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Thiruchelvam K, Byles J, Hasan SS, et al. Res Social Adm Pharm. 2022;18:3758-3765.
Potentially inappropriate medications (PIMs) are common among older adults living in residential care facilities. This study examined the impact of the Australian Residential Medication Management Review (RMMR) service (a patient-centered medication review program) on PIM prescribing among older women living in residential aged care facilities. Researchers identified no evidence of an association between the medication review program and use of PIMs in the following year.
Thiele L, Flabouris A, Thompson C. PLoS ONE. 2022;17:e0269921.
Patient and family engagement is essential for safe healthcare. This single-site study found that while most clinicians perceived that patients and families are able to recognize clinical deterioration, clinicians expressed less favorable perceptions towards escalation processes when patients or families have concerns about clinical deterioration.
Jordan M, Young-Whitford M, Mullan J, et al. Aust J Gen Pract. 2022;51:521-528.
Interventions such as deprescribing, pharmacist involvement, and medication reconciliation are used to reduce polypharmacy and use of high-risk medications such as opioids. In this study, a pharmacist was embedded in general practice to support medication management of high-risk patients. This study presents perspectives of the pharmacists, general practitioners, practice personnel, patients, and carers who participated in the program.
Joseph K, Newman B, Manias E, et al. Patient Educ Couns. 2022;105:2778-2784.
Lack of patient engagement in care can place them at increased risk for safety events. This qualitative study explored ethnic minority stakeholder perspectives about patient engagement in cancer care. Focus groups consisting of participants from consumer and health organizations involved in cancer care in Australia identified three themes supporting successful engagement – consideration of sociocultural beliefs about cancer, adaptation of existing techniques tailored to stakeholders (e.g., culturally specific content), and accounting for factors such as cultural competence during implementation.
Carfora L, Foley CM, Hagi-Diakou P, et al. PLoS ONE. 2022;17:e0267030.
Patients are frequently asked to complete patient-reported outcome measures (PROM), or standardized questionnaires, to assess general quality of life, screen for specific conditions or risk factors, and perspectives on their health. This review identified 14 studies related to patient perspectives regarding PROMs. Three themes emerged: patient preferences regarding PROMs, patient perceived benefits, and barriers to patient engagement with PROMs.
Wailling J, Kooijman A, Hughes J, et al. Health Expect. 2022;25:1192-1199.
Harm resulting from patient safety incidents can be compounded if investigating responses ignore the human relationships involved. This article describes how compounded harm arises, and it recommends the use of a restorative practices. A restorative approach focuses on (1) who has been hurt and their needs, and who is responsible for addressing those needs, (2) how harms and relationships can be repaired, and avenues to prevent the incident from reoccurring.
Latimer S, Hewitt J, de Wet C, et al. J Clin Nurs. 2022;Epub Mar 6.
Medication reconciliation at hospital discharge has become a mainstay of patient safety efforts with most of the focus on pharmacist involvement. Focus groups of hospital nurses were conducted to elicit their perspectives on their role in medication reconciliation. Three themes emerged: nurses' role involves chasing, checking, and educating; burden of undertaking medication reconciliation at hospital discharge; team collaboration and communication in medication reconciliation.
Manias E, Street M, Lowe G, et al. BMC Health Serv Res. 2021;21:1025.
This study explored associations between person-related (e.g., individual responsible for medication error), environment-related (e.g., transitions of care), and communication-related (e.g., misreading of medication order) medication errors in two Australian hospitals. The authors recommend that improved communication regarding medications with patients and families could reduce medication errors associated with possible or probable harm.
Gillespie BM, Harbeck EL, Kang E, et al. J Patient Saf. 2021;17:e448-e454.
Nontechnical skills such as teamwork and communication can influence surgical performance. This Australian hospital implemented a team training program for surgical teams focused on improving individual and shared situational awareness which led to improvements in nontechnical skills.
Adie K, Fois RA, McLachlan AJ, et al. Br J Clin Pharmacol. 2021;87:4809-4822.
