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This WebM&M describes two cases involving patients who became unresponsive in unconventional locations – inside of a computed tomography (CT) scanner and at an outpatient transplant clinic – and strategies to ensure that all healthcare teams are prepared to deliver advanced cardiac life support (ACLS), such as the use of mock codes and standardized ACLS algorithms.

Jagsi R, Griffith KA, Vicini F, et al for the Michigan Radiation Oncology Quality Consortium. JAMA OncolEpub 2022 Apr 21. 

Concordance of patient-reported symptoms and provider-documented symptoms is necessary for appropriate patient care and has clinical implications for research. This study compared patient-reported symptoms (pain, pruritus, edema, and fatigue) following radiotherapy for breast cancer with provider assessments. Underrecognition of at least one symptom occurred in more than 50% of patients. Underrecognition was more common in Black patients and those seen by male physicians. The authors suggest that interventions to improve communication between providers and patients may not only improve outcomes but also reduce racial disparities.
Gilmartin HM, Hess E, Mueller C, et al. Health Serv Res. 2022;57:385-391.
Ideal clinical learning environments (CLE) support employee engagement, satisfaction, and a culture of safety. The Learning Environment and High Reliability Practices Survey (LEHR) was used to determine the association between ideal CLE and job satisfaction, burnout, intent to leave, and staff turnover. Learning environments with higher average LEHR scores were associated with higher employee engagement, retention, and safety climate scores.
Le Cornu E, Murray S, Brown EJ, et al. J Med Radiat Sci. 2021;68:356-363.
Use of health information technology (HIT) can improve care but also lead to unexpected patient harm. In this analysis of incidents and near misses in radiation oncology, a major change in the use of the electronic health record (EHR) led to an increase in reported incidents and near misses. Leaders and HIT professionals should be aware of potential issues and develop a plan to minimize risk prior to major departmental changed including EHR changes.

Main EK, Fowler JM, Gabbe SG, eds. Clin Obstet Gynecol. 2019;62:vii-xii,403-626.

Obstetrics is a high-risk practice that concurrently manages the safety of mothers and newborns. Articles in this special issue discuss how to address burnout and support resilience in obstetrics and gynecology care. Tactics covered include bundles, checklists, and collaboratives.
Stahl JM, Mack K, Cebula S, et al. Mil Med. 2019.
This retrospective study of dental patient safety reports in the military health system demonstrated an increase in reported events, which may reflect improvements in safety culture. Wrong-site surgery was the most common adverse event, suggesting the need to enhance safety practices in dentistry.

Gluck PA, ed. Obstet Gynecol Clin North Am. 2019;46:H1-H8, 199-398.

Obstetrics is a high-risk practice that concurrently manages the safety of mothers and newborns. Articles in this special issue explore various facets of health care quality and safety improvement in the care of women and expectant mothers. Topics covered include the patient experience, safety culture, disparities, program implementation, and clinical trends.
Radiology ES of, Societies EF of R. Insights Imaging. 2019;10:45.
Numerous factors affect safe imaging practice, including potential harms associated with radiation, staffing demands, and patient physical and psychological well-being. This policy statement provides multidisciplinary insights on safety themes in radiology that go beyond the core concern of inappropriate radiation exposure. The authors recommend tactics to reduce the risks related to data protection, service environment, teamwork, burnout, and training.

Livingston E, Howell EA. JAMA Clin Rev. April 2, 2019.

Maternal mortality in the United States is gaining increased attention as a patient safety concern. This podcast discusses conditions known to challenge maternal safety, the high incidence of preventable harm in this population, and care bundles as an improvement strategy. A recent Annual Perspective summarized national initiatives to improve safety in maternity care.
Wong LP. Semin Dial. 2019;32:266-273.
Patients with end-stage renal disease are vulnerable to adverse events in dialysis. This commentary outlines a team-based approach to improving safety in dialysis care. The authors highlight the importance of multidisciplinary teamwork, accountability, and coleadership to develop high-functioning teams for safe dialysis.
Slomski A. JAMA. 2019;321:1239-1241.
Maternal mortality is a sentinel event that affects mothers and families across a wide range of socioeconomic characteristics. This commentary explores how data collection gaps, medical errors, ineffective treatments, and care coordination weaknesses contribute to preventable maternal death. The author highlights efforts to improve safety in maternity care such as best practice bundles to ensure teams and clinicians are prepared for certain complications.
Young S, Shapiro FE, Urman RD. Curr Opin Anaesthesiol. 2018;31:707-712.
Office-based surgery is increasingly common, despite concerns regarding its safety. This review summarizes the literature on ambulatory surgery outcomes and identified risk factors such as case complexity, patient comorbidities, and anesthesia use. Few studies examined anesthesia use in dental care.
Romijn A, Ravelli A, de Bruijne MC, et al. BJOG. 2019;126:907-914.
This cluster-randomized trial examined whether a team training intervention would improve perinatal and maternal outcomes for singleton births without congenital abnormalities, on or after 32 weeks gestation. Researchers found no significant change in incidence of adverse outcomes, suggesting that simulation-based training alone is not sufficient to optimize perinatal safety.
Dr. Haas is an obstetrician–gynecologist and co-Principal Investigator for Ariadne Labs' work focused on health care system expansion. We spoke with her about the trend of health systems getting larger and more integrated, the risks to patient safety, and ways to mitigate these risks.
Jordan KP, Timmis A, Croft P, et al. BMJ. 2017;357:j1194.
Missed and delayed diagnoses are an increasingly recognized patient safety problem. A common undiagnosed symptom in outpatient medicine is chest pain. This retrospective cohort study compared outcomes for three groups of patients with chest pain: those whose pain remained undiagnosed after 6 months versus those diagnosed with either coronary artery disease or a verified noncardiac cause of chest pain. Only a minority of the undiagnosed patients underwent diagnostic testing for coronary artery disease. The highest risk of myocardial infarction was in patients with diagnosed coronary artery disease, but undiagnosed patients were more likely to have a myocardial infarction than those with verified noncardiac disease. The authors conclude that patients without a timely diagnosis merit further evaluation to reduce the risk of cardiovascular events.
Ardenne M, Reitnauer PG. Arzneimittel-Forschung. 1975;25:1369-79.
Insufficient application of new evidence to inform treatment decisions can hinder safe care delivery. Articles in this special issue explore common renal replacement management strategies that may need to be assessed and redesigned to improve the safety of patients receiving dialysis.
Rozmovits L, Mior S, Boon H. BMC Complement Altern Med. 2016;16:164.
This qualitative study sought to assess safety culture among practitioners performing spinal manipulation, mostly chiropractors and physiotherapists. Investigators found that concerns about patient safety were mingled with issues such as competing for business in a fee-for-service model and establishing professionalism when credentials are not consistent. They suggest that a shared understanding of the risks associated with spinal manipulation is needed before incident reporting across multiple practitioner types can be implemented.
Geneva, Switzerland: World Health Organization; 2016. ISBN: 9789241510349.
Overuse of diagnostic imaging poses patient safety hazards, particularly for children. This report reviews techniques clinicians can use to discuss risks associated with using radiologic procedures with parents of pediatric patients. The publication includes answers to common questions about various types of tests and tips for enhancing conversations with parents.
Lee BS, Gallagher TH. Am J Ophthalmol. 2014;158:1108-1110.e2.
This commentary spotlights elements of ophthalmology practice that can influence error disclosure, particularly the prevalence of patients receiving care from optometrists outside the hospital environment with no central reporting mechanism.