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The PSNet Collection: All Content

The AHRQ PSNet Collection comprises an extensive selection of resources relevant to the patient safety community. These resources come in a variety of formats, including literature, research, tools, and Web sites. Resources are identified using the National Library of Medicine’s Medline database, various news and content aggregators, and the expertise of the AHRQ PSNet editorial and technical teams.

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Displaying 1 - 20 of 59 Results
Rockville, MD: Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality.
In this annual publication, AHRQ reviews the results of the National Healthcare Quality Report and National Healthcare Disparities Report. The 2022 report discusses a decrease in life expectancy due to the COVID-19 pandemic. It also reviews the current status of special areas of interest such as maternity care, child and adolescent mental health, and substance abuse disorders. 

AMA J Ethics. 2022;24(8):e715-e816.

Health inequity is recent expansion in the patient safety canon. This special issue examines poor access, quality of care, and health status as contributors to patient harm. Articles discuss race, gender, and ethnicity as factors generating unsafe experiences for patients.

NIHCM Foundation. Washington DC: National Institute for Health Care Management. August 2, 2022.

Preventable maternal morbidity is an ongoing challenge in the United States. This infographic shares general data and statistics that demonstrate the presence of racial disparities in maternal care that are linked to structural racism. The resource highlights several avenues for improvement such as diversification of the perinatal staffing and increased access to telehealth.
St Paul, MN: Minnesota Department of Health.
The National Quality Forum has defined 29 never events—patient safety problems that should never occur, such as wrong-site surgery and patient falls. Since 2003, Minnesota hospitals have been required to report such incidents. The 2021 report summarizes information about 508 adverse events that were reported, representing a significant increase in the year covered. Earlier reports document a fairly consistent count of adverse events. The rise reflected here is likely due to demands on staffing and care processes associated with COVID-19. Pressure ulcers and fall-related injuries were the most common incidents documented. Reports from previous years are available.
Hemmelgarn C, Hatlie MJ, Sheridan S, et al. J Patient Saf Risk Manage. 2022;27:56-58.
This commentary, authored by patients and families who have experienced medical errors, argues current patient safety efforts in the United States lack urgency and commitment, even as the World Health Organization is increasing its efforts. They call on policy makers and safety agencies to collaborate with the Patients for Patient Safety US organization to move improvement efforts forward.
Curated Libraries
September 13, 2021
Ensuring maternal safety is a patient safety priority. This library reflects a curated selection of PSNet content focused on improving maternal safety. Included resources explore strategies with the potential to improve maternal care delivery and outcomes, such as high reliability, care standardization,teamwork, unit-based safety initiatives, and...
Rockville, MD: Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality; July 7 2021.
Health care–associated infections occur across various health care settings. AHRQ seeks to support large research (R01) and dissemination (R18) projects working to develop strategies and approaches for preventing and reducing health care–associated infections. Applications will be accepted on a standard submission schedule through May 27, 2025.
Noursi S, Saluja B, Richey L. J Racial Ethn Health Disparities. 2021;8:661-669.
This study used ecological systems theory to review the literature on the root causes of racial disparities in maternal morbidity and mortality at the individual, interpersonal, community, and societal levels. Factors influencing disparities include access to preconception and prenatal care, implicit bias among health care providers, the need for quality improvement among black-serving hospitals, and policies such as parental leave. The authors also identify interventions likely to reduce disparities, such as improving health professional education, alternate prenatal care providers, and reforming Medicaid policies.
Chauhan A, Walton M, Manias E, et al. Int J Equity Health. 2020;19:118.
In this systematic review, the authors characterized patient safety events affecting ethnic minority populations internationally. Findings indicate that ethnic minority populations experience higher rates of hospital-acquired infections, complications, adverse drug events, and dosing errors. The authors identified several factors contributing to the increased risk, including language proficiency, beliefs about illness and treatment, interpreter use, consumer engagement, and interactions with health professionals.
Judson TJ, Press MJ, Detsky AS. Healthc (Amst). 2019;7:4-6.
Health care is working to provide high-value care and prevent overuse while ensuring patient safety. This commentary highlights the importance of educational initiatives, mentors, and use of clinical decision support to help clinicians determine what amount of care is appropriate for a given clinical situation.
Horn SR, Liu TC, Horowitz JA, et al. Spine (Phila Pa 1976). 2018;43:E1358-E1363.
This retrospective review of National Surgical Quality Improvement Program data on hospital-acquired conditions following elective spine surgery found that 3% of these cases had at least one hospital-acquired condition. The most common conditions were surgical site infection, followed by urinary tract infection and venous thromboembolism, all well-recognized conditions with known evidence-based prevention strategies.
Fonarow GC. JAMA. 2018;320:2539-2541.
Using financial incentives to motivate health care improvement can have unintended consequences. This commentary examines how the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services Hospital Readmissions Reduction Program may have unintended consequences for postdischarge heart failure patients. The authors advocate for development of more effective policies and measures to reduce the potential for patient harm resulting from well-intentioned improvement efforts.
Vokes RA, Bearman G, Bazzoli GJ. Curr Infect Dis Rep. 2018;20:35.
Pay-for-performance strategies have been employed to reduce medical errors and improve care quality. This review examines the impact of financial incentives on occurrence of hospital-acquired infections. The authors suggest hospital administrators partner with clinicians and infection control experts to develop evidence-based policies and guidelines to prevent infections in their organizations.
Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality. Health Care Innovations Exchange. May 18, 2016.
This issue highlights innovations that can be applied in a variety of health care environments to prevent hospital-acquired conditions. The resources include the Chartbook on Patient Safety and checklist, decision support, and screening programs.

Jt Comm J Qual Patient Saf. 2016;42(6):243-264.

The Eisenberg Award honors individuals and organizations who have made vital accomplishments in improving quality and patient safety. This special collection of articles provides insights on the work of the 2015 honorees: Pascale Carayon, PhD; Premier, Inc.; and Mayo Clinic Hospital-Rochester.
Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality. Priorities in Focus. March 2016.
The National Quality Strategy is part of AHRQ's ongoing efforts to enhance patient safety. This brief summarizes the results of the Partnership for Patients program and other initiatives working toward achieving the goals of the National Quality Strategy, including reducing hospital-acquired conditions, preventable readmissions, and patient harm.
FDA Safety Communication. Silver Spring, MD: US Food and Drug Administration; February 25, 2015.
The practice of using multi-dose insulin pens, meant for single patient use only, among multiple patients has been linked to health care–associated infections. This announcement outlines federal labeling requirements to raise awareness of the risks associated with this practice to prevent misuse of the devices.