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The PSNet Collection: All Content

The AHRQ PSNet Collection comprises an extensive selection of resources relevant to the patient safety community. These resources come in a variety of formats, including literature, research, tools, and Web sites. Resources are identified using the National Library of Medicine’s Medline database, various news and content aggregators, and the expertise of the AHRQ PSNet editorial and technical teams.

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Displaying 1 - 20 of 61 Results
Temkin-Greener H, Mao Y, McGarry B, et al. J Am Med Dir Assoc. 2022;Epub Oct 18.
Long-term care facilities can struggle with establishing a safety culture. Researchers in this study used a national survey on nursing home safety culture to assess patient safety culture in assisted living facilities. Findings show that direct care workers had significantly worse perceptions of patient safety culture (including nonpunitive responses to mistakes, management support for resident safety, and teamwork) compared to administrators. A PSNet perspective discusses how to change safety culture.
Rockville, MD: Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality.
In this annual publication, AHRQ reviews the results of the National Healthcare Quality Report and National Healthcare Disparities Report. The 2022 report discusses a decrease in life expectancy due to the COVID-19 pandemic. It also reviews the current status of special areas of interest such as maternity care, child and adolescent mental health, and substance abuse disorders. 
Sachs JD, Karim SSA, Aknin L, et al. Lancet. 2022;400:1224-1280.
COVID-19 illuminated gaps in emergency preparedness and healthcare delivery in the face of a global pandemic. This report from the Lancet Commission identifies strategies for strengthening the multilateral system to address global emergencies such as the COVID-19 pandemic. The report describes a conceptual framework for understanding pandemics; reviews global, regional, and national responses to the COVID-19 pandemic; and provides recommendations for ending the COVID-19 pandemic and preparing for future pandemics.

Washington, DC: United States Government Accountability Office; Publication GAO-22-105133. September 14, 2022.

COVID-19 generated unprecedented challenges for the nursing home industry, revealing and amplifying process, staffing, trust, and infection control weaknesses to the detriment of care. This report analyzed current infection protection actions in long-term care. A primary improvement conclusion drawn from the examination is to strengthen the role of infection control professionals.

President’s Council of Advisors on Science and Technology. Washington, DC: White House; September 21, 2022.

National efforts are required to adjust the health care system and embed safety in programs and processes. Speakers participating in this webinar discussed the impact of errors on families, adverse event prevalence, aviation safety lessons, nursing’s improvement role, the current state of patient safety and what needs to be done to reduce the impact and associated cost of harm.
Lim Fat GJ, Gopaul A, Pananos AD, et al. Geriatrics (Basel). 2022;7:81.
The risk of adverse events increases with prolonged hospital stays. This descriptive study examined adverse events among older patients with extended hospital admissions pending transfer to long-term care (LTC) settings at two Canadian hospitals. Analyses showed that patients were designated as “alternate level of care” (ALC) for an average of 56 days before transfer to LTC and adverse events such as falls and urinary tract infections were common.
Neely J, Sampath R, Kirkbride G, et al. J Correct Health Care. 2022;28:141-147.
Incarcerated individuals face unique patient safety threats. Based on a collaboration between the Illinois Department of Corrections and the University of Illinois College of Nursing, this article describes a plan for improving the quality and safety of healthcare for the state’s incarcerated population.  
St Paul, MN: Minnesota Department of Health.
The National Quality Forum has defined 29 never events—patient safety problems that should never occur, such as wrong-site surgery and patient falls. Since 2003, Minnesota hospitals have been required to report such incidents. The 2021 report summarizes information about 508 adverse events that were reported, representing a significant increase in the year covered. Earlier reports document a fairly consistent count of adverse events. The rise reflected here is likely due to demands on staffing and care processes associated with COVID-19. Pressure ulcers and fall-related injuries were the most common incidents documented. Reports from previous years are available.

National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press; 2022. ISBN: 9780309686259

Nursing homes face significant patient safety challenges, and these challenges became more apparent during the COVID-19 pandemic. This report identifies key issues in the delivery of care for nursing home residents and provides recommendations to strengthen the quality and safety of care delivery, such as improved working conditions, enhanced minimum staffing standards, improving quality measurement, and strengthening emergency preparedness.

