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The PSNet Collection: All Content

The AHRQ PSNet Collection comprises an extensive selection of resources relevant to the patient safety community. These resources come in a variety of formats, including literature, research, tools, and Web sites. Resources are identified using the National Library of Medicine’s Medline database, various news and content aggregators, and the expertise of the AHRQ PSNet editorial and technical teams.

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Displaying 1 - 6 of 6 Results
Martin K, Bickle K, Lok J. Int J Mental Health Nurs. 2022;31:897-907.
Cognitive biases can compromise decision making and contribute to poor care. In this study, nurses were provided two patient vignettes as well as associated clinical notes written using either biased or neutral language and asked to make clinical decisions regarding PRN (“as needed”) medication administration for sleep. The study identified a relationship between biased language and clinical decision-making (such as omitting patient education when administering PRN medications).

Sentinel Event Alert. July 30, 2019;(61):1-5.

Anticoagulant medications are known to be high-risk for adverse drug events. Although direct oral anticoagulants (DOACs) require less monitoring than warfarin, they are still associated with an increased risk of patient harm if not prescribed and administered correctly. The Joint Commission has issued a new sentinel event alert to raise awareness of the risks related to DOACs, and in particular, the challenges associated with stopping bleeding in patients on these medications. The alert suggests that health care organizations develop patient education materials, policies, and evidence-based guidelines to ensure that DOACs and reversal agents are used appropriately. A past WebM&M commentary discussed common errors related to the use of DOACs.
Cottney A, Innes J. Int J Ment Health Nurs. 2015;24:65-74.
In this prospective observational study at a psychiatric hospital, errors were identified in 3% of medication administration episodes, with omission being the most common error type. As in prior studies, interruptions and higher patient volume were associated with increased risk of mistakes.
Jayaram G, Doyle D, Steinwachs D, et al. J Psychiatr Pract. 2011;17:81-8.
Adverse drug events have been documented as a significant problem in inpatient psychiatric facilities, but methods of preventing errors in this setting have not been researched. This study, conducted at an academic inpatient psychiatric hospital, combined a computerized provider order entry system with a structured event reporting system that was used by physicians, nurses, and pharmacists. Implementation of the system was associated with a significant reduction in both prescribing errors and medication administration errors over a 5-year period.
WebM&M Case October 1, 2010
A man prescribed a tricyclic antidepressant and an antipsychotic medication was found unconscious and unresponsive at home and was brought to the emergency department (ED). An electrocardiogram showed potentially dangerous heart rhythms.