Skip to main content

All Content

Search Tips
Save
Selection
Format
Download
Published Date
Original Publication Date
Original Publication Date
PSNet Publication Date
Additional Filters
1 - 20 of 183
Farrell TW, Butler JM, Towsley GL, et al. Int J Environ Res Public Health. 2022;19:5975.
A robust culture of safety encourages open communication between team members. Certified nursing assistants (CNAs) and nurses in nursing homes were asked about the extent to which their input about residents was valued by the other team members. CNAs reported they felt valued by other CNAs and nurses, but less valued by physicians and pharmacists.

A psychologically safe environment for healthcare teams is desirable for optimal team performance, team member well-being, and favorable patient safety outcomes. This piece explores facilitators of and barriers to psychological safety across healthcare settings. Future research directions examining psychological safety in healthcare are discussed.

Ottawa, ON: Canadian Patient Safety Institute; 2008.
This initative defines competency domains for safe health care and outlines educational practices to achieve them. The 2nd edition of the Patient Safety Competencies was released in 2020. 
Guo W, Li Y, Temkin-Greener H. J Am Med Dir Assoc. 2021;22:2384-2388.e1.
This study examined the association between patient safety culture (PSC) and community discharge of long-term care (LTC) residents.  Results show that two domains of PSC- teamwork and supervisor expectations and actions regarding patient safety- are significantly associated with increased likelihood of discharge to a community setting. Focusing on these domains to improve patient safety culture may also increase community discharge rates. 
De Brún A, Anjara S, Cunningham U, et al. Int J Environ Res Public Health. 2020;17:8673.
Leadership has an important role in promoting a culture of safety and enabling necessary changes to enhance patient safety. This article summarizes the design, pilot testing, and refinement of the Collective Leadership for Safety Culture (Co-Lead) program, which offers a systematic approach to developing collective leadership behaviors to promote effective teamwork and enhance safety culture.
Bacon CT, McCoy TP, Henshaw DS. J Nurs Adm. 2021;51(1) :12-18.
Lack of communication and interpersonal dynamics can contribute to failure to rescue. This study surveyed 262 surgical staff about perceived safety climate, but the authors did not find an association between organizational safety culture and failure to rescue or inpatient mortality.  
Orth J, Li Y, Simning A, et al. Gerontologist. 2021;61:1296-1306.
Nursing home patient safety culture is associated with healthcare quality and patient outcomes. This large cross-sectional study of nursing homes in the United States found that speaking-up behavior and communication openness were associated with a decreased risk of in-residence death among older adults with dementia. This association was strong in nursing homes located in states with higher nursing home nurse staffing requirements.  

Multidisciplinary teams at the University of Kansas Hospital sought to improve patient outcomes from obstetric emergencies by rehearsing team responses in simulations to emergent situations that can occur during a delivery. Using the PRactical Obstetric MultiProfessional Training (or PROMPT) curriculum, teams rehearsed flexible emergency care scenarios in order to achieve an optimal response, and then used this experience to improve their response to a real emergency.

This piece discusses the concept of Safety Across the Board and reviews the three key components necessary for successful implementation in a healthcare organization: culture, strong safety processes, and engagement.

Edwin Loftin, DNP, MBA, RN, NEA-BC-FACHE is the Senior Vice President of Integrated and Acute Care Services and the Chief Nursing Officer (CNO) at Parrish Medical Center in Titusville, Florida. We spoke with him about his experiences with the concept of safety across the board at his medical center.

Trinchero E, Kominis G, Dudau A, et al. Public Manag Rev. 2020;22.
Employing a mixed-methods approach, this study found that teamwork (directly and indirectly) positively impacted professionals’ safety behavior. Teamwork indirectly impacted safety behavior by increasing individual’s positive psychological capital, thereby increasing their self-efficacy and resilience. These findings emphasize the role of hospital leadership and middle management in creating an organizational culture of safety
JN Learning. 2020.
Disruptive behavior is a recognized deterrent to safe communication, sharing of concerns and teamwork. This educational program highlights a study that measured the impact of unprofessional physician behavior on patient care and features Dr. William Cooper and Dr. Gerald Hickson as speakers.
Deilkås ECT, Hofoss D, Husebo BS, et al. PLoS One. 2019;14:e0218244.
Researchers deployed the Norwegian version of the Safety Attitudes Questionnaire, a measure of safety culture, across long-term care facilities and found significant variations in scores. They conclude that safety culture measurement may be useful to align resources with needs to support patient safety.
Ruskin KJ, Stiegler MP, Rosenbaum SH, eds. New York, NY: Oxford University Press; 2016. ISBN: 9780199366149.
The perioperative setting is a high-risk environment. This publication discusses the clinical foundations and application of safety concepts in perioperative practice. Chapters cover topics such as human factors, error management, cognitive aids, safety culture, and teamwork.
Casali G, Cullen W, Lock G. J Thorac Dis. 2019;11:S998-S1008.
Nontechnical skills, such as teamwork, communication, and leadership, are essential human-centered components of safe surgical practice. This commentary discusses contextual characteristics needed to support nontechnical skill development to improve health care outcomes. The authors recommend a cultural shift away from focusing on technical performance to one that incorporates training in nontechnical skills.
Sturrock J. Edinburgh, Scotland: The Scottish Government; May 2019. ISBN: 9781787817760.
Disrespectful and unprofessional behaviors are a common problem in health care. The report examines cultural issues at a National Health Service trust that affected the transparency needed to report disruptive behaviors and that limited conversation needed to facilitate local actions and improvement. Recommendations for the leadership, organizational, and system levels are provided to enable constructive change.
A proceduralist went to perform ultrasound and thoracentesis on an elderly man admitted to the medicine service with bilateral pleural effusions. Unfortunately, he scanned the wrong patient (the patient had the same last name and was in the room next door). When the patient care assistant notified the physician of the error, he proceeded to scan the correct patient. He later nominated the assistant for a Stand Up for Safety Award.