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The PSNet Collection: All Content

The AHRQ PSNet Collection comprises an extensive selection of resources relevant to the patient safety community. These resources come in a variety of formats, including literature, research, tools, and Web sites. Resources are identified using the National Library of Medicine’s Medline database, various news and content aggregators, and the expertise of the AHRQ PSNet editorial and technical teams.

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Displaying 1 - 20 of 397 Results
Baluyot A, McNeill C, Wiers S. Patient Safety. 2022;4:18-25.
Transitions from hospital to skilled nursing facilities (SNF) remain a patient safety challenge. This quality improvement (QI) project included development of a structured handoff tool to decrease the wait time for receipt of controlled medications and intravenous (IV) antibiotics and time to medication administration. The project demonstrated significant improvements in both aims and can be replicated in other SNFs.

National Quality Forum. Omni Shoreham Hotel, Washington DC, February 20-22, 2023.

This hybrid annual conference will focus motivating innovation through effective measurement in health care. The content will be directed toward a multidisciplinary audience to support healthcare improvement in all communities in areas such as maternal outcomes and equity. The session will feature a presentation of the John Eisenberg award winners and Atul Gawande as a key note speaker.

Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality. January 24, 2023, 1:00 – 2:00 PM (eastern).

Workplace safety became more apparent during the COVID pandemic as an essential component to support effective and safe care provision. This session will introduce the AHRQ Workplace Safety Supplemental Item Set for use with the Surveys on Patient Safety Culture™ (SOPS®) Nursing Home Survey that examines staff perceptions of workplace safety. Background on the importance of workplace safety in nursing homes, results from a pilot test in 48 nursing homes, and one organization’s experience with the survey will be shared.

Collaborative for Accountability and Improvement.  January 26, 2023, 2:00-3:00 PM (eastern).

Root cause analysis (RCA) is a recognized approach to examining failures by identifying causal factors to define improvement effort. This session will discuss challenges to the effective use of RCA results and examine an approach to present them that supports effective improvement action.
Carlile N, Fuller TE, Benneyan JC, et al. J Patient Saf. 2022;18:e1142-e1149.
The opioid epidemic has prompted national and institutional guidelines for safe opioid prescribing. This paper describes the development, implementation, and sustainment of a toolkit for safer opioid prescribing for chronic pain in primary care. The authors describe organizational, technical, and external barriers to implementation along with attempted solutions and their effects. The toolkit is available as supplemental material.
Engel JR, Lindsay M, O'Brien S, et al. J Nurs Adm. 2022;52:511-518.
Alert fatigue occurs when healthcare workers become desensitized to alarms over time, especially when alarms tend to be clinically nonsignificant, and therefore, ignored or not responded to. This study reports on one health system’s redesign of cardiac monitoring structure to reduce alert fatigue. Through a four-phase quality improvement project, three hospitals were able to decrease alarms by 74-95% and sustained the results for 12 months.
Saran AK, Holden NA, Garrison SR. BJGP Open. 2022;6:BJGPO.2022.0001.
Tablet-splitting may introduce patient safety risks, such as unpredictable dosing. This systematic review and qualitative synthesis did not identify substantive evidence to support tablet-splitting concerns, with the exception of sustained-release tablets and use by older adults who may struggle to split tablets due to physical limitations.
Carmack A, Valleru J, Randall KH, et al. Jt Comm J Qual Patient Saf. 2023;49:3-13.
Retained surgical items (RSI) are a never event, a serious and preventable event. After experiencing a high rate of RSIs, this United States health system implemented a bundle to reduce RSI, improve near-miss reporting, and increase process reliability in operating rooms. The bundle consisted of five elements: surgical stop, surgical debrief, visual counters, imaging, and reporting.
Wilson M-A, Sinno M, Hacker Teper M, et al. J Patient Saf. 2022;18:680-685.
Achieving zero preventable harm is an ongoing goal for health systems. In this study, researchers developed a five-part strategy to achieve high-reliability and eliminate preventable harm at one regional health system in Canada – (1) engage leadership, (2) develop an organization-specific patient safety framework, (3) monitor specific quality aims (e.g., high-risk, high-cost areas), (4) standardize the incident review process, including the use of root cause analysis, and (5) communicate progress to staff in real-time via electronic dashboards. One-year post-implementation, researchers observed an increase in patient safety incident reporting and improvements in safety culture, as well as decreases in adverse events such as falls, pressure injuries and healthcare-acquired infections.
Angel M, Bechard L, Pua YH, et al. Age Ageing. 2022;51:afac225.
People taking medications at home may have difficulty opening packaging which can result in improper, dangerous storage practices. This review includes 12 studies where participants were observed opening a variety of medication packages (e.g., blister packs, child-resistant containers). While all studies reported participant difficulty, no consistent contributory factors were identified, and the methodological quality of all studies was typically low. Additional research is required to encourage improvement in medication packaging.