Stein L, Fraser J, Penzenstadler N et al. USA Today. March 10, 2022.

Nursing home residents, staff, and care processes were particularly vulnerable to COVID-19. This collection of resources examines data and documentation involving one nursing home chain to reveal systemic problems that contributed to failure. It shares family stories that illustrate how COVID affected care in long-term care environments.

Occupational Safety and Health AdministrationMarch 2, 2022.

The impact of nursing home inspections to ensure the quality and safety of the service environment is lacking. Weaknesses in the process became more explicit as poor long-term care infection control was determined to be a contributor to the early spread of COVID amongst nursing home residents. This announcement outlines a targeted inspection initiative to assess whether organizations previously sited have made progress toward improving workforce safety.

Geneva, Switzerland: World Health Organization and International Labour Organization; 2022. ISBN 9789240040779.

Workforce well-being emerged as a key component of patient safety during the COVID-19 crisis. This report supplies international perspectives for informing the establishment of national regulations and organization-based programs to strengthen efforts aiming to develop health industry workforce health and safety strategies.

Washington, DC: United States Government Accountability Office; November 30, 2021. Publication GAO-22-105142.

Patient complaints have the potential to be used for care improvement as they surface problems in health facilities. This report examined complaint response processes in Veterans Affairs nursing homes and found them lacking. Five recommendations submitted to drive improvement underscore the value of adherence to policy and the transfer of complaint experiences to leadership.

Gebeloff R, Thomas K, Silver-Greenberg J. New York TimesDecember 9, 2021.

Nursing homes harbor numerous challenges to patient safety and they should be transparently reported and acted upon to ensure improvement. This news investigation discusses a gap in the reporting and inspection of nursing home incidents that undermines the ability of the US nursing home rating system to inform consumer long term care facility choice.

Thomas K, Gebeloff R, Silver-Greenberg J. New York Times. September 11, 2021.

Nursing home medication misuse is a contributor to resident harm. This story highlights system influences such as staffing shortages, reporting failures and normalization of prescribing behaviors that coincide with the misuse of antipsychotic medications and overdiagnosis of schizophrenia.
Serre N, Espin S, Indar A, et al. J Nurs Care Qual. 2022;37:188-194.
Safety concerns are common in long-term care (LTC) facilities. This qualitative study of LTC nurses explored nurses’ experiences managing patient safety incidents (PSI). Three categories were identified: commitment to resident safety, workplace culture, and emotional reaction. Barriers and facilitators were also discussed.

Medscape Medical News. May 12, 2021.

Delays and mistakes in health care for distinct patient populations hold improvement lessons for the broader system. This news story highlights problems in correctional system cancer diagnoses and treatment that may indicate other types of prison care delivery problems.
Sloane PD, Yearby R, Konetzka RT, et al. J Am Med Dir Assoc. 2021;22:886-892.
Racial bias and racism are increasingly seen as a critical patient safety issue. In this article, the authors outline the components of systemic racism (structural/institutional, cultural, and interpersonal), how they manifest and affect the long-term care system, and the detrimental impact of systemic racism on Blacks during the COVID-19 pandemic.

Silver-Greenberg J, Gebeloff R. New York Times. March 13, 2021.

The value of rating systems can be challenged by bias and misinterpretation due to a variety of factors. This article outlines how nursing home patients fell victim to both systemic and care failings in the US nursing homes, yet their facilities still ranked high in a national rating system. The authors discuss failures including the lack of data auditing and a focus on ratings rather than quality.
Gandhi A, Yu H, Grabowski DC. Health Aff (Millwood). 2021;40:384-391.
Prior research has found that high nursing staff turnover is associated with lower patient safety culture. Starting in July 2016, the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) began collecting daily staffing data for US nursing homes and found that nurse turnover rates were correlated with facility location, for-profit status, Medicaid patient census, and star ratings. This information can be leveraged by policymakers, payers, and healthcare consumers and may incentive efforts to reduce nursing staff turnover.