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The PSNet Collection: All Content

The AHRQ PSNet Collection comprises an extensive selection of resources relevant to the patient safety community. These resources come in a variety of formats, including literature, research, tools, and Web sites. Resources are identified using the National Library of Medicine’s Medline database, various news and content aggregators, and the expertise of the AHRQ PSNet editorial and technical teams.

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Displaying 1 - 20 of 2613 Results
Perspective on Safety November 16, 2022

Dr. Pascale Carayon, PhD, is a professor emerita in the Department of Industrial and Systems Engineering and the founding director of the Wisconsin Institute for Healthcare Systems Engineering (WIHSE). Dr. Nicole Werner, PhD, is an associate professor in the Department of Health and Wellness Design at the Indiana University School of Public Health-Bloomington. We spoke with both of them about the role of human factors engineering has in improving healthcare delivery and its role in patient safety.

Wilson M-A, Sinno M, Hacker Teper M, et al. J Patient Saf. 2022;18:680-685.
Achieving zero preventable harm is an ongoing goal for health systems. In this study, researchers developed a five-part strategy to achieve high-reliability and eliminate preventable harm at one regional health system in Canada – (1) engage leadership, (2) develop an organization-specific patient safety framework, (3) monitor specific quality aims (e.g., high-risk, high-cost areas), (4) standardize the incident review process, including the use of root cause analysis, and (5) communicate progress to staff in real-time via electronic dashboards. One-year post-implementation, researchers observed an increase in patient safety incident reporting and improvements in safety culture, as well as decreases in adverse events such as falls, pressure injuries and healthcare-acquired infections.
Tubic B, Finizia C, Zainal Kamil A, et al. Nurs Open. 2022;Epub Oct 31.
Interventions to increase patient engagement in safety are receiving increasing attention. In this study, patients were given a safety leaflet containing information about the patient can avoid adverse events during their hospital stay. Participants were overall satisfied about receiving information about their care but noted a lack of communication between healthcare personnel and patients regarding the safety leaflet.

Washington, DC: Veterans Affairs Office of Inspector General; 2022. Report No. 22-00818-03.

Organizational evaluations often reveal opportunities to address persistent quality and safety issues. This extensive inspection report shares findings from examinations at 45 Veterans Health Administration care facilities that focused on assessing oversight, system redesign and surgical programs. Recommendations drawn from the analysis call for improvements in protected peer review, surgical work structure and surgical adverse incident examination.
Patient Safety Innovation November 16, 2022

While electronic health records, computerized provider order entry, and clinical decision support have increased patient safety, they can also create new challenges such as alert fatigue. One medical center developed and implemented a program to identify and reduce the number of alerts clinicians encounter every day. 

Adamson HK, Foster B, Clarke R, et al. J Patient Saf. 2022;18:e1096-e1101.
Computed tomography (CT) scans are important diagnostic tools but can present serious dangers from overexposure to radiation. Researchers reviewed 133 radiation incidents reported to one NHS trust from 2015-2018. Reported events included radiation incidents, near-miss incidents, and repeat scans. Most events were investigated using a systems approach, and staff were encouraged to report all types of incidents, including near misses, to foster a culture of safety and enable learning.

Iyer R, Walker A, eds. Paediatr Anaesth. 2022;32(11):1176-1272.

Progress made in the adoption of infrastructure, Safety I, and Safety II concepts in high- and middle- to lower-income countries around the world support safe pediatric anesthesia care. The articles in this issue illustrate progress made over time in the specialty, highlight areas of focused attention, and examine quality improvement and Lean approaches as success strategies.
Karanikas N, Khan SR, Baker PRA, et al. Safety Sci. 2022;156:105906.
Some patient safety interventions, such as checklists, are adapted or borrowed from other industries, such as aviation. This literature review focused on safety interventions developed in one context then implemented in another, such as healthcare. Healthcare was the largest sector represented, with 20 of the 73 included studies.

Dixon-Woods M, Martin G, eds. Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press; 2022.

Improvement activities are complex initiatives that require synergistic actions by organizations to be sustained. This evolving series provides background, evidence, and discussion on interdisciplinary strategies known to affect quality and safety such as implementation science, collaboration, positive deviance, and culture change.
Loving VA, Nolan C, Bessel M. Jt Comm J Qual Patient Saf. 2022;48:599-608.
The Safety-II perspective emphasizes improving patient safety by focusing on what goes right in healthcare, rather than on errors or what goes wrong (Safety-I). This article describes the development, implementation, and evaluation of an organizational, asset-based quality improvement tool to complement existing practices (such as peer review and incident reporting) and provide an additional avenue to identify best practices and successful quality improvement initiatives.
Joseph MM, Mahajan P, Snow SK, et al. Pediatrics. 2022;Epub Oct 3.
Children with emergent care needs are often cared for in complex situations that can diminish safety. This joint policy statement updates preceding recommendations to enhance the safety of care to children presenting at the emergency department. It expands on the application of topics within a high-reliability framework focusing on leadership, managerial factors, and organizational factors that support safety culture and workforce empowerment to support safe emergency care for children.

Farnborough, UK: Healthcare Safety Investigation Branch; 2022.

Distinct individual skills and organizational factors strengthen patient safety incident analysis efforts. This series of educational video modules encapsulates a curriculum for investigation teams associated with a national United Kingdom program. It covers topics such as safety science and analysis initiative strategy.

Rockville, MD: Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality. November 7, 2022.

An organization’s understanding of its culture is foundational to patient safety. This webinar introduced the AHRQ Surveys on Patient Safety Culture™ (SOPS®) program. The session covered the types of surveys available and review resources available to best use the data to facilitate conversations and comparisons to inform improvement efforts. 
Curated Libraries
October 10, 2022
Selected PSNet materials for a general safety audience focusing on improvements in the diagnostic process and the strategies that support them to prevent diagnostic errors from harming patients.
Martins MS, Lourenção DC de A, Pimentel RR da S, et al. BMJ Open. 2022;12:e060182.
In early 2020, hospitals, organizations, and expert panels released recommendations to maintain patient safety while reducing spread of COVID-19. This review summarized safety recommendations from 125 studies, reviews, and expert consensus documents. Recommendations were categorized into one of four areas: organization of health services, management of airways, sanitary and hygiene measures, and management of communication. Planning and implementing best practices based on these recommendations ensure safe care during COVID-19 and future pandemics.
Richie CD, Castle JT, Davis GA, et al. Angiology. 2022;73:712-715.
Hospital-acquired venous thromboembolism (VTE) continues to be a significant source of preventable patient harm. This study retrospectively examined patients admitted with VTE and found that only 15% received correct risk stratification and appropriate management and treatment. The case review found that patients were commonly incorrectly stratified, received incorrect pharmaceutical treatment, or inadequate application of mechanical prophylaxis (e.g., intermittent compression).
Passwater M, Huggins YM, Delvo Favre ED, et al. Am J Clin Pathol. 2022;158:212-215.
Wrong blood in tube (WBIT) errors are rare but can lead to complications. One hospital implemented a quality improvement project to reduce WBIT errors with electronic patient identification, manual independent dual verification, and staff education. WBIT errors were significantly reduced and sustained over six years.
Rogers JE, Hilgers TR, Keebler JR, et al. Jt Comm J Qual Patient Saf. 2022;48:612-616.
Patient safety investigations hinge on the expertise and experiences of the investigator. This commentary discusses the ways in which cognitive biases can impact patient safety investigations and identifies potential mitigation strategies to improve decision-making processes.