Washington, DC: Veterans Affairs Office of Inspector General; 2022. Report No. 22-00818-03.

Organizational evaluations often reveal opportunities to address persistent quality and safety issues. This extensive inspection report shares findings from examinations at 45 Veterans Health Administration care facilities that focused on assessing oversight, system redesign and surgical programs. Recommendations drawn from the analysis call for improvements in protected peer review, surgical work structure and surgical adverse incident examination.
Patient Safety Innovation November 16, 2022

While electronic health records, computerized provider order entry, and clinical decision support have increased patient safety, they can also create new challenges such as alert fatigue. One medical center developed and implemented a program to identify and reduce the number of alerts clinicians encounter every day. 

Adamson HK, Foster B, Clarke R, et al. J Patient Saf. 2022;18:e1096-e1101.
Computed tomography (CT) scans are important diagnostic tools but can present serious dangers from overexposure to radiation. Researchers reviewed 133 radiation incidents reported to one NHS trust from 2015-2018. Reported events included radiation incidents, near-miss incidents, and repeat scans. Most events were investigated using a systems approach, and staff were encouraged to report all types of incidents, including near misses, to foster a culture of safety and enable learning.
Karanikas N, Khan SR, Baker PRA, et al. Safety Sci. 2022;156:105906.
Some patient safety interventions, such as checklists, are adapted or borrowed from other industries, such as aviation. This literature review focused on safety interventions developed in one context then implemented in another, such as healthcare. Healthcare was the largest sector represented, with 20 of the 73 included studies.

Dixon-Woods M, Martin G, eds. Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press; 2022.

Improvement activities are complex initiatives that require synergistic actions by organizations to be sustained. This evolving series provides background, evidence, and discussion on interdisciplinary strategies known to affect quality and safety such as implementation science, collaboration, positive deviance, and culture change.
Loving VA, Nolan C, Bessel M. Jt Comm J Qual Patient Saf. 2022;48:599-608.
The Safety-II perspective emphasizes improving patient safety by focusing on what goes right in healthcare, rather than on errors or what goes wrong (Safety-I). This article describes the development, implementation, and evaluation of an organizational, asset-based quality improvement tool to complement existing practices (such as peer review and incident reporting) and provide an additional avenue to identify best practices and successful quality improvement initiatives.
Curated Libraries
October 10, 2022
Selected PSNet materials for a general safety audience focusing on improvements in the diagnostic process and the strategies that support them to prevent diagnostic errors from harming patients.
Martins MS, Lourenção DC de A, Pimentel RR da S, et al. BMJ Open. 2022;12:e060182.
In early 2020, hospitals, organizations, and expert panels released recommendations to maintain patient safety while reducing spread of COVID-19. This review summarized safety recommendations from 125 studies, reviews, and expert consensus documents. Recommendations were categorized into one of four areas: organization of health services, management of airways, sanitary and hygiene measures, and management of communication. Planning and implementing best practices based on these recommendations ensure safe care during COVID-19 and future pandemics.
Passwater M, Huggins YM, Delvo Favre ED, et al. Am J Clin Pathol. 2022;158:212-215.
Wrong blood in tube (WBIT) errors are rare but can lead to complications. One hospital implemented a quality improvement project to reduce WBIT errors with electronic patient identification, manual independent dual verification, and staff education. WBIT errors were significantly reduced and sustained over six years.