Medication errors are a common cause of patient harm. This study analyzed medication incident (MI) reports from thirty community pharmacies in Australia. Most errors occurred during the prescribing stage and were the result of interrelated causes such as poor communication and not following procedures/guidelines. Further research into these causes could reduce medication errors in the community.
Tobiano G, Chaboyer W, Dornan G, et al. Aging Clin Exp Res. 2021;33:3353-3361.
Medication safety, particularly among older adults who may have complex medication regimens, is an ongoing safety concern. This study explored medication safety behaviors among young-old (65-74 years), middle-old (75-84 years) and old-old (>85 years) adults. The authors found that older adults are willing to engage in medication safety behaviors, but that preferred behaviors (e.g., verbal behaviors, self-administering medication, reviewing medication charts) differed among the age groups.
Hada A, Coyer F. Nurs Health Sci. 2021;23:337-351.
Safe patient handover from one nursing shift to the next requires complete and accurate communication between nurses. This review aimed to identify which nursing handover interventions result in improved patient outcomes (i.e., patient falls, pressure injuries, medication administration errors). Interventions differed across the included studies, but results indicate that moving the handover to the bedside and using a structured approach, such as Situation, Background, Assessment, Recommendation (SBAR) improved patient outcomes.
Thomas J, Dahm MR, Li J, et al. Health Expect. 2021;24:222-233.
Missed or failure to follow up on test results threatens patient safety. This qualitative study used volunteers to explore consumer perspectives related to test result management. Participants identified several challenges that patients experience with test-results management, including systems-level factors related to the emergency department and patient-level factors impacting understanding of test results.
Manias E, Bucknall T, Woodward-Kron R, et al. Int J Environ Res Public Health. 2021;18:3925.
Interprofessional communication is critical to safe medication management during transitions of care. Researchers conducted this ethnographic study to explore inter- and intra-professional communications during older adults’ transitions of care. Communication was influenced by the transferring setting, receiving setting, and ‘real-time’ communication. Lack of, or poor, communication impacted medication safety; researchers recommend more proactive communication and involvement of the pharmacist.
Cutler NA, Sim J, Halcomb E, et al. J Clin Nurs. 2020;29:4379-4386.
An important element of providing patient-centered care is enhancing patient perceptions of safety. This qualitative study explored how nurses influence perceptions of safety among patients admitted for acute mental health care. Findings suggest that nurses can improve patients’ sense of safety by being available, responsive, and caring towards patients, while also focusing on management of risk.
Luetsch K, Rowett D, Twigg MJ. BMJ Qual Saf. 2021;30:418-430.
Pharmacist-led medication reconciliation after hospital discharge has been found to reduce medication discrepancies, but its effect on subsequent healthcare utilization is not clear.In this evidence synthesis, the authors explored the reasons why pharmacist-led medication reconciliation after hospital discharge succeeds or fails. The authors found that medication reconciliation resulting in beneficial outcomes was performed in accordance with patient preferences, promoted coordination and collaboration between healthcare professionals, and established trust between patients and providers.
Wright B, Lennox A, Graber ML, et al. BMC Health Serv Res. 2020;20:897.
Incomplete or delayed test result communication can contribute to diagnostic errors, delayed treatments and patient harm. The authors synthesized systematic and narrative reviews from multiple perspectives discussing diagnostic test result communication failures. The review identified several avenues for improving closed-loop communication through the use of technology, audit and feedback, and use of point-of-care or bedside testing.
Boylen S, Cherian S, Gill FJ, et al. JBI Evid Synth. 2020;18:1360-1388.
In this systematic review, the authors synthesized evidence on the impact of professional interpreters on outcomes for hospitalized children from migrant and refugee families with limited English proficiency. The authors conclude that while video and in-person interpreters are more favorable for some outcomes, use of a professional interpreter of any mode was superior to the use of an ad hoc interpreter, or to no interpreter at all.  
Borshoff DC, Sadleir P. Curr Opin Anaesthesiol. 2020;33:554-560.
The COVID-19 pandemic has resulted in the delivery of anesthesia outside of operating rooms, such as in emergency departments, intensive care units, and makeshift field hospitals. This review examines challenges in maintaining patient safety while providing anesthesia services in nontraditional operating room environments.