error found children older than 5 years, taking 4 or more medications, or with neurological or onco-hematological conditions were at increased risk of errors. Prioritization of these populations may improve the effectiveness of medication reconciliation.
Laing L, Salema N-E, Jeffries M, et al. PLoS ONE. 2022;17:e0275633.
Previous research found that the pharmacist-led IT-based intervention to reduce clinically important medication errors (PINCER) can reduce prescription and medication monitoring errors. This qualitative study explored patients’ perceived acceptability of the PINCER intervention in primary care. Overall perceptions were positive, but participants noted that PINCER acceptability can be improved through enhanced patient-pharmacist relationships, consistent delivery of PINCER-related care, and synchronization of medication reviews with prescription renewals.
Beerlage-Davids CJ, Ponjee GHM, Vanhommerig JW, et al. Int J Clin Pharm. 2022;44:1434-1441.
Older adults taking multiple medications are at increased risk for adverse drug events following hospital discharge. In this study, patients were contacted two weeks after hospital discharge to evaluate adverse events, adverse drug events, and health-related quality of life (HRQoL). There was a weak but significant correlation between patient-reported adverse events and HRQoL, but not patient-reported adverse drug events.  
Punj E, Collins A, Agravedi N, et al. Pharmacol Res Perspect. 2022;10:e01007.
Pharmacists play an important role in preventing medication errors. This systematic review identified 17 studies showing that pharmacy teams working in acute or emergency medicine departments can reduce medication errors through medication reconciliation.
Yuan CT, Dy SM, Yuanhong Lai A, et al. Am J Med Qual. 2022;37:379-387.
Patient safety in ambulatory care settings is receiving increased attention. Based on interviews and focus groups with patients, providers, and staff at ten patient-centered medical homes, this qualitative study explored perceived facilitators and barriers to improving safety in ambulatory care. Participants identified several safety issues, including communication failures and challenges with medication reconciliation, and noted the importance of health information systems and dedicated resources to advance patient safety. Patients also emphasized the importance of engagement in developing safety solutions. A recent PSNet perspective discusses patient safety challenges in ambulatory care, particularly during the COVID-19 pandemic.
Thiruchelvam K, Byles J, Hasan SS, et al. Res Social Adm Pharm. 2022;18:3758-3765.
Potentially inappropriate medications (PIMs) are common among older adults living in residential care facilities. This study examined the impact of the Australian Residential Medication Management Review (RMMR) service (a patient-centered medication review program) on PIM prescribing among older women living in residential aged care facilities. Researchers identified no evidence of an association between the medication review program and use of PIMs in the following year.
Randles MA. Drugs Aging. 2022;39:597-606.
Potentially inappropriate prescribing (PIP) among older adults is common and can result in medication-related harm. This narrative review summarizes the evidence on the association between potential frailty and PIP. The authors identified several challenges in measuring and reducing the risks of PIP, including the need for user-friendly methods to rapidly and accurately identify frailty in older adults at risk of PIP.

Schnipper JL. Ann Intern Med. 2022;175(8):ho2-ho3.

Medication reconciliation is a primary method for improving the safety of medication administration in acute care. This essay highlights how individual hospitalists can improve medication reconciliation both at the practice and organizational level. Areas of influence discussed include medication history completeness and health information technology design.
Zhu J, Weingart SN. UpToDate. August 8, 2022.
Unsafe medication systems in hospitals can lead to adverse drug events (ADEs). This review discusses patient care and organizational factors that contribute to ADEs, methods to detect medication errors, and prevention strategies such as medication reconciliation and enhanced pharmacist participation.
WebM&M Case August 5, 2022

This WebM&M highlights two cases where home diabetes medications were not reviewed during medication reconciliation and the preventable harm that could have occurred. The commentary discusses the importance of medication reconciliation, how to compile the ‘best possible medication history’, and how pharmacy staff roles and responsibilities can reduce medication errors.

Jordan M, Young-Whitford M, Mullan J, et al. Aust J Gen Pract. 2022;51:521-528.
Interventions such as deprescribing, pharmacist involvement, and medication reconciliation are used to reduce polypharmacy and use of high-risk medications such as opioids. In this study, a pharmacist was embedded in general practice to support medication management of high-risk patients. This study presents perspectives of the pharmacists, general practitioners, practice personnel, patients, and carers who participated in the program.
Stuijt CCM, van den Bemt BJF, Boerlage VE, et al. BMC Health Serv Res. 2022;22:722.
Medication reconciliation can reduce medication errors, but implementation practices can vary across institutions. In this study, researchers compared data for patients from six hospitals and different clinical departments and found that hospitals differed in the number and type of medication reconciliation interventions performed. Qualitative analysis suggests that patient mix, types of healthcare professionals involved, and when and where the medication reconciliation interviews took place, influence the number of interventions performed.
Nanji K. UpToDate. June 23, 2022.
Perioperative adverse drug events are common and understudied. This review examines factors that contribute to adverse drug events in the surgical setting and discusses prevention strategies that focus on medication reconciliation, technology, standardization, and institutional change.
Jambon J, Choukroun C, Roux-Marson C, et al. Clin Neuropharmacol. 2022;45:65-71.
Polypharmacy in older adults is an ongoing safety concern due to the risk of being prescribed a potentially inappropriate medication or co-prescription of medications with dangerous interactions. In this study of adults aged 65 and older with chronic pain, 54% were taking at least one potentially inappropriate medication and 43% were at moderate or high risk of adverse drug events. Measures such as involvement of a pharmacist in medication review could reduce risk of adverse drug events in older adult outpatients.
Molist-Brunet N, Sevilla-Sánchez D, Puigoriol-Juvanteny E, et al. Int J Environ Res Public Health. 2022;19:3423.
Inappropriate prescribing and polypharmacy can place older adults at increased risk for medication-related adverse events. This study found that up to 90% of older adults had at least one inappropriate prescription, regardless of residential setting but medication review resulted in a greater decrease in risk factors for medication-related adverse events (e.g., polypharmacy, therapeutic complexity) among nursing home patients compared to patients living at home.
Díez R, Cadenas R, Susperregui J, et al. Int J Environ Res Public Health. 2022;19:4313.
Older adults living in nursing homes are at increased risk of polypharmacy and its associated adverse outcomes, such as drug-drug interactions. The medication records of 222 older adult residents of one Spanish nursing home were screened for potential drug-drug adverse events. Nearly all included residents were taking at least one potentially inappropriate medication, and drug-drug interactions were